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Why no-one speaks Indonesia's language

Why no-one speaks Indonesia's language | Global Studies & AP HuG | Scoop.it
Bahasa Indonesia was adopted to make communication easier across the vast Indonesian archipelago, but its simplicity has only created new barriers.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, August 1, 4:09 PM

Linguistic diffusion faces many barriers, and an island state like Indonesia faces cultural centrifugal forces.  Adopting a national language might be good political policy, but culturally, that doesn't ensure it's viability.  This is a great case study for human geography classes that touches on many curricular topics.

Scoop.it Tags: languageculture, diffusion, Indonesia.

WordPress TAGS: language, culture, diffusion, Indonesia, SouthEast Asia.

dustin colprit's curator insight, September 25, 10:18 PM
It's interesting how certain places try and solve communication barriers in communities. While I was in Afghanistan we often ran into this problem among many local villages. Often we would have to make use of multiple interpreters. 
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Damaged and defiant: Hurricane Harvey

Damaged and defiant: Hurricane Harvey | Global Studies & AP HuG | Scoop.it
Houston holds strong in the wake of devastation left by Hurricane Harvey.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, August 27, 8:51 PM

I am sharing these three interactive webmaps of Houston with my mapping courses to demonstrate what is technologically possible.  Texts, charts, pictures, videos, and maps can be seamlessly integrated to present spatial information in an incredibly engaging and accessible manner.  

Houston's Hurricane Harvey was incredibly impactful but the factors leading to this were also very complex.  These three Story maps lay out:

  1. Houston's urban ecological context
  2. The geographic origins of Hurricane Harvey
  3. The human stories from Hurricane Harvey

 

Scoop.it Tagsphysical, watercoastal, urbanurban ecology, disasters, mappingESRIStoryMap.

WordPress TAGS: physical, water, coastal, urban, urban ecology, disasters, mapping, esri, storymap.

Haleigh Huffman's curator insight, August 28, 3:55 PM
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Political Bubbles and Hidden Diversity: Highlights From a Very Detailed Map of the 2016 Election

Political Bubbles and Hidden Diversity: Highlights From a Very Detailed Map of the 2016 Election | Global Studies & AP HuG | Scoop.it
The Times’s interactive map of precinct results shows that even within partisan strongholds, there are contrary-voting enclaves.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, July 26, 8:40 PM

This feature that shows the 2016 election results at the precinct level is astounding, revealing, and a testament to the difficulty of putting all this information together.  The built-in features in this interactive map to explore selected “voter islands” and one-sided places are especially helpful, but much like Google Earth, many people are eager to zoom in to their own neighborhoods.  The article that accompanies the interactive had some excellent case-studies at a variety of scales.  Geography always matters and the maps reveal so many telling patterns. 

 

Tags: electoral, politicaldensity, mapping.

Nancy Watson's curator insight, July 27, 5:01 PM
Political unit
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Why Is It So Hard for Clothing Manufacturers to Pay a Living Wage?

Why Is It So Hard for Clothing Manufacturers to Pay a Living Wage? | Global Studies & AP HuG | Scoop.it

"In the garment industry, stories about workers who barely eke out an existence on 'starvation wages' are legion: Factory workers in New Delhi often describe living in makeshift hovels 'barely fit for animals.' A young woman from Myanmar might wrestle with the decision to feed her children or send them to school. In Bangladesh, sewing-machine operators frequently toil for 100 hours or more a week, only to run out of money before the end of the month. Workers have demanded higher pay in all those countries, of course, sometimes precipitating violence between protesters and police. Companies in general, however, have preferred to sidestep the issue altogether. In fact, no multinational brand or retailer currently claims to pay its garment workers a wage they can subsist on."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 19, 11:41 AM

In some ways this isn't the right question to be asking.  While clothing brands don't want the bad PR from low wages, like all businesses, they are incentivized to minimize their inputs and maximize their profits.  If capitalistic logic were completely unrestrained, this situation would never change as long as their are low-skill workers.

 

Questions to Ponder: What institutions have the ability to change this situation and what are effective ways to bring about change?  Where are textile industries located in the international division of labor?  How do sweatshops impact the places where they locate in the international division of labor? 

 

Tagsdevelopment, laborglobalization, economicindustry, poverty

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The Two Koreas

The Two Koreas | Global Studies & AP HuG | Scoop.it

"While the Korean War of the early 1950s never formally ended, its aftermath has created starkly divergent worlds for those living on either side of the north-south divide. What follows is a look at life in the two Koreas; how such a night-and-day difference came to be; and where the crisis could go from here. Both governments claimed to be the legitimate rulers of the peninsula. Tensions between north and south gradually mounted, until finally, in June 1950, hundreds of thousands of North Korean troops stormed across the 38th parallel. The unsuspecting South Korean defenders were outgunned and outnumbered, and beat a hasty retreat southward."


