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Lies, Damn Lies And The Myth Of Following The Data

Lies, Damn Lies And The Myth Of Following The Data | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
We are told to follow the data and the truth will be revealed, but data tells many tales and it depends on the data and how you interpret it. It makes me wonder if anything is definitive if you can present two similar sets of data and draw wildly different conclusions, depending on your emphasis. That’s because data is a tool in the hands of humans and we can interpret it as we choose. And to be clear, this isn’t because we choose to be deliberately deceptive either, although that’s probably true sometimes. It’s because being human, we can bring unintended biases to the data.

It’s a huge conundrum in the age of big data. How do you find definitive answers when you can look at different data points on the same topic and come to different interpretations?

Via Brian Yanish - MarketingHits.com
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Gathering of data for it's own sake and then expecting it to reveal answers to unrecognized / unasked questions seems just plain ridiculous to me,. - It has surprised me from the beginning about the issue of Big Data, that data of any sort is gathered to validate / invalidate a hypothesis or to evaluate the characteristics of whether or not a process is in control.  Understanding what you are measuring and why needs to precede the gathering of the data, not after the fact.  

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Paul Monin's curator insight, December 7, 2014 3:35 PM

" [...] data tells many tales and it depends on the data and how you interpret it." Everything has been said ! The fact that our whole lifes will be sorted and organized according to the figures of our lives is not hazardous in itself. On the other hand, a misinterpretaiton of those datas could be very dangerous for individuals... 

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Next Gen NPD + / - Agile NPD for Hardware Development Teams

This presentation is an early draft of one of the chapters of the book that I am working on for Minimum Winning Game Plus. It is titled Next Generation New Pro…
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This presentation is an early draft of one of the chapters of the book that I am working on for Minimum Winning Game Plus. It is titled Next Generation New Product Development + => Agile NPD for Hardware Development Teams.
 
I did this research and project over a 2 year period drilling down into the details of how profitability for NPD teams and MRO (Maintenance, Repair and Overhaul) for Aviation, Aerospace and Defense firms is actually achieved and is based off of maximizing the processing all of the WIP of the MRO shop or the work packages of the NPD Hardware team. It contains the key metrics for managing NPD and MRO teams of Time to $, Time to Task Completion and Time to Solution Implementation as the necessary metrics.
 
Please keep in mind I am a Practitioner in my line of work as the Senior Managing Partner for a small Professional Services Firm where our emphasis and skill set is in the field of Systematic Innovation for the Fortune 500.  
 
Have a look and let me know what you think.
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Intel Reportedly Won't Deploy EUV Lithography Until 2021

Intel Reportedly Won't Deploy EUV Lithography Until 2021 | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Intel will reportedly delay its introduction of EUV until 2021, while TSMC and Samsung hope to have the tech online by 2019.
Richard Platt's insight:

Intel’s already-rough process technology ramp took another hit last week. According to Mark Li, an electronics engineer and analyst with Bernstein, the company will delay its introduction of Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography (EUV) until 2021. That’s several years after rivals TSMC and Samsung are expected to have the technology in play — maybe.  The problem is related, at least in part, to the general delays that have hit Intel’s 10nm line. Because it takes years to fit a foundry for a new process node and to bring new tools online, these companies make plans for the specific characteristics of each node years in advance. It’s not impossible to retrofit a node with new technology, but it’s both expensive and time-consuming. Since process node advances are typically tied to the introduction of new technologies and refined manufacturing techniques as opposed to any single physical metric of semiconductor feature size, it makes both business and marketing sense to align the introduction of new technologies with the introduction of new nodes. This is particularly true for EUV, which requires very different manufacturing conditions and tolerances compared with standard 193nm ArF lithography.

We first reported on rumors that Intel’s 10nm would be delayed back in 2015. Imagine if the company had hit its original target and begun launching 10nm in 2016. With Tick-Tock still ticking along, 7nm would’ve arrived in 2018 – 2019 (bearing in mind that Intel’s process nodes have tended to hit more aggressive targets that map to smaller nodes at rival foundries). If Intel could’ve kept to this timeline, 7nm and EUV would’ve arrived synonymously for it, the same way they have (more or less) for Samsung and TSMC. But Intel’s timeline did slip — and with its 10nm node introduction pushed back to holidays 2019, the company won’t be able to introduce EUV until the 7nm node, currently planned for 2021.

