iPads, MakerEd and More in Education
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Failure is for the privileged.

Failure is for the privileged. | iPads, MakerEd and More  in Education | Scoop.it

"This past week I attend the Infosis CrossRoads Institute. It was filled with some great speakers and panels, but the most profound moment for me was a single statement made by Kipp Bradford, “failure is for the privileged.”

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What is learning in 'blinks', and why you should do it- Daily Genius

What is learning in 'blinks', and why you should do it- Daily Genius | iPads, MakerEd and More  in Education | Scoop.it
How to learn, via fifteen minute text and audio 'blinks' that you can dive into whenever you have a spare minute.
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7 Brain-Based Ways to Make Learning Stick - MiddleWeb

7 Brain-Based Ways to Make Learning Stick - MiddleWeb | iPads, MakerEd and More  in Education | Scoop.it
When my students forget from day to day (short-term memory) and from year to year (long-term memory) can I just blame their distracted brains? Or is there a teaching issue here? The fact is, moving learning from short-term to long-term memory is not a single step.

For most information to be remembered, seven separate steps are required. Most are steps that teachers have been trained to use, but there are a few things we miss, according to the experts.
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Hey, Alexa, What Are You Teaching Our Kids? | MindShift | KQED News

Hey, Alexa, What Are You Teaching Our Kids? | MindShift | KQED News | iPads, MakerEd and More  in Education | Scoop.it
“Alexa, tell me a story.” “Siri, what is 32 divided by 3?” “Google, why does it snow?”

One in six Americans now owns a smart speaker like Amazon’s Alexa or Google Home, and 75 percent of homes are likely to have one by 2020. That means information and learning opportunities are more accessible to children than ever before, but it also raises unsettling questions for educators and parents. How do children know whether to trust information from these devices’ disembodied voices? Will kids miss opportunities for rich conversation when they ask Alexa a question instead of mom or dad?

Smart speakers are so new that we don’t yet know for sure how they are impacting learning and development. But it’s a question of great interest to many media and child development experts as they, like the rest of us, try to keep up with the ever-evolving technology around us.
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Productive Struggle & Math Rigor Free Resources

Productive Struggle & Math Rigor Free Resources | iPads, MakerEd and More  in Education | Scoop.it

Rigorous math instruction through productive struggle can guide students toward becoming highly capable creative problem solvers in non-routine situations.


Tons of free resources for professional development for educators.


Via MIND Research Institute
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Scaffolding Maker Education Learning Experiences - Jackie Gerstein @JackieGerstein

Scaffolding Maker Education Learning Experiences - Jackie Gerstein @JackieGerstein | iPads, MakerEd and More  in Education | Scoop.it
This is how I approach facilitating maker education activities. Direct instruction is provided through structured and prescribed activities with the goal of learners then being able to eventually go into self-determined directions. There has been some criticism leveraged against out-of-the-box maker education kits, programmable robots, and step-by-step maker activities. My contention is that learners often don’t know what they don’t know; and that giving them the basic skills frees them to then use their creativity and innovation to take these tools into self-determined directions.
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How to Take Risks In A System Not Built For It (What Teachers Can Learn From Elon Musk) - @ajjuliani

How to Take Risks In A System Not Built For It (What Teachers Can Learn From Elon Musk) - @ajjuliani | iPads, MakerEd and More  in Education | Scoop.it

"While John Spencer and I were developing the LAUNCH Cycle, we came up with a few areas that were likely stumbling blocks in the creative (design-thinking inspired) process. One of the keys to the Launch Cycle is taking the time to Look, Listen, and Learn throughout the entire process (that is the L in the LAUNCH acronym).


In talking with George Couros about the Launch Cycle we had a good conversation about when it was appropriate to share that learning.


The quick answer: all the time. From start to finish you can be learning and sharing during the process.


Whether it is students doing a Genius Hour Project, teachers creating their own PD, or school leaders implementing an initiative — the key is to be transparent with that learning process."