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Katie Kershaw's curator insight, April 12, 1:07 PM
It’s hard to see that two groups of people who speak the same language and have the same ethnic backgrounds can live such strikingly different existences.  It seems that the only thing they still have in common is their language and ethnicities.  When I was scrolling through this story, there were a few pieces that really stood out to me.  The first was that the Korean War technically hasn’t been formally concluded, which means that attacks on each other aren’t actually that out of the realm of possibilities.  The next thing was that North Korea’s birth rate is higher than South Korea’s, yet the population of South Korea is two times larger.  This reflects that the life expectancy of South Koreans is significantly longer and that their resources are used more efficiently.  Other statistics that stood out related to GDP.  Up until 1980 both North and South Korea’s GDPs were growing at basically the same rate.  But from that point forward, South Korea’s grew dramatically and North Korea’s actually decreased.  This leads up to today where the GDP of South Korea is $1.934 trillion and North Korea’s is only $40 billion.  Seeing as they are basically working with the same resources, since they share a similar geographic location, in most situations their GDPs would be even a tiny bit similar.  However, the way the economies of both countries are operated have created such a difference in their GDPs.  The infrastructure of the two countries are also wildly different.  The map of the two countries at night show that South Korea uses a lot of electricity, so practically the entire country is lit up.  North Korea is so dark that if I didn’t know that people lived there, I would assume it was uninhabited by any humans.  The statistic regarding the percentages of roads paved vs unpaved in the two countries also shows the stark contrast between their infrastructure.  Only 3% of roads in North Korea are paved!  Whereas 92% of South Korea’s roads are paved.  The most unfortunate part of this whole situation is that there are millions of people who live in North Korea and must suffer with little hope of escaping while their South Korean neighbors generally enjoy a modernized life.  This story map shows that sharing a location does not really mean that two groups of people will live similar lives.
Douglas Vance's curator insight, April 20, 12:34 PM
This expertly created set of data points and maps clearly lay out the stark differences between North and South Korea. Also, it shows how both countries have resources the other needs and how cooperation or reunification can benefit everyone. However, this article shows how the dramatic differences between these two countries politically, economically, and socially make that highly unlikely. 
Zavier Lineberger's curator insight, April 26, 7:53 PM
(East Asia) This article explains the relationship between the Korean War and modern tensions. After WWII, the USSR occupied territory to the north of the 38th parallel and the US occupied the south. The governments of each half both claimed to be the true government of the whole peninsula until North Korea invaded the South, starting the Korean War. Communist China's entry forced UN and US troops into a stalemate at the parallel, eventually leading to an armistice establishing the DMZ, the most defended border in the world. In subsequent decades, North Koreans have dug tunnels under the DMZ to start a new invasion.

With Soviet help, Kim Il-sung created a military communist dictatorship in the north while the UN created a democracy in South Korea.

Despite common cultural heritage, there is a stark contrast between the two countries. The north has half the population, a higher birth rate, and a life expectancy 12 years lower, displaying the country's mismanagement. While the South has free press, free travel, and is the strongest economy in Asia, North Korea subjugates through punishment and is almost completely isolated. North Koreans have little access to food, electricity, and roads.

North Korea has developed a more aggressive policy in the last decade. Many successful missile tests have been made, including one fired over Japan into the Pacific Ocean last year. Even China, North Korea's one ally, has imposed sanctions on the country. Some think a peaceful solution is still available, while others watch the USA-NK Twitter war in anticipation.
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How Does the U.S. Census Bureau Define Rural?

"The U.S. Census Bureau has designed a multimedia application experience, a story map, called 'Rural America: How Does the U.S. Census Bureau Define Rural?' This story map contains interactive web maps, tables, information, and images to help explain how the Census Bureau defines 'rural.' Many rural communities rely on American Community Survey (ACS) 5-year estimates, rather than ACS 1-year estimates, because of population thresholds. This story map helps data users understand the history and definition of 'rural.' Watch this video and then visit the story map to learn more." Visit the Story Map: http://go.usa.gov/x8yPZ  


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 17, 2017 11:19 AM

Census geography brings statistical data to life as seen in their newly designed interactive story map, called "Rural America: How Does the U.S. Census Bureau Define 'Rural?" Not only does this story map helps explain how the Census Bureau defines rural, but it displays some fantastic data that helps students to explore rural America.  Many APHG teachers refer to unit 5 as the "ag unit" but the full title, Agriculture, food production, and rural land use, certainly does highlight why this can be a valuable resource.  