The reason there’s a “maybe” attached to all of this is that EUV is the original “real soon now” technology. The first papers proposing soft x-ray imaging were published in 1988. The first national program for the development of EUV began in 1995 – 1996. Intel’s first roadmap slide, published in 2000, called for the introduction of EUV in manufacturing by 2004 or sooner. Fourteen years later, we’re still waiting for the manufacturing tools to catch up with the capabilities the semiconductor industry needs them to deliver.

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Haptic armband lets you feel the sensation of stroking in VR

Haptic armband lets you feel the sensation of stroking in VR | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Virtual reality has a long way to go before it feels like reality. The visual part is getting more immersive with the new VR headsets, but things like the sense of touch are missing. Heather Culbertson hopes to change that.
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Virtual reality has a long way to go before it feels like reality. The visual part is getting more immersive with the new VR headsets, but things like the sense of touch are missing. Heather Culbertson hopes to change that.  At the University of Southern California Viterbi School of Engineering, Culbertson and her team of graduate students are working on a “haptic” armband that gives you a sense of touch. It’s not using an actuator, which gives you a sense of buzzing like in typical video game controllers. Rather, Culbertson has engineered a prototype arm so that it feels like the sensation of a finger moving along your arm. I tried it out on a recent trip to Culbertson’s lab. The current prototype is a sleeve that wraps around your forearm and has a row of wired small speakers on it. It mimics the sensation of a finger moving along your arm.  “That’s what we focus on in this lab, a way to create hardware and signals that make haptic interactions feel natural, mimicking what you feel in real life, said Culbertson, who is an assistant professor of computer science, aerospace, and mechanical engineering. “With this device, it’s a set of voice coil actuators. These are capable of playing vibration. They’re essentially speakers.”  As Culbertson described it, I felt something like a soft touch moving up along my arm. She said it was a “pleasant sensation on the arm, a soothing, stroking sensation.”

No, we’re not going to start imagining what this could mean for virtual sex. It’s not going in that direction. Rather, the lab is looking to improve social VR, like when you tap someone on the shoulder to reassure the person. She calls it social haptics. The sense of touch can be surprisingly effective at things like decreasing depression or reducing stress.

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Johns Hopkins researchers use deep learning to combat pancreatic cancer

Johns Hopkins researchers use deep learning to combat pancreatic cancer | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Early detection is key to treatment, and with AI-enabled detection methods nearly a third of pancreatic cancer cases could be found four to 12 months sooner, they say.

Via Florian Morandeau
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Only 7 percent of patients live five years after diagnosis of pancreatic cancer, the lowest rate for any cancer, according to the American Cancer Society. Elliot K. Fishman, MD, a researcher and radiologist at Johns Hopkins, is on the forefront of trying to change this statistic, and he's using artificial intelligence to do it.

Fishman aims to spot pancreatic cancers far sooner than humans alone can by applying GPU-accelerated deep learning artificial intelligence to the task. Johns Hopkins is suited to developing a deep learning system because it has the massive amounts of data on pancreatic cancer needed to teach a computer to detect the disease in a CT scan. Hospital researchers also have NVIDIA's DGX-1 AI Supercomputer.

Fishman is helping train deep learning algorithms to spot minute textural changes to tissue of the pancreas and nearby organs. These changes often are the first indication of cancer. Deep learning detection methods could mean earlier diagnosis. Fishman estimates that nearly a third of the cases he sees could have been detected four to 12 months sooner.

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Florian Morandeau's curator insight, August 20, 1:12 AM

Artificial intelligence helps to diagnose pancreatic cancers far sooner than humans alone can.

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Verily researchers, former FDA commissioner call for device sensors, data analytics adoption in psychiatry

Verily researchers, former FDA commissioner call for device sensors, data analytics adoption in psychiatry | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Psychiatry has long stood as one of the more subjective areas of care, but new technologies and large-scale data generation and analysis may offer a more quantifiable approach to mental health treatment. In a recently published perspective, a group of Verily researchers and Former FDA Commissioner Dr. Robert Califf called for the psychiatric field to embrace digital sensors and the data sciences so that mental health practitioners can reduce the variability in outcomes that comes with intuition-based care.