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How To Make Learning Visible: A Spectrum - TeachThought

How To Make Learning Visible: A Spectrum - TeachThought | iPads, MakerEd and More  in Education | Scoop.it
What students say and do and create are products of thought processes that, more or less, are predictable–and of significant potential if we can make those processes visible.
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Carlos Fosca's curator insight, November 1, 2017 8:31 AM

"Las credenciales (badges), como evidencia de logro son interesantes, pero insuficientes porque son residuales, efectistas, simples artefactos. Pero si las usamos como la primera "etapa" de una idea en crecimiento, entonces podemos iluminar y catalizar el aprendizaje como un proceso mientras está sucediendo, y en el proceso, conectar a los estudiantes con alguien más que sólo el docente.

La gran idea, entonces, es desarrollar el pensamiento detrás de las calificaciones, los certificados y las credenciales en pos de una ecología genuina de aprendizaje, empujando al pasado el compartir simplemente evidencia de un "dominio" (que es perecedero), para enfocarse en cómo hacen preguntas los estudiantes, buscan la información, aplican sus propios pensamientos y ven el aprendizaje como un proceso fluido y completamente personal." (Terry Heick)

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Innovate My School - Why Art is a vital part of education

Innovate My School - Why Art is a vital part of education | iPads, MakerEd and More  in Education | Scoop.it
Schools are doing more to extend the parameters of the learning experience, and frequently see lessons taking place in assembly halls, school fields and playgrounds, kitchens and music rooms. “Schools are doing more to extend the parameters of the learning experience.”Arts subjects are often the catalyst for taking a class further afield, and provide children with opportunities to break the mold of the regular classroom setting, and of what constitutes academic work. Infant- and junior-school age children can see particular benefit from expanding the possibilities of school in this way.


Arts subjects hold much more promise than simply getting children out of the classroom. They can help young children develop their skills and competencies in interesting ways, in a relaxed and pressure-free environment. These are some of the ways in which your children can grow and learn through art.

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4 novel ways to get kids reading and learning - USA Today

4 novel ways to get kids reading and learning - USA Today | iPads, MakerEd and More  in Education | Scoop.it
As young kids enter the classroom for another school year – or perhaps their first – parents can take comfort in knowing there are smart apps that give their children a boost.

Whether it’s educational games, homework helpers, learning to code, or encouraging kids to read, there’s no shortage of affordable downloads and cloud services playable on devices like tablets, smartphones, laptops and desktops.

If you’re looking for some “best-in-class” suggestions, the following is a look at four such platforms, catering to various ages and subjects.
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Helping Learners Move Beyond “I Can’t Do This”

Helping Learners Move Beyond “I Can’t Do This” | iPads, MakerEd and More  in Education | Scoop.it
I work part-time with elementary learners – with gifted learners during the school year and teaching maker education camps during the summer. The one thing almost all of them have in common is yelling out, “I can’t do this” when the tasks aren’t completed upon first attempts or get a little too difficult for them. I partially blame this on the way most school curriculum is structured. Too much school curriculum is based on paper for quick and one shot learning experiences (or the comparable online worksheets). Students are asked to do worksheets on paper, answer end-of-chapter questions on paper, write essays on paper, do math problems on paper, fill in the blanks on paper, and pick the correct answer out of a multiple choice set of answers on paper. These tasks are then graded as to the percentage correct and then the teacher moves onto the next task.

So it is no wonder that when learners are given hands-on tasks such as those common to maker education, STEM, and STEAM, they sometimes struggle with their completion. Struggles are good. Struggles with authentic tasks mimics real life so much more than completing those types of tasks and assessments done at most schools.

Problems like yelling out, “I can’t do this” arise when the tasks get a little too difficult, but ultimately are manageable. I used to work with delinquent kids within Outward Bound-type programs. Most at-risk kids have some self-defeating behaviors including those that result in personal failure. The model for these types of programs is that helping participants push past their self-perceived limitations results in the beginnings of a success rather than a failure orientation. This leads into a success building upon success behavioral cycle.
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Kelly Christopherson's curator insight, August 2, 2017 2:36 PM
It's important to help students to develop the skills to bridge the gap between not being able to do something right now and the journey to being able do it once skills are developed. 
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's curator insight, August 3, 2017 2:25 PM
Metocognition is a skill students can use to reflect on their learning. Peers learning together and helping each other is beneficial.