 

Tags: rural, census, regions, mappingESRIStoryMap.

Matt Manish's curator insight, February 16, 10:57 PM
The U.S. Census Bureau defines "rural" as an area with less than 50,000 people living in it. The majority of the United States is actually considered rural while a small minority of the country is labeled as urban. But interestingly enough, most rural areas are clustered around urban areas rather than in random locations. It seems as though the further out one ventures out from the center of an urban area like a major city, the more the population begins to decrease. One can also see in the same situation, the area transition from urban to rural. U.S. Census data can tell us a lot about populations in rural and urban areas and the correlation between them which can be important to know for many reasons.
Frances Meetze's curator insight, September 10, 1:19 PM
population
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The Real Threat to Hinduism: The Slow Death of India's Rivers

The Real Threat to Hinduism: The Slow Death of India's Rivers | Global Studies & AP HuG | Scoop.it

Hinduism shares an intricate, intimate relationship with the climate, geography, and biodiversity of South Asia; its festivals, deities, mythology, scriptures, calendar, rituals, and even superstitions are rooted in nature. There is a strong bond between Hinduism and South Asia’s forests, wildlife, rivers, seasons, mountains, soils, climate, and richly varied geography, which is manifest in the traditional layout of a typical Hindu household’s annual schedule. Hinduism’s existence is tied to all of these natural entities, and more prominently, to South Asia’s rivers.

 

Hinduism as a religion celebrates nature’s bounty, and what could be more representative of nature’s bounty than a river valley? South Asian rivers have sustained and nourished Hindu civilizations for centuries. They are responsible for our prosperous agriculture, timely monsoons, diverse aquatic ecosystems, riverine trade and commerce, and cultural richness.  Heavily dammed, drying in patches, infested by sand mafia and land grabbers, poisoned by untreated sewage and industrial waste, and hit by climate change — our rivers, the cradle of Hinduism, are in a sorry state.

 

If there is ever a threat to Hinduism, this is it. Destroy South Asia’s rivers and with it, Hinduism’s history and mythology will be destroyed. Rituals will turn into mockery, festivals, a farce, and Hinduism itself, a glaring example of man’s hypocritical relationship with nature. The fact that we worship our rivers as mothers and then choke them to death with all sorts of filth is already eminent.


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Douglas Vance's curator insight, April 23, 12:36 PM
The threat to Hinduism seems to in a way be a self inflicted wound. Despite the bias of the article and some of the crackdowns on certain religious practices in India, the fact is that Hinduism's inseparable ties to nature and rivers puts it in a tenuous position as the population of India explodes. If something isn't done to preserve and clean up these rivers, Hinduism may be at risk of destroying itself both figuratively and possibly quite literally. 
Zavier Lineberger's curator insight, April 24, 12:57 PM
(South Asia) With a population of 1.3 billion people, India is bound to have serious problems with pollution. But pollution has a profound impact on a religion closely tied with nature and geographic locations for thousands of years. Rivers that were previously seen as the "nurturers of Hinduism" are now drying up because of climate change or are polluting the area. The destruction of Indian rivers is not given proper public attention and the loss of rivers could lead to the loss of Indian history and the meaning of Hindu culture.
Nicole Canova's curator insight, May 1, 1:21 AM
Religion is shaped by the geography of the region in which it develops.  For example, Hinduism is heavily influenced by the rivers of India, and these rivers are considered holy places sites and places of cleansing and purification.  However, the cleansing power of the rivers is diminished by pollution that makes it unsafe to take part in ritual bathing.  Pollution, climate change, and deforestation are also having an impact on other aspects of Hinduism, which is about celebrating nature in it's entirety, including monsoons, forests, and agriculture.  As nature continues to be negatively impacted by human activity, many aspects of Hinduism will also be negatively impacted.
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Capital Jerusalem

Capital Jerusalem | Global Studies & AP HuG | Scoop.it

"Because Israel refused to recognize the U.N. plan for an internationalized Jerusalem and because of its annexation of occupied East Jerusalem in 1967, no country in the world has offered legal and diplomatic recognition of Jerusalem as the capital of Israel. Most states, however, have unofficially acknowledged Israel's sovereignty and actual possession, without recognition of lawful title."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, December 6, 2017 9:16 AM

That is, until now.  The United States is planning to move it's embassy from Tel Aviv to Jerusalem, in a move that will have far more reaching implications than the relocation of just about any other embassy on Earth could have, given the geopolitical significance of Jerusalem to the Israeli-Palestinian conflict and the broader international ties.  Below are some resources to contextualize this shift: 

 

Questions to Ponder: How does this change the status quo at the local, national and international scales?  What might be some of the consequences of this move?  What would you recommend and why?  