Via Florian Morandeau
Richard Platt's insight:

Psychiatry has long stood as one of the more subjective areas of care, but new technologies and large-scale data generation and analysis may offer a more quantifiable approach to mental health treatment.  In a recently published perspective, a group of Verily researchers and Former FDA Commissioner Dr. Robert Califf called for the psychiatric field to embrace digital sensors and the data sciences so that mental health practitioners can reduce the variability in outcomes that comes with intuition-based care.

“For the most part, psychiatric practice continues to rely upon heuristic-based decisions that are frequently reinforced without good comparative evidence, and often for the sake of maintaining a therapeutic relationship for lack of a better alternative. At best, this approach allows practice to remain patient-centered, but at worst, this approach could be maintaining biases that are preventing patients from receiving optimal care,” the authors wrote in npj Digital Medicine. “We propose that today’s era of technological innovations in wearables and mobile devices offers a unique opportunity to redefine these limits of practice toward a new, data-driven future.”  Much in the way that oncology practitioners have begun to marry advanced in genetic testing and medical imaging with subjective symptom assessment, psychiatry could bring data from continuous monitors of activity, behavior, circadian rhythm, and other variables shown to be relevant to mental health, the authors wrote. Incorporating these resources would lead to a greater understanding of patients’ behaviors outside of the clinic, and allow for more targeted interventions informed by clear, measurable data.  To do so, the authors offered four major areas of focus: real-world data collection extending beyond clinical practice, investment in data science and analytics, transparency and empowerment of the patient’s experience (much in the way that consumer wellness apps are digestible and self-reliant), and education for clinicians in how integrating these tools will assist them in providing best psychiatric care.  “We believe that data-driven psychiatry is possible, and that digital measurement tools and analytics, as ‘objective yardsticks,’ can help catalyze this future. With appropriate attention to real world clinical outcomes, data science, patient experience, and the role of clinical judgment with respect to standard of care, psychiatric practice can leapfrog into a modern era already occupied by other medical fields. For the sake of future patients, there is no better time for this investment than today,” the authors concluded.

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Florian Morandeau's curator insight, August 24, 1:46 AM

Using digital sensors and the data sciences to reduce the variability in outcomes in intuition-based care.

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3D printed artificial limb returns amputees to water

3D printed artificial limb returns amputees to water | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it

The FIN was created by Northwell Health in collaboration with The Feinstein Institute for Medical Research (New York) and Eschen Prosthetic and Orthotics, a New York-based provider of …


Via Florian Morandeau
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Northwell Health, a not for profit healthcare organization in New York, announced a new study to manufacture and commercialize ‘The FIN’, an amphibious 3D printed prosthetic leg.  The FIN was created by Northwell Health in collaboration with The Feinstein Institute for Medical Research (New York) and Eschen Prosthetic and Orthotics, a New York-based provider of prosthetic services.

The prosthetic leg, made from carbon fiber enhanced nylon and 3D printed using 3HTI/Markforged’s printing technology, is compatible with land and water. This means that the FIN wearer can freely move in and out of the water without having to switch their prosthetic leg. Todd Goldstein, Prosthetic Designer at Northwell Health stated: “My hope is that this device creates unforeseen opportunities for amputees everywhere. This study is the first step in making this innovative prosthetic available to the millions of amputees looking to return to the water.”  For the study, 10 participants will provide data regarding underwater use and efficiency of the FIN.

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Florian Morandeau's curator insight, August 22, 1:08 AM

A new study to manufacture and commercialize ‘The FIN’, an amphibious 3D printed prosthetic leg.

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New AI System Sniffs Out Missed Tumors in Cancer Patients

New AI System Sniffs Out Missed Tumors in Cancer Patients | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Researchers developing new artificial intelligence tumor spotting system roughly 95 percent accurate -- a significant improvement from the 65 percent accuracy of most human radiologists.

Via TechinBiz
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When it comes to fighting cancer, nearly all technologies can be explored as potential solutions. Thanks to a team of engineers, doctors might have a new Artificial Intelligence (AI) program to help them and their patients fight against the deadly disease.

