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Biofuel to comprise 6% of US aviation, marine fuel market by 2024 - Biomass Magazine

Biofuel to comprise 6% of US aviation, marine fuel market by 2024 - Biomass Magazine | Science | Scoop.it
Biomass Magazine Biofuel to comprise 6% of US aviation, marine fuel market by 2024 Biomass Magazine Aviation and marine biofuels represent one of the fastest-growing segments of the global biofuels market.
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The Role and Importance of Glycosylation of Acute Phase Proteins with Focus on Alpha-1 Antitrypsin in Acute and Chronic Inflammatory Conditions - Journal of Proteome Research (ACS Publications)

The Role and Importance of Glycosylation of Acute Phase Proteins with Focus on Alpha-1 Antitrypsin in Acute and Chronic Inflammatory Conditions - Journal of Proteome Research (ACS Publications) | Science | Scoop.it
Review on "The Role and Importance of #Glycosylation of Acute Phase Proteins" http://t.co/6ONZmpc0q3
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RNA Lab | NOVA Labs | PBS

RNA Lab | NOVA Labs | PBS | Science | Scoop.it
See how RNAs work like molecular machines in your cells by solving RNA puzzles. (RT @theNOVALabs: Can you beat all the challenges in the RNA Lab?
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Self-Assembling Nanoparticles Sneak Antisense RNA Into Cells - The Biological SCENE

Self-Assembling Nanoparticles Sneak Antisense RNA Into Cells - The Biological SCENE | Science | Scoop.it
Self-Assembling Nanoparticles Sneak Antisense RNA Into Cells The Biological SCENE A transmission electron microscope image (TEM) shows spherical nanoparticles that deliver antisense RNA into cells.
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An online game with real-world implications: Cracking RNA's code - Washington Post

An online game with real-world implications: Cracking RNA's code - Washington Post | Science | Scoop.it
An online game with real-world implications: Cracking RNA's code Washington Post “RNA's shape determines its function,” it notes.
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Small Mutation Changes Brain Freeze to Hot Foot - Bioscience Technology

Small Mutation Changes Brain Freeze to Hot Foot - Bioscience Technology | Science | Scoop.it
Bioscience Technology Small Mutation Changes Brain Freeze to Hot Foot Bioscience Technology Previous research has identified transient receptor potential (TRP) ion channels as being highly sensitive to either cold or hot temperatures.
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Monitoring RNA levels in blood yields dynamic picture of fetal development ... - Medical Xpress

Monitoring RNA levels in blood yields dynamic picture of fetal development ... - Medical Xpress | Science | Scoop.it
Scope (blog) Monitoring RNA levels in blood yields dynamic picture of fetal development ... Medical Xpress Instead, they've generated a much more dynamic picture by monitoring changing levels of another genetic material—RNA—in the blood.
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RNA interference rebooted

RNA interference rebooted | Science | Scoop.it
Gene-silencing technique yields promising treatments for liver-linked disorders. (With $1 billion investment and 150 therapies being tested, are RNA interference-based therapies finally taking off?
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Looks like RNA has a future in therapy after all.
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Will Synthetic Biology Evolve Into the Next Hot Field?

Will Synthetic Biology Evolve Into the Next Hot Field? | Science | Scoop.it
Five things you should know about this growing segment that aims to modify life itself.
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Are RNA fragments making gene tweaks in descendants? - life - 13 April 2014 - New Scientist

Are RNA fragments making gene tweaks in descendants? - life - 13 April 2014 - New Scientist | Science | Scoop.it
Strands of genetic material known as microRNAs could explain how what happens in your life can cause genetic changes and diseases in subsequent generations
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Spiders and Worms: The All-Organic Way to Mend Bones

Spiders and Worms: The All-Organic Way to Mend Bones | Science | Scoop.it

Broken hip or busted limb? A more seamless, natural path to healing may be in our future - and it starts with spiders.