 

Tags: Israel, Palestine, borders, political, Middle East, geopolitics, historical.

Richard Aitchison's curator insight, March 7, 9:12 AM
It was a major move by the Trump administration with far reaching complications.  Now it if you take out all of the past history in the area and all of the future political/military problems in the area does it make sense to recognize Jerusalem as the capital, well yes. However, in this world that we live in it surely is not that simple. With the past, current, and future arguments in the area between Israel and the Palestine's this further creates a rift between both and probably takes us further away from a resolution. From a geography and economic perspective Jerusalem would be a great central location in which to work from, however since there is so much contested space there it simply does not work. It isn't always the best place from a geographical standpoint (although in an ideal world that be perfect), but the one in our current political climate that makes the most sense for ones own country. This is a decision that we will have to look back at for the next decade or so and see eventually the impact that it will have on the current situation. 
Douglas Vance's curator insight, March 22, 12:36 PM
The decision by the US to move its embassy to Jerusalem and recognize the city as the capital of Israel totally and absolutely undermines almost any chance at a two state solution. With this declaration, the US has taken sides and the idea that a two state solution with a Jerusalem under international government has essentially vanished. Even if the US were to reverse their decision in the future, the damage has already been done. 
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Globalization, Trade, and Poverty

What is globalization? Is globalization a good thing or not. Well, I have an answer that may not surprise you: It's complicated. This week, Jacob and Adriene will argue that globalization is, in aggregate, good. Free trade and globalization tend to provide an overall benefit, and raises average incomes across the globe. The downside is that it isn't good for every individual in the system. In some countries, manufacturing jobs move to places where labor costs are lower. And some countries that receive the influx of jobs aren't prepared to deal with it, from a regulatory standpoint.

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Marilyn Ramos Rios's curator insight, November 13, 2017 8:52 AM
Is globalization good thing or not?
Ivan Ius's curator insight, November 13, 2017 11:32 AM
Geographic Thinking Concepts: Pattern and Trends; Interrelationships; Geographic Perspective;
Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, November 29, 2017 8:51 AM
Globalization, Trade, and Poverty
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Kazakhstan to switch from Cyrillic to Latin alphabet

Kazakhstan to switch from Cyrillic to Latin alphabet | Global Studies & AP HuG | Scoop.it

"Kazakh was written in Arabic script until 1920 when it was substituted by the Latin alphabet. In 1940, it was replaced by a Cyrillic one. 'Given that over 100 countries in the world use the Latin script, it is crucial for Kazakhstan's integration into the global educational and economic environment,' said Gulnar Karbozova.

The former Soviet Republic declared independence in 1991. Its state language is Kazakh, a member of the Turkic family.

Yet, Russian is widely spoken across Kazakhstan and is its second official language."


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Kelsey McIntosh's curator insight, March 31, 3:15 PM
This article explains how the country of Kazakhstan will be switching their alphabet, as the title suggests. Originally using the Kazakh alphabet, the president has declared that they will be using the Latin Script. They argue that this will help with Kazakhstan’s “integration into the global educational and economic environment”
brielle blais's curator insight, April 1, 2:18 PM
This showcases how important a countries language is. It allows the country, in this case Kazakhstan, to have their own sort of identity, which can be seen in having extra letters in their alphabet that are certain Kazakh sounds. However, is it also important to be on the same grounds as other countries, many using the latin alphabet, because it makes the economic environment and education situations easier which other countries. 
othni lindor's curator insight, Today, 3:29 AM
This article talk about Kazakhstan's decision to switch from Cyrillic to Latin alphabet. Kazakhstan is the second official language in Russia. "Kazakh was written in Arabic script until 1920 when it was substituted by the Latin alphabet. In 1940, it was replaced by a Cyrillic one. The current Cyrillic alphabet consists of 42 characters - 33 characters of the Russian alphabet and nine characters for specific Kazakh sounds. The plan for the switch to Latin reportedly centers on an alphabet of 32 letters, with some specific sounds of the Kazakh language to be covered with the use of apostrophes." This change will take time for everyone to adjust and makes it harder for someone who is learning the language. The whole country will have to makes changes to adjust to the new alphabet. 
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Pie Chart of the World’s Most Spoken Languages

Pie Chart of the World’s Most Spoken Languages | Global Studies & AP HuG | Scoop.it

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Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, November 29, 2017 8:50 AM
Pie Chart of the World’s Most Spoken Languages
Ziggi Ivan Santini's curator insight, November 30, 2017 4:00 AM

This infographic is a great way to visualize the dominant languages on Earth.