Researchers from the University of Central Florida's Center for Research in Computer vision created an AI with impeccable 'vision' for spotting small tumors in CT scans. Most human radiologists have a success rate of 65 percent in identifying smaller tumors on a scan, the team noted. This new AI system bumps that percentage up to 95 percent accuracy, giving the radiologists a second set of keen 'eyes' for them to use. 

Training the AI to sniff out tumors

Like many AI systems, it needed to learn what exactly a tumor looked like and how those tumors vary in different parts of the body.  “We used the brain as a model to create our system,” said Rodney LaLonde, a doctoral candidate. (In addition to being a computer science engineer, LaLonde also serves as captain of UCF’s hockey team.) LaLonde was assisted by Engineering Assistant Professor Ulas Bagci.   “You know how connections between neurons in the brain strengthen during development and learn? We used that blueprint, if you will, to help our system understand how to look for patterns in the CT scans and teach itself how to find these tiny tumors," LaLonde continued. 

The engineers took a cue from popular facial recognition algorithms, like the one found in the iPhone X. Most of that software continually scans faces in order to find a particular pattern, and in those patterns, eventually, finds a match. 

In this case, the team collaborated with the National Institute of Health and the Mayo Clinic to scan thousands of CT scans into their AI software. Each CT scan taught the AI what to look for in tumor size and shape, among other trademarks. 

Improving chances by improving technology

“I believe this will have a very big impact,” Bagci said. Bagci has worked extensively in biomedical imaging and machine learning, hoping to improve the state of clinical imaging. Before coming to UCF, he was the lab manager for NIH's Center for Infectious Disease Imaging Lab in Radiology and Imaging Sciences.

“Lung cancer is the number one cancer killer in the United States and if detected in late stages, the survival rate is only 17 percent," he explained. "By finding ways to help identify earlier, I think we can help increase survival rates.”

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Inventive Principles in Biology – the Parrot Fish - for more durable cutting and crushing

Inventive Principles in Biology – the Parrot Fish - for more durable cutting and crushing | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Darrell Mann Viewers of Blue Planet 2 were treated to the spectacle of parrotfish eating stony coral, only for it to emerge the other end as sand. Through
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Viewers of Blue Planet 2 were treated to the spectacle of parrotfish eating stony coral, only for it to emerge the other end as sand. Through this process, a single parrotfish can produce around 400 kilograms of sand every year. This digestive beach building would not be possible without the parrot-like “beaks” – actually made of modified teeth – that give these fish their name. The hardness of these teeth is equivalent to a stack of about 88 African elephants compressed to a square inch of space.

Matthew Marcus, a researcher at Berkeley Lab, wanted to investigate the structure of this fish’s beak to find out what endowed it with such strength.  ‘This is a fish that crunches up coral all day and is responsible for much of the white sand on beaches,’ Mr Marcus said.  But how can this fish eat coral and not lose its teeth?  In a recent paper published in ACS Nano, Marcus and his collaborators have revealed the source of the parrotfish’s powerful bite. Their findings even suggest future designs for materials that mimic the durability of parrotfish teeth. The researchers used X-ray techniques to reveal an ‘interwoven fibre nanostructure’. Crystals of a mineral called fluorapatite are woven together in a chain mail-like arrangement. It is this structure that gives parrotfish teeth their incredible durability.  ‘Parrotfish teeth are the coolest biominerals of all,’ said Professor Pupa Gilbert, a biophysicist at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and the leader of the study. ‘They are the stiffest, among the hardest, and the most resistant to fracture and to abrasion ever measured.’  Professor Gilbert suggests that ‘weaving crystals’ to imitate this structure could be a way of producing new synthetic materials. Efforts are already underway to replicate the structure of human tooth enamel artificially, but the teeth of parrotfish present an exciting opportunity to make something really durable. The properties shown by their teeth would make useful additions to mechanical components found in electronics, for example, which must often withstand a lot of strain.

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Sensors to Smartphones Bring Patent Wars to Diabetes Monitoring

Sensors to Smartphones Bring Patent Wars to Diabetes Monitoring | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Diabetes treatment has evolved since Mary Fortune was diagnosed in 1967 and hospitalized because there was no reliable way monitor her blood sugar. These days, a glucose skin patch transmits her levels day and night to her iPhone and shares the data with others.