Something I did was asked students to tell me what they understood about their learning. It told me where the gaps were. They know what they know, but not what they don't know.

Costa and Kallick's 16 Habits of Mind is a good resource to use with students.
Amrika Nicole's curator insight, December 10, 2017 7:18 PM
Module 2: Conceptualizations of Giftedness and Talent
The power of "yet" in schools and growth mindset is taking off. This year I have created a bulletin board with commonly used phrases that students have used and have changed them to the growth mindset phrase that would go along with it. I think before you can expect your students to have this growth mindset the staff has to believe and use it too. We have spent part of a PD talking about phrases that we use as teacher to make them growth mindset. 
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Why Mistakes Matter in Creating A Path For Learning - Mind Shift

Why Mistakes Matter in Creating A Path For Learning - Mind Shift | iPads, MakerEd and More  in Education | Scoop.it
Most of us can remember a moment like this from our school years: the teacher poses a question – maybe it’s math, maybe history. You raise your hand, you give your answer with full assurance. And then? You’re shot down. You got it wrong.

We remember moments like this because they brim with some of our least favorite emotions: shame, humiliation, self-recrimination, and that gutting sense that you want to melt into the floor. Ah yes, I remember it well.

As it turns out, though, such moments are ripe with learning opportunity. Contrary to what many of us might guess, making a mistake with high confidence and then being corrected is one of the most powerful ways to absorb something and retain it.

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Mark Cottee's curator insight, October 22, 2017 5:35 PM
I am currently in the middle of a MOOC around the science of teaching and just happened across this article through one of my other professional learning networks. Made me think about social media and platforms such as Facebook and LinkedIn for example which are generally filled with posts celebrating success - (self posts that is), and wondering about a platform where we celebrate our failures?
David W. Deeds's curator insight, October 23, 2017 8:39 AM

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"Kids Can't Learn From Teachers They Don't Like" - TeachThought

"Kids Can't Learn From Teachers They Don't Like" - TeachThought | iPads, MakerEd and More  in Education | Scoop.it
The following TEDTalk by Rita Pierson reminds us of why we all got involved in teaching to begin with.

While curriculum, assessment, and instructional design may be how you parse your thinking now, at one point it probably had more to do with content, curiosity, and relationships. In this talk, the 40-year veteran teacher reminds us that not only do relationships matters, sometimes they’re all that matters.
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Robot see, robot do: Nvidia system lets robots learn by watching humans - New Atlas

If robots are ever going to earn their keep, they'll need to learn on the job. Factory supervisors have better things to do than program complex instructions, so what if they could just show robots what to do, the same way they would a new human worker? AI researchers from Nvidia have now demonstrated a system that lets robots do just that, learning how to perform a specific task by watching someone do it just once.
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A Principal's Reflections: Preparing Learners for the Fourth Industrial Revolution

A Principal's Reflections: Preparing Learners for the Fourth Industrial Revolution | iPads, MakerEd and More  in Education | Scoop.it
Do you like change? If you do, then living in the present is an exhilarating experience.  For those who don’t, buckle up as we are only going to see unprecedented innovations at exponential rates involving technology.  You can’t run or hide from it. The revolution, or evolution depending on your respective lens, of our world, will transform everything as we know it. We must adapt, but more importantly, prepare our learners for a bold new world that is totally unpredictable.  Welcome to the Fourth Industrial Revolution.  
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The Architecture of Ideal Learning Environments - Edutopia

The Architecture of Ideal Learning Environments - Edutopia | iPads, MakerEd and More  in Education | Scoop.it
We talked to some of the leading architects in the country about five key principles in K–12 school design.
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Carlos Fosca's curator insight, March 29, 7:54 AM

En el mundo de la educación, el diseño de los espacios condicionan fuertemente el proceso de aprendizaje de los estudiantes. Por ello las tendencias actuales es ir a espacios mucho más flexibles, sin paredes, con diversidad de ambientes que estimulen el aprendizaje activo y que permitan aprender directamente del contacto con la naturaleza. 