LLewe LLyn Cooper's curator insight, January 14, 10:07 PM
Languages all over the world
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Somalia: The Forgotten Story

Part I: The story of Somalia's decline from stability to chaos and the problems facing its people at home and abroad.

Part II: The ongoing civil war has caused serious damage to Somalia's infrastructure and economy. Thousands of Somalis have either left as economic migrants or fled as refugees. Within Somali, more than a million people are internally displaced.

 

Tags: devolution, political, states, unit 4 political, migration, refugees, Somalia, Africa.


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Why is Bulgaria's population falling off a cliff?

Why is Bulgaria's population falling off a cliff? | Global Studies & AP HuG | Scoop.it
What is life like in the country projected to have the world's fastest-shrinking population?

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 22, 2017 2:24 PM

This is a good case-study to show how demographic decline coupled with economic decline, with exacerbate problems with a  consistent out-migration flow.   

 

Tags: Bulgaria, declining populationpopulationmigration.

Frances Meetze's curator insight, September 10, 1:18 PM
population

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Classifying languages is about politics as much as linguistics

Classifying languages is about politics as much as linguistics | Global Studies & AP HuG | Scoop.it
CROSS the boundaries of the former Yugoslavia and you face a few hassles.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, August 26, 2:30 PM

The linguistic differences between languages can be slight, but if politics and identity are involved (as they invariably are), these small linguistic differences can seem massive.  "Languages" can occasionally be dialects with their own armies.  

 

Scoop.it tags: languageculture, borders, political, Croatia, Serbia, Bosnia, Slovenia.

WordPress TAGS: language, culture, borders, Croatia, Serbia, Bosnia, Slovenia.

K Rome's curator insight, October 6, 7:37 PM

The linguistic differences between languages can be slight, but if politics and identity are involved (as they invariably are), these small linguistic differences can seem massive.  "Languages" can occasionally be dialects with their own armies.  

 

Scoop.it tags: languageculture, borders, political, Croatia, Serbia, Bosnia, Slovenia.

WordPress TAGS: language, culture, borders, Croatia, Serbia, Bosnia, Slovenia.

Nancy Watson's curator insight, October 12, 10:23 AM
Political unit 
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Peru gives landlocked Bolivia a piece of Pacific coast to call its own

Peru gives landlocked Bolivia a piece of Pacific coast to call its own | Global Studies & AP HuG | Scoop.it

"It might be a strip of sand without even a jetty but a small stretch of the Pacific coast now harbors Bolivia's dream of regaining a coast and becoming a maritime nation. The landlocked Andean country has won access to a desolate patch of Peru's shoreline, fueling hopes that Bolivia will once again have a sea to call its own. President Evo Morales signed a deal yesterday with his Peruvian counterpart, Alan García, allowing Bolivia to build and operate a small port about 10 miles from Peru's southern port of Ilo. The accord, sealed with declarations of South American brotherhood, was a diplomatic poke at Chile, the neighbor that seized Bolivia's coast and a swath of Peruvian territory in the 1879-84 war of the Pacific."


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Albahae Geography's curator insight, July 22, 10:48 AM
Unit 4
dustin colprit's curator insight, September 29, 10:24 PM
Having access to a coast provides many benefits to a country. If Peru follows through and allows Bolivia use of the coast, both countries may profit from the deal. If Bolivia is unable to gain access to the coast it will continue to be dependent on neighboring countries.   
Kelvis Hernandez's curator insight, September 29, 10:40 PM
A deal between the two countries of Peru and Bolivia giving the latter a small stretch of land to call their own. This is a win for Bolivia who had been left without a coastal shore since Chile took their land in the late 19th century during the War of the Pacific. As both a sign of friendship and a dig on Chile, Peru leased out a "1.4 square mile patch of sand" to Bolivia for 99 years. Morales, the leader of Bolivia, knows how much a port would do for the country being able to export more goods, dock naval vessels and bring more trade and investment into the country. 
 
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South Africa Is Still Under Apartheid

"More than two decades after the end of apartheid in South Africa, Cape Town remains racially segregated, with many black residents living in substandard townships."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 28, 5:08 PM

The title is a bit inflammatory--news agencies may pretend that they aren't in the shock-and-awe, clickbait economy, but they invented the salacious headline to grab our attention.  Still, the racial inequities of a system as pervasive as apartheid aren't going to be reversed in a generation and the racial differences in Capetown are coming under more international scrutiny as the they are in the midst of their current drought.