Via Lionel Reichardt / le Pharmageek
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Diabetes treatment has evolved since Mary Fortune was diagnosed in 1967 and hospitalized because there was no reliable way monitor her blood sugar. These days, a glucose skin patch transmits her levels day and night to her iPhone and shares the data with others.   Fortune and other diabetics are benefiting from an explosion in technology and innovation, from under-the-skin sensors that eliminate the need for painful finger pricks, to smartphone alerts when glucose levels rise too high. But the technology, and its integration with mobile devices, has brought the types of lawsuits typically seen by Silicon Valley companies.   For glucose monitors alone, the number of published patent applications has grown steadily for a decade and has accelerated significantly since 2015, according to an analysis by the research firm Patinformatics. More than 880 patent applications related to glucose monitoring have been published so far this year, said Tony Trippe, managing director of the Dublin, Ohio-based company.  “Everybody in the market is realizing there’s an enormous opportunity there,” said Paul Desormeaux, a senior analyst with Toronto-based Decision Resources Group. “Other players are starting to come in, and there’s a lot of competition to make advanced products.”   The boom is driven by a variety of factors, Desormeaux said. The number of people with diabetes in the U.S. is rising -- the Centers for Disease Control estimates more than 100 million Americans are now living with diabetes or prediabetes. Insurance coverage for new devices has increased, and there’s a growing number of partnerships between health companies and traditional technology firms such as Alphabet Inc.’s Google, International Business Machines Corp., and Fitbit Inc.  Abbott Laboratories, Roche Holding AG, DexCom Inc. and Medtronic Plc are the top owners of patents, with San Diego-based medical device company DexCom having shown the highest rate of growth since 2015, Trippe said.  Desormeaux is projecting the market for continuous glucose monitors like those used by Fortune to reach $2 billion in 2026, up from $670 million in 2017. That figure doesn’t include devices like insulin pumps, smartphone applications, more traditional products like one-time blood tests, or projections for new products like an artificial pancreas.

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Artificial Intelligence Ushers in Human-Centric Engineering Discipline

Artificial Intelligence Ushers in Human-Centric Engineering Discipline | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
The broad umbrella of artificial intelligence could spawn a new branch of engineering that will help develop of AI systems and applications, much as civil and mechanical engineering helped develop tall buildings and airplanes over a century ago.
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Over the past several decades, artificial intelligence has been besieged by rounds of hype that over-promised, under-delivered and nearly killed the field. Once more, Gartner positioned machine learning and deep learning at the top of its hype cycle, and all the publicity and potential often leads to a “trough of disillusionment” if the technology fails to deliver. Now that AI is reaching a tipping point of market acceptance, it’s important to be cautious and not repeat past mistakes.  In “Artificial Intelligence – The Revolution Hasn’t Happened Yet,” University of California at Berkeley professor Michael I. Jordan injects such a note of caution. “The idea that our era is somehow seeing the emergence of an intelligence in silicon that rivals our own entertains all of us —enthralling us and frightening us in equal measure,” he writes. “Whether or not we come to understand intelligence any time soon, we do have a major challenge on our hands in bringing together computers and humans in ways that enhance human life.” Tools have played a critical role in the evolution of humans since our ancestors first developed stone tools a few million years ago. “We shape our tools and they in turn shape us,” observed noted author and educator Marshall McLuhan in the 1960s. Similarly, the machines of the 21st century digital economy are making up for our cognitive limitations, augmenting our intelligence, problem solving capabilities and ability to process vast amounts of information. Machine learning and deep learning are the latest examples of tools that are helping us cope with and take advantage of the huge amounts of information all around us. Mr. Jordan argues that we are witnessing the creation of a new branch of engineering that will help us in the development of AI systems and applications, much as civil and mechanical engineering helped us develop tall buildings and airplanes over a century ago. Before the advent of these engineering disciplines, buildings and bridges were developed in fairly ad-hoc ways, and were much less safe and subject to collapsing in unforeseen ways. Over time, engineering advances have led to foundational scientific principles, development practices and building blocks that significantly increased their safety and productivity.  AI is in this ad-hoc, early stage. Tools and best practices have started to emerge, as well as a number of sophisticated mathematical techniques such as those underly deep learning. However, “what we’re missing is an engineering discipline with its principles of analysis and design…”, Mr. Jordan notes. “Moreover, since much of the focus of the new discipline will be on data from and about humans, its development will require perspectives from the social sciences and humanities.”