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Can #creativity be #taught? - eSchool News

Can #creativity be #taught? - eSchool News | iPads, MakerEd and More  in Education | Scoop.it
As we look at future jobs and technological advancements, having creativity is essential in the workplace. Robots and AI will be able to handle many tasks, even replacing some types of jobs, but we will still need creative thinkers and designers to move ahead globally. As educators, how do we ensure that students learn this skill in our curriculums? Can creativity be taught? Why are some people more creative than others? If you tell students to be creative, do they even know what it means or where to begin?
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Gayle Kakac's curator insight, February 17, 12:45 AM
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Never stop learning – Where you can learn something new in 2018

Never stop learning – Where you can learn something new in 2018 | iPads, MakerEd and More  in Education | Scoop.it
Technology supports both synchronous and asynchronous learning, which opens up flexibility and choice of when to learn. Audio podcasts allow learners to listen to recordings wherever they choose to, and many do this as they commute to or from work. Webinar technologies have enabled group verbal conversations to take place online, along with chat functions where users can type short messages to each other. Videos can provide helpful ways to learn visually and at your own pace with the ability to rewind and replay.  Indeed through YouTube videos I learned how to mend my washing machine! As a result, there are now a multitude of online learning opportunities available, many of which are free. Choose from informal or formal, short or extended courses, and learn with others or independently. Develop or learn new skills, take up a new hobby or engage in a full online course.

Below are a just a selection of some of the online courses now available.
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Ten ideas that changed my teaching: #1 There is no average student

Ten ideas that changed my teaching: #1 There is no average student | iPads, MakerEd and More  in Education | Scoop.it
I don’t think anyone would argue that all people are the same. Sure we’re made of the same DNA, we all smell, get hungry, angry, laugh and spend most of our lives trying to discover who we are and…

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
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Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's curator insight, November 9, 2017 5:25 PM
There is no average student and one-size-does-not-fit-all. Jaggedness (Alan Watts' wiggly world concept), complexity (even chaos), context, different paths, and breaking from the idea of average are essential to be a teacher and move away from conformity and compliance.

Differences make a difference.
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The 6 Drivers of Inquiry-Based Learning - Cooper on Curriculum

The 6 Drivers of Inquiry-Based Learning - Cooper on Curriculum | iPads, MakerEd and More  in Education | Scoop.it
As an administrator, whenever I walk into a teacher’s classroom, one of the first things I almost always subconsciously look for is whether or not the students are engaged in inquiry. However, telling a teacher, “Your students need to engage in more inquiry,” is comparable to letting a comedian know she needs to be funnier or asking a pizzaiolo to make a better dough. And, vague directives in the absence of explicit instruction typically generate anxiety.

To avoid these anxieties, and for progress to actually take place, we need to drill down to the nitty gritty and be as explicit as possible. In other words, we need to be explicit about being explicit and leverage specific strategies to comfortably move forward for the benefit of our students.

With these thoughts in mind, I’ve been obsessing over inquiry’s common denominators – the strategies or drivers we should always consider when implementing an inquiry-based lesson.

That being said, here are the six drivers of inquiry-based learning. And, while I don’t think every lesson or activity must have all six, I do believe that once we (and our students) become comfortable with an inquiry approach, all drivers will naturally find a way into learning experiences on a regular, if not daily, basis.
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Carlos Fosca's curator insight, November 2, 2017 8:06 AM

El aprendizaje basado en la indagación (inquiry-based learning) se puede definir como aprendizaje que comienza planteando preguntas, problemas o escenarios, en lugar de simplemente presentar hechos establecidos o describir un camino liso, sin obstáculos aparentes, hacia el conocimiento. En resumen, descubrimos material, en contraposición a la cobertura de contenido y a la memorización y regurgitación de hechos y conocimiento.

Concepción Fernández's curator insight, February 14, 4:59 AM
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The best learning apps - Engadget

The best learning apps - Engadget | iPads, MakerEd and More  in Education | Scoop.it

"To find the best learning apps, we sought recommendations from several experts, including Jennifer Auten, an award-winning teacher who's been using apps in the classroom since 2010; Björn Jeffery, CEO of kids-game developer Toca Boca; and representatives from Project Lead The Way, an education nonprofit that promotes STEM curricula. We also talked with an astronomer, a programmer, and several parents on our staff about the apps their kids love. Finally, we read reports on learning app efficacy from several educational foundations and child development psychologists.