 

Tags: South Africa, Africarace, ethnicityneighborhood, urban, planning, drought, water, urban ecology.   

Matt Manish's curator insight, May 2, 11:26 PM
One can see from this video that Apartheid still exists in some parts of South Africa such as Cape Town. From the drone footage in this video, one can see how divided Cape Town's landscape is from a bird's eye view. You can see how the black community lives in the part of town that is made up of mainly shacks. Right next door, you can see that the white community lives in the suburbs with regular housing and lush trees located adjacently to the black community's village of shacks. It's not just the residential areas of Cape Town that is segregated. Even in the heart of the city, a real racial tension between blacks and whites can be sensed,. Resulting in the majority of the black community being less successful than the white community. One can clearly see that even though Apartheid has officially ended, the tension between blacks and whites still exists in this part of South Africa.
Kelsey McIntosh's curator insight, May 3, 9:34 PM
This video looks into the still segregated town of Cape Town, located in South Africa. Although it was racially segregated by apartheid in the 20th century, Apartheid was outlawed in 1994. Since then, it has been claimed that Cape Town has become more diverse. This is only true to some extent. Because of the apartheid, it was nearly impossible for Blacks and People of Color to get jobs in the city. Therefore, the different races now inhabit their own neighborhoods, however the segregation still lingers. In most white neighborhoods, they enjoy beautiful and safe lifestyles while the poorer neighbors can’t even afford running water or electricity. Tags: South Africa, Africa, race, ethnicity, neighborhood, urban, planning, drought, water, urban ecology.
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Italy's regional divisions

"150 years after its unification, Italy remains riven by regional differences." For more of these videos, visit http://arcg.is/1IeK3dT


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brielle blais's curator insight, March 25, 1:18 PM
This showcases geography because it is an example of how a country can be so divided even though everyone is from the same homeland. However, to Italians, their geographic location in Italy is very important. People take a lot of pride in which region they are from, whether it's between the politics of the north and south Italy or the different dialects spoken between the different regions. The divided is also seen economically as northern Italy is wealthier, and southern Italy is filled with more poverty and unemployment. 
tyrone perry's curator insight, April 18, 11:18 PM
The disunity in Italy has been going on for centuries.  With the north and south basically completely different and divided.  The north is wealthier than the south.  Dialect and language even differ With the two. In the south poverty and unemployment is high.  A Majority of italys prime ministers came from the north.  Many people in the north want to to get full independence for the south.
Stevie-Rae Wood's curator insight, October 3, 1:11 PM
Originally Italy was broken up into vast amounts of city states. However, they were eventually able to unify Italy. To thus day Italy still has significant political differences. Generally the North has always been more affluent than the South. Poverty and unemployment rates are much higher in the South of Italy. Italy also has strong regional dialects that sometimes do not even resemble Italian dialect that contributes to there political differences. The North in recent years has also been calling for full Independence. It seems that if someone doesn't solve Italy's economic issues and tries to unite the nation Italy may divide as a country.
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Hong Kong's 'coffin homes' reveal a housing crisis

Hong Kong's 'coffin homes' reveal a housing crisis | Global Studies & AP HuG | Scoop.it
A shortage of developable land have pushed Hong Kong's housing prices skyward, leading some to live in spaces the size of closets.

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Matt Manish's curator insight, February 16, 8:35 PM
The photo gallery in this article helps to give an accurate depiction of the housing crisis in Hong Kong with many people living in units that are 4 by 6 feet. Many families have to live in separate units because they are so small and can't usually fit more than one person. The bright side of the housing crisis in Hong Kong is that these "coffin homes" allow people to live in the major city at a cheaper cost, although it definitely comes with a hefty price with such tiny living quarters. The future looks positive though, as Hong Kong promises to build over 400,000 new homes over the next decade. This will help improve the housing crisis and hopefully phase these "coffin homes" out of existence once and for all.
Richard Aitchison's curator insight, March 29, 9:31 AM
Now this is a major housing crisis. I thought apartments in NYC were small, but nothing like this. In Hong Kong they have what is called "coffin homes" they are stacked on top of each other to try to fit as many in as possible. With increasing population and just 7% of the land properly zoned for housing it caused a major crunch in the housing market. Currently prices are going for $1,350 per square foot. Obviously this is a major problem and causes living conditions to be brutal especially for the elderly or for families that have to split up due to space. So what to do to fix this problem? Well one would say just make more land available for housing, well that comes with problems as well. There probably is a reason that there is limited land for housing due to geographical issues. So yes we can build more homes, but would we run into new problems such as natural disasters that cause more debt for the people in the country. There definitely needs to be a solution for these people, but it might not be so simple. I will never go back to NYC now and say how small the apartments are, because well you could be in Hong Kong.
Zavier Lineberger's curator insight, May 2, 9:17 PM
(East Asia) Unlike Singapore's regimented government housing, Hong Kong faces a severe housing crisis, forcing hundreds of thousands of people to live in tiny 4 by 6 foot homes. Hong Kong has a population of 7.3 million but only 7% of the city is cleared for housing. Therefore, landlords have to get creative. Stacking these "coffin homes" one on top of another is a great way to save space while providing the bare minimum housing. The coffin homes, little more than closets, have no windows or room to move around. Skyrocketing housing prices have caused extremely dense buildings as the elderly, disabled, young, and poor are forced to move in.
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We’re creating cow islands