Via Integrated DNA Technologies
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Scientists develop chip for detection of RNA strand of dengue fever virus - News-Medical.net

Scientists develop chip for detection of RNA strand of dengue fever virus - News-Medical.net | Science | Scoop.it
Science 2.0 Scientists develop chip for detection of RNA strand of dengue fever virus News-Medical.net Scientists at the Center for Research and Advanced Studies (Cinvestav) in Mexico developed a chip (also known as cDNA microarray) that allows...
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Very neat. Now to see if this tool can be used for global health interventions in the developing world.
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Our brains are made for enjoying art

Our brains are made for enjoying art | Science | Scoop.it
Viewing paintings engages a number of different regions of the brain, suggesting art appreciation is a natural biological process, according to an analysis.
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PlasmaDNA: Plan, design and verify your next cloning project with this free molecular biology tool | The Biology Blog

PlasmaDNA: Plan, design and verify your next cloning project with this free molecular biology tool | The Biology Blog | Science | Scoop.it
PlasmaDNA helps plan cloning projects with features to do everything from in silico PCR (and gels!) to ORF analysis, restriction/ligation and alignment
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The Next Wave of Cancer Cures Could Come From Nasty Viruses - Smithsonian

The Next Wave of Cancer Cures Could Come From Nasty Viruses Smithsonian The notion of using viruses to attack cancer has been around nearly as long as we've known about viruses themselves.
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Creating Mutated Versions Of Viruses Not Worth The Risk, Say Scientists

Creating Mutated Versions Of Viruses Not Worth The Risk, Say Scientists | Science | Scoop.it
In the wake of an experiment to see if a mutated form of the H5N1 bird flu could be made transmissible to humans, a pair of biologists are now speaking out about the potential risks posed by such endeavors; they say there's a much greater chance...
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Promising solution: Bioplastic made from shrimp shells

Promising solution: Bioplastic made from shrimp shells | Science | Scoop.it

or many people, “plastic” is a one-word analog for environmental disaster. It is made from precious petroleum, after all, and once discarded in landfills and oceans, it takes centuries to degrade.

 

Then came apparent salvation: “bioplastics,” durable substances made from renewable cellulose, a plant-based polysaccharide. But problems remained. For one, the current bioplastics do not fully degrade in the environment. For another, their use is now limited to packaging material or simple containers for food and drink.

 

Now researchers at Harvard’s Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering have introduced a new bioplastic isolated from shrimp shells. It’s made from chitosan, a form of chitin — the second-most abundant organic material on Earth.

 

Chitin, a tough polysaccharide, is the main ingredient in the hardy shells of crustaceans, the armorlike cuticles of insects, and even the flexible wings of butterflies.

 

The Wyss Institute makes its shrilk from chitin from shrimp shells, most which would otherwise be discarded or used in fertilizer or makeup, and a fibroin protein from silk. Researchers discussed it in a March online study in the journal Macromolecular Materials & Engineering.

 

Shrilk is cheaply and easily fabricated by a novel method that preserves chitosan’s strong mechanical properties. The researchers said that for the first time, this tough, transparent, and renewable material can be used to make large, 3-D objects with complex shapes using traditional casting or injection-molding techniques. That means objects made from shrilk can be mass-manufactured and will be as robust as items made with the everyday plastics used in toys and cell phones.

 

“There is an urgent need in many industries for sustainable materials that can be mass produced,” Wyss Director Donald E. Ingber said in March. “Our scalable manufacturing method shows that chitosan, which is readily available and inexpensive, can serve as a viable bioplastic that could potentially be used instead of conventional plastics for numerous industrial applications.” This environmentally safe alternative to plastic could also be used to make trash bags, packaging, and diapers.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Marco Bertolini's curator insight, May 6, 2014 11:28 AM

Des plastiques bio fabriqués à partir de la chitine des crevettes...