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22 states ask US appeals court to restore net neutrality, with tech company support

22 states ask US appeals court to restore net neutrality, with tech company support | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
The battle to restore net neutrality protections continues as 22 states plus the District of Columbia have asked a US appeals court to reinstate the 2015 rules – with support from a number of tech …
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The battle to restore net neutrality protections continues as 22 states plus the District of Columbia have asked a US appeals court to reinstate the 2015 rules – with support from a number of tech companies …  In all, the states – which include California, Illinois, New Jersey, New York, North Carolina, Pennsylvania and Virginia – represent more than half the US population. A who’s who of tech luminaries and tech giantshave also expressed their support for net neutrality, Apple among them.  Reuters reports that the latest move was led by New York, which was the first to file a lawsuit over the issue.  The states, led by New York Attorney General Barbara Underwood, filed a lawsuit in January after the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) voted in December along party lines to reverse rules that barred internet service providers from blocking or throttling traffic or offering paid fast lanes, also known as paid prioritization […]  The states argue the FCC reversal will harm consumers. The states also suggested the FCC failed to identify any “valid authority” for preempting state and local laws that would protect net neutrality.  A number of tech companies have filed a separate lawsuit also aimed at overturning the FCC ruling.  [These include] Mozilla, Vimeo, Etsy, and numerous media and technology advocacy groups.  So far, three states have ignored the FCC ban on creating their own net neutrality laws, and six state governors have signed executive orders.  The Senate has voted to keep net neutrality, with efforts now focusing on the far tougher challenge of getting it through the House.

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Blockchain Enters 'Trough of Disillusionment' on Gartner's Hype Scale

Blockchain Enters 'Trough of Disillusionment' on Gartner's Hype Scale | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Interest in blockchain technology is waning, research firm Gartner said in its latest "Hype Cycle for Emerging Technologies" report.
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Interest in blockchain technology is waning, research firm Gartner said in its latest "Hype Cycle for Emerging Technologies" report.  Gartner included blockchain, along with four other emerging technologies, as one of five trends that can blur the lines between humans and machines, according to a news release on August 20. Blockchain technology is at the edge of the "trough of disillusionment" phase in the cycle, though it predicts that the technology may reach the "plateau of productivity" within the next decade.  The "trough of disillusionment" means that "interest [in the technology] wanes as experiments and implementations fail to deliver. Producers of the technology shake out or fail. Investments continue only if the surviving providers improve their products to the satisfaction of early adopters," as explained on Gartner's website.  Mike Walker, research vice president at Gartner, said in a news release that "digitalized ecosystem technologies are making their way to the Hype Cycle fast," adding: "Blockchain and [internet of things] platforms have crossed the peak by now, and we believe that they will reach maturity in the next five to 10 years, with digital twins and knowledge graphs on their heels."  The "shift from compartmentalized technical infrastructure to ecosystem-enabling platforms," as written in the news release, is building the fundamentals for unique business models as the technology stabilizes in the future.  In addition to blockchain technology, which is part of the "digitalized ecosystems," four other distinct emerging technology trends that are listed on the hype cycle are "democratized AI," "do-it-yourself biohacking," "transparently immersive experiences" and "ubiquitous infrastructure," according to the release.

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How Paper Batteries Charged by Bacteria Could Power Internet of Things

How Paper Batteries Charged by Bacteria Could Power Internet of Things | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
By integrating bacteria into paper batteries, researchers create a cheap, sustainable way to power billions of sensors and devices
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The explosive growth of miniaturized electronics and batteries to power everything from ingestible healthcare devices to sensors for intelligent transportation is driving innovation in how those devices are designed, and raising concerns over their environmental impact.  By some estimates, more than 50 billion electronic devices may be deployed during the next five years. Many will have a short working life, their fast obsolescence resulting in a disposal issue.  Enter papertronics, which offer electronics engineers the benefits of flexibility, sustainability, eco-friendliness, and low cost, as well as useful mechanical, dielectrical, and fluidic properties.  Seokheun Choi, associate professor in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the State University of New York at Binghampton, and his colleagues have created a paper-based, single-use battery that relies on bacteria both to generate an electric current and also to devour the battery at the end of its useful life.