We’re creating cow islands | Global Studies & AP HuG | Scoop.it
The parts of the United States that have higher populations of dairy cows are in the West and northern states.

 

Milk has moved away from cities between 2001 and 2011. Red areas indicate less milk in 2011 than 2001, green areas mean more and a buff color designates a neutral milk region.

Almost every region where you see a dark red area indicating a sharp decline in production has a large and growing population center nearby.


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ava smith's curator insight, January 8, 11:24 PM
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Matt Manish's curator insight, February 16, 9:09 PM
I've never really wondered which parts of the country produce the milk I consume on a regular basis. But as the maps in this article show there are certain parts of country that are densely populated with cows for the sole purpose of producing milk. This article also indicates that the "cow islands" in the Southeastern part of the United States are becoming smaller, while the density of the "cow islands" in the Northern and Western parts of the country are increasing at a significantly steady rate. While reading this article, I learned more about where the most cows in the U.S. are producing milk and how that might affect the price of the milk I buy.
Colleen Blankenship's curator insight, February 19, 1:44 PM
How would this relate to the Von Thunen model we discussed?
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Za'atari Camp

Za'atari Camp | Global Studies & AP HuG | Scoop.it

"Spongebob Squarepants has been painted on the entire side of one caravan, and an Arabic phrase has been gracefully painted on another. This kind of incongruity I see throughout the camp. Two women are dressed in traditional full-length hijabs, for example, but the man behind them is wearing a Golden State Warriors t-shirt. A man in a robe encourages a donkey to pull a cart, yet right past him are young boys with smartphones huddled near a fence looking for better cell reception. A little further down the road and on my right I see a shoeless kid laughing and rolling a tire, but on my left, I spot a vast number of solar-powered panels. This constant juxtaposition is jarring and yet beautiful, and I am taken back by the energy of the place."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, December 14, 2017 9:19 AM

This is from the other Professor Dixon, my brother Shane, an ESL professor at Arizona State who travels abroad frequently to train ESL teachers around the world (he's taught MOOCs and is a rock star in the ESL world--trust me--he's awesome).  I was thrilled to hear that he would not only be going to Jordan, but working within the Za'atari refugee camp.  He's a keen observer of the cultural and urban landscapes. 

 

TagsMiddleEast, Jordan, political, refugees.

Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, December 14, 2017 10:01 PM

What is it like i a refugee camp? A juxtaposition of conflicting images. 

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Choosing a Map Projection

"Cartographers at National Geographic discuss how they select an appropriate map projection for the September 2012 magazine map supplement. --World maps usually center on the land, with the Pacific Ocean divided as bookends. To show each ocean as a whole with the least distortion for our 'Beneath the Oceans' supplement map, we used a map projection called an interrupted Mollweide centered on the Pacific."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 19, 2017 8:18 PM

There is no one perfect map projection that fits all circumstances and situations. Think of a situation in which this map projection would be an ideal way to represent the Earth and in another situation that same projection would give you an incredibly limited perspective.  This video provides good insight into how to choose a map projection for a cartographic project. Here is National Geographic's lesson using this video.

 

Tags: cartography, K12, geospatial, NationalGeographic, water

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When Rich Places Want to Secede

When Rich Places Want to Secede | Global Studies & AP HuG | Scoop.it
At the core of Catalonia’s separatist movement is an argument that a country’s better-off regions shouldn’t have to pay to cover their less productive counterparts.

 

As a relatively rich region with its own independence movement, Catalonia's not alone: A small set of secession movements in historically productive areas, most visibly in Europe, say they’d be better off on their own, and more are pointing to Catalonia's example to regain momentum.

The common wisdom used to be that separatist movements mostly came from weak minorities that rallied around racial or ethnic injustices. “With globalization, that changed significantly,” said Andrés Rodríguez-Pose, a professor of economic geography at the London School of Economics (LSE). “Virtually everywhere in the world,” movements have swapped out the “identity card” for the “economic card.”