satish's curator insight, May 7, 2014 2:03 AM

टिकाऊपण, लवचिकता आणि सक्षमता यामुळे प्लॅस्टिकचा वापर विविध क्षेत्रामध्ये मोठ्या प्रमाणात वाढला आहे. मात्र, त्याच वेळी त्याच्या अविघटनशीलतेमुळे प्लॅस्टिकचे प्रदुषणही वेगाने वाढत आहे. त्यामुळे विघटनशील असे जैवप्लॅस्टिक विकसित करण्यासाठी जगभरामध्ये सातत्याने संशोधन होत आहे. मात्र, सध्या उपलब्ध असलेलेजैव प्लॅस्टिकचा वापर अत्यंत मर्यादीत कारणांसाठी होऊ शकतो. त्यातही खाद्यपदार्थांचे पॅकेजिंग आणि पेयपात्रासाठी सामान्यतः केला जातो. तसेच हे जैव प्लॅस्टिकही अत्यंत कमी वेगाने विघटीत होते. या साऱ्या समस्यावर मात करण्यासाठी हार्वर्ड विद्यापीठातील वायस इन्स्टिट्यूट फॉर बायोलॉजिकल इन्स्पायर्ड येथील संशोधकांनी कोळंबीच्या कवचापासून जैव प्लॅस्टिक वेगळे केले आहे.

 

प्लॅस्टिकच्या अविघटनशीलतेमुळे होणारे प्रदुषण रोखण्यासाठी हे जैव प्लॅस्टिक अत्यंत उपयुक्त ठरेल.

Adam Johnson's curator insight, June 24, 2017 11:10 PM
Bioplastic from shrimp (prawn) shells. Old(ish) news but very interesting all the same.
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Misconduct in Research at Yale | Learn Science at Scitable

Misconduct in Research at Yale | Learn Science at Scitable | Science | Scoop.it
How prevalent is sabotage in the lab, and does it focus on women?
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"sabotage is not considered research misconduct under the usual rules.  Only faking your own data and plagiarism are now considered research misconduct.  Other interference falls into a grey area."

LOL what?

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Nanorobots that hide in your blood like viruses could someday fight cancer

Nanorobots that hide in your blood like viruses could someday fight cancer | Science | Scoop.it
When it comes to fighting disease, your body's defense system doesn't like enlisting outside help.
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Neat.
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Finding turns neuroanatomy on its head: Researchers present new view of myelin

Finding turns neuroanatomy on its head: Researchers present new view of myelin | Science | Scoop.it
Neuroscientists have made a discovery that turns 160 years of neuroanatomy on its head. Myelin, the electrical insulating material long known to be essential for the fast transmission of impulses along the axons of nerve cells, is not as ubiquitous as thought, according to a new work. "The fact that it is the most evolved neurons, the ones that have expanded dramatically in humans, suggests that what we're seeing might be the "future." As neuronal diversity increases and the brain needs to process more and more complex information, neurons change the way they use myelin to "achieve" more," says the main researcher.
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Glucosidase I: Could targeting N-linked glycosylation of proteins help us fight viral infection?

Glucosidase I: Could targeting N-linked glycosylation of proteins help us fight viral infection? | Science | Scoop.it
Viruses are sneaky. As you probably already know from your last bout with the common cold or the flu, for most viral infections doctors will simply prescribe plenty of water and bed rest. But wha...
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yes yes yes :)
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NIH Panel Urges Steps to Control Growth in Biomedical Research Trainees

NIH Panel Urges Steps to Control Growth in Biomedical Research Trainees | Science | Scoop.it
Too many grad students and postdocs seeking too few academic jobs
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Wyoming firm GlycoBac Receives NIH Grant to Expand Research of Glycoprotein Drugs for Diabetes and Cancer patients

Wyoming firm GlycoBac Receives NIH Grant to Expand Research of Glycoprotein Drugs for Diabetes and Cancer patients | Science | Scoop.it
Christoph Geisler, GlycoBac’s chief research scientist, conducts cell culture research in a molecular biology lab in the College of Agriculture and Natural Resources. GlycoBac recently received a $150,000 SBIR grant from the National Institutes of Health for research to improve the effectiveness of glycoprotein drugs that can potentially help diabetes and cancer patients. (UW News Service)  (Laramie, Wyo.) - A University of Wyoming spin-out business has received a $150,000 Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) grant to improve the effectiveness of drugs that can potentially help diabetes and cancer patients. GlycoBac will use the six-month grant from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) for research to improve the effectiveness of already developed glycoprotein drugs. The overall effectiveness of many small protein drugs is reduced as they are quickly filtered out by the kidneys, says Christoph Geisler, GlycoBac’s chief research scientist. One way .....
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Future of pharma, it seems.

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