In a paper published in the journal Advanced Sustainable Systems, the authors write that lithium-ion batteries and supercapacitors offer a high energy density, are light weight, and are capable of being integrated into flexible substrates. But they point out that Li-ion batteries also are made with nonbiodegradable and often toxic materials that often require energy-intensive and potentially environmentally damaging manufacturing processes.  Alternative energy harvesting techniques such as solar cells, nanogenerators, and thermoelectric generators contain large amounts of nonrenewable and nonbiodegradable heavy metals and polymers.

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46 Corporations Working On Autonomous Vehicles

46 Corporations Working On Autonomous Vehicles | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Beyond trendy names like Tesla and Alphabet chasing self-driving cars, a host of auto brands and other tech heavyweights are also investing in autonomous R&D.

Via Karolina Maria Chachulska
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46 Corporations + 10,000 startups

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Karolina Maria Chachulska's curator insight, September 4, 8:11 PM

46 Corporations + 10,000 startups

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Semiconductor Industry: From A Blockbuster To A Netflix Model?

Semiconductor Industry: From A Blockbuster To A Netflix Model? | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Semiconductors are the best performing industry over the past five years. The semiconductor industry has traditionally been highly cyclical, but is now moving t
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Summary: Semiconductors are the best performing industry over the past five years.  The semiconductor industry has traditionally been highly cyclical, but is now moving toward a new model that is more closely tied to the health of the global economy.   The industry is evolving to more of a portfolio model — selling chips into many different products, spreading returns across a greater number of assets. James Picerno recently made an overview of the 5-year annualized return of 135 exchange-traded products covering US and foreign stocks, bonds and real estate, along with funds targeting commodities and currencies. The best performer? Semiconductors!

 
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Memory ICs to Account for 53% of Total 2018 Semi Capex

Memory ICs to Account for 53% of Total 2018 Semi Capex | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Richard Platt's insight:
IC Insights forecasts total semiconductor capital expenditures will rise to $102.0 billion this year, marking the first time that the industry has spent more than $100 billion on capital expenditures in one year.  The $102.0 billion spending level represents a 9% increase over $93.3 billion spent in 2017, which was a 38% surge over 2016.  Figure 1 shows that more than half of industry capital spending is forecast for memory production—primarily DRAM and flash memory—including upgrades to existing wafer fab lines and brand new manufacturing facilities. Collectively, memory is forecast to account for 53% of semiconductor capital expenditures this year. The share of capital spending for memory devices has increase substantially in six years, nearly doubling from 27% ($14.7 billion) in 2013 to a forecast of 53% ($54.0 billion) of total industry capex in 2018, which amounts to a 2013-2018 CAGR of 30%.  Of the major product categories shown, DRAM/SRAM is forecast to show the largest increase in spending, but flash memory is expected to account for the largest share of capex spending this year (Figure 2).  Capital spending for the DRAM/SRAM segment is forecast to show a 41% surge in 2018 after a strong 82% increase in 2017.  Capital spending for flash memory is forecast to rise 13% in 2018 after a 91% increase in 2017.

 

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Nine dermatology-focused digital health platforms

Nine dermatology-focused digital health platforms | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it

Spruce and Klara, companies originally in the dermatology space, have pivoted, both to some form of healthcare communication. Still, the field continues to grow. 


Via Florian Morandeau
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Smartphone and computer cameras have opened up new possibilities for dermatology.

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Florian Morandeau's curator insight, August 23, 1:13 AM

Smartphone and computer cameras have opened up new possibilities for dermatology.

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MIT researchers make advances with sensor implants

The technology, in progress at the university's CSAIL institute, could help locate cancer and guide deployment of internal treatments.

Via Florian Morandeau
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ReMix, a new technology in the works at MIT's Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory, seeks to make progress toward a new paradigm of treatment – one that's less reliant on endoscopy and surgery, but instead relies on sensors and what scientists call an "in-body GPS" to help make diagnoses and guide drug administration.  The goal, researchers said, is a new approach to patient care that's less expensive, invasive and time-consuming than has been previously been possible.  MIT has always been a pioneer in envelope-pushing medical advances, of course. Recently much of its focus has been on AI and machine learning. CSAIL researchers, for example, have recently been exploring ways AI can be deployed to improve electronic health records, streamlining ICU data and helping with predictive models.