Inequality between regions is baked into the entire concept of modern nationhood—if subsidizing poorer parts of a country were motivation enough to split off, every region would have done it by now. Plus, there are economic perks to staying together: Trade is easier across internal borders, and diversified regions diffuse risk.

 

Tags: Catalonia, economic, political, devolution, autonomy, Europe.


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Kelvis Hernandez's curator insight, September 5, 3:43 PM
Interestingly, this is something going on all over the world in many different countries. As different regions find themselves separated by economic or social inequality they look to secede. These tensions increased in Catalonia, and in the UK, and is also growing as we see different proposals for California and Texas to secede from the United States. 
Matt Danielson's curator insight, October 3, 3:45 PM
Catalonia separatist movement is one of the most prominent separatist movements in the world (along with Northern Ireland long standing issues). The people of Catalonia feel it is not fare for them to hold up the poorer areas of Spain, and wish for more autonomy. These economic reasons have pushed a large independence movement in the region of Catalonia. Against Spanish parliamentary wishes they attempted to hold a vote to secede. This vote was then broken up by force by Spanish police, and many were even arrested. Many fear this use of force could lead to more drastic measures of Catalonia independence. Though this most likely will not happen without heavy outside support.  
othni lindor's curator insight, Today, 2:33 AM
This article talks about the citizens of Catalonia wanting independence from Spain. Catalonia is one of the wealthiest regions in Spain. They contribute billions of dollars in taxes to Madrid. The citizens of Catalonia find it unfair that they have to help out poorer regions in Spain. However, if Catalonia was granted independence, it could lose up to 20% of their GDP overnight and this could also cause conflict. Many other countries are also following Catalonia's example in their separatist movement towards independence. 
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Which Countries Have Shrinking Populations?


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 28, 2017 4:02 PM

This video explores some of the impacts of a declining population on a country (for example, a smaller workforce, economic decline, and growing public debt).  Eastern Europe as a region is used as the principle example and the countries of Bulgaria, Moldova, and Japan are highlighted. 

 

Tags: declining populations, population, demographic transition model, models, migration, Bulgaria, Moldova, Japan.

Laurie Ruggiero's curator insight, May 29, 4:54 PM
Unit 2
Frances Meetze's curator insight, September 10, 1:18 PM
population
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A Postman's Worst Nightmare: The Streets Of Silver Springs Shores, Florida

A Postman's Worst Nightmare: The Streets Of Silver Springs Shores, Florida | Global Studies & AP HuG | Scoop.it
The map above shows just some of the streets of Silver Springs Shores, Florida possibly the worst place in the world to be a postman.

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Matt Richardson's comment, November 13, 2017 9:50 AM
In the decades before smartphones, I used to deliver pizza in a section of Porter Ranch that was very similar to this, albeit slightly smaller. It was horrible. The pizza was always cold.
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Europe's Population Change (2001 to 2011)

Europe's Population Change (2001 to 2011) | Global Studies & AP HuG | Scoop.it
The map provides a level of detail previously unavailable. It is the first ever to collect data published by all of Europe’s municipalities.

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Olivia Campanella's curator insight, October 1, 4:35 PM
Europe has been undergoing intense demographic change and this map is the first ever collect data published by Europe. How this map works:

The Dark Blue color shows average annual population fall of 2% or more

The Medium Blue shows the average annual population fall of between 1 and 2%

and Light Blue shows a fall of 1%. The areas in tan experienced no change at all.

Areas in Deep Red show a rise of 2% or more in population, while in areas of Medium Red (1-2%) and Pale Pink (1%).
K Rome's curator insight, October 6, 7:31 PM
Europe has been undergoing intense demographic change and this map is the first ever collect data published by Europe. How this map works:

The Dark Blue color shows average annual population fall of 2% or more

The Medium Blue shows the average annual population fall of between 1 and 2%

and Light Blue shows a fall of 1%. The areas in tan experienced no change at all.

Areas in Deep Red show a rise of 2% or more in population, while in areas of Medium Red (1-2%) and Pale Pink (1%).
othni lindor's curator insight, Today, 2:45 AM
This article shows the population patterns of Europe between 2001 and 2011. Many cities have had a high rise in average annual population of 2 percent or more. This map also shows that there has been more migration in northwest Europe. Citizens have left certain cities in search of better job opportunities. The population in Germany is sparse except in Berlin. Spain has had a big drop in population overall. Many people living in more rural regions have moved to cities and many others are moving to coasts for retiring or downsizing.