We focused primarily on apps aimed at kids 3 to 8 years old, and looked for these features as recommended by the experts we spoke to:

*Open-ended, with limits: Apps that are open-ended inspire kids to explore and create, but they should also have built-in limits to encourage them to put the game down after awhile.


*Engaging but not distracting: A good learning app uses interactive, animated, and responsive features to engage kids and promote learning, not simply to entertain.


*Encouraging interaction: Apps that encourage real-life interaction with other people can be especially strong at facilitating learning."

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A Classroom Full of Risk Takers - @Edutopia

A Classroom Full of Risk Takers - @Edutopia | iPads, MakerEd and More  in Education | Scoop.it
No one learns without making mistakes. Quite the opposite—we learn when we make mistakes. But in the classroom, making mistakes and taking risks can be at best unrewarded, and at worst ridiculed and unnecessarily penalized.

I asked my 21-year-old son the other day what high school class had made him feel safe to make mistakes. He said that he never made mistakes. Really? He explained that he only did the work if he knew he was going to succeed. That made me think about my own teaching: Do I create a classroom where students will be risk takers?
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LaDawna Harrington's curator insight, September 20, 2017 11:35 AM
The library is the place to ask questions and hunt for answers and engage with multiple literacies that allow for critical thinking and problem-solving.
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10 apps that will make learning fun for your kids - Business Insider

10 apps that will make learning fun for your kids - Business Insider | iPads, MakerEd and More  in Education | Scoop.it
Educational apps can create the dynamic, engaging, playful world of learning that you might not always be able to yourself. Here are 10 apps worth downloading.
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The Tides of Online Learning Have Turned… What’s Next? | @krissyvenosdale 

The Tides of Online Learning Have Turned… What’s Next? | @krissyvenosdale  | iPads, MakerEd and More  in Education | Scoop.it
Along came social media. The blog, shortened in format, became 140 characters.  Instagram and Facebook became quick photo shares. It became easy to grow a huge network of other educators. Clicking ‘like’ and leaving comments.  It was glorious really.  Empowering to feel like you were leading others as they were leading you.  You were never alone and the learning never slept.  Neither did I. I remember when Twitter first started.  I remember one of the first times I really connected with other classrooms.  I immediately was drawn in by the power… asking questions and getting answers. Reading the tweets of others who pushed my thinking.  There was this reciprocal of open sharing.   The truth is, the friends I met during those early days of Twitter are deep, deep friends today. People I see in person, people I treasure as friends.  The relationships built in the early sharing of Twitter were strong, real, and awesome. The power of the PLN was a real thing. “Personal Learning Network”
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Why Mistakes Matter in Creating A Path For Learning - Mind Shift

Why Mistakes Matter in Creating A Path For Learning - Mind Shift | iPads, MakerEd and More  in Education | Scoop.it
Most of us can remember a moment like this from our school years: the teacher poses a question – maybe it’s math, maybe history. You raise your hand, you give your answer with full assurance. And then? You’re shot down. You got it wrong.

We remember moments like this because they brim with some of our least favorite emotions: shame, humiliation, self-recrimination, and that gutting sense that you want to melt into the floor. Ah yes, I remember it well.

As it turns out, though, such moments are ripe with learning opportunity. Contrary to what many of us might guess, making a mistake with high confidence and then being corrected is one of the most powerful ways to absorb something and retain it.

more...
Mark Cottee's curator insight, October 22, 2017 5:35 PM
I am currently in the middle of a MOOC around the science of teaching and just happened across this article through one of my other professional learning networks. Made me think about social media and platforms such as Facebook and LinkedIn for example which are generally filled with posts celebrating success - (self posts that is), and wondering about a platform where we celebrate our failures?
David W. Deeds's curator insight, October 23, 2017 8:39 AM

Thanks to John Evans.