ReMix, which is being developed with help from with clinicians at Massachusetts General Hospital, depends on complex algorithms to work, but also leverages other technologies – spotting the location of ingestible implants by way of low-power wireless signals.  MIT professor Dina Katabi has pioneered the use of such signals to detect subtle movements and even vital signs from a distance. CSAIL researchers have tested the ReMix on animals and were able to show that the technology can track implants accurately, within a centimeter or so. The aim is for similar techniques to someday be used in human patients, helping target drugs to specific parts of the body.  In their initial testing of ReMix, the researchers implanted a small sensor in the animal and used a wireless device that reflects radio signals to track it. They deployed a specific algorithm to pinpoint the location of the marker – which doesn't have to transmit a signal of its own, only to reflect the one aimed at it by the wireless device.  The challenge, MIT scientists said, is that wireless signals can bounce off many parts of a human body – and are significantly more powerful reflecting off the skin than on any implantable markers. So they developed a small semiconductor that helps differentiate different signals by  combining them and allowing the filtering of irrelevant frequencies.  That said, there's plenty of room for ReMix to be honed and fine-tuned before its ready to use in clinical settings – its location accuracy would need to be down to millimeters, rather than centimeters – but CSAIL researchers say they're interested in how this "GPS" could help locate tumors, for instance, or one day guide the precision application of proton therapy for a wider array of cancers than is currently possible.  The plan next is to combine wireless signals with other data such as MRI scans, helping hone the system's accuracy, and to do further research to assess the how the algorithm can account for the diverse complexities among different patients' physiologies.  "We want a model that’s technically feasible, while still complex enough to accurately represent the human body," Deepak Vasisht, a PhD student a CSAIL and lead author of a new paper on MIT's ReMix research. "If we want to use this technology on actual cancer patients one day, it will have to come from better modeling a person’s phy

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Florian Morandeau's curator insight, August 22, 1:06 AM

An "in-body GPS" to help make diagnoses and guide drug administration.

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IoT Strategies for improving healthcare

IoT Strategies for improving healthcare | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
The Internet of Things is impacting on many industries, including healthcare. Each industry presents different challenges. A new survey offers advice for those working in the healthcare sector seeking to brig connected technologies on-line.

Via Florian Morandeau
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The so-called Internet of Medical Things is designed to transform the way medical equipment operates. This has been enabled through most hospitals having both wired and Wi-Fi enabled equipment, from intravenous-pumps to X-ray machines; and from telemetry monitors to hand wash detectors.  By exploiting the Internet of Medical Things, healthcare professionals can segment and monitor devices in real-time. This allows for systems to be checked that they are secure; to assess if they are working properly; and to collect data relating to patient health and treatments.  According to analysts Hit Consult, the big challenge for healthcare arises because most “organizations are learning the hard way is it’s difficult to stitch together cloud-based solutions with hard-wired legacy devices and systems.”  The analysts offer five strategies to make the development of the Internet of Medical Things easier. These are:

 1.  Focus on Network Infrastructure First
Many healthcare organizations make the mistake of seeking to establish an Internet of Things ecosystem at the wrong place, which is often with application-related initiatives. Instead IT departments need to understand the ins and outs of the network and how each device will operate within it.
 2.  Use Device Visibility and Data Analytics
 All too often organizations do not have the visibility necessary to know where the connected medical devices are in the network and how they are functioning. A review the basics is necessary, such as knowing whether a new device is operating properly and what data is it transmitting. Therefore, visibility and intuitive data analytics are critical.
 3. Secure Your Network via Segmentation
 The security of healthcare Internet of Things is a very important requirement to preserve the privacy and safety of patients. To protect systems from an external attack it critical to structure your network to prevent security breaches. This is best achieved by segmentation or partitioning of the network.
4.  Make Monitoring a Top Priority
 Routine observation and tracking of devices connected to the network is important and this means monitoring all the devices and applications on the network continuously.
 5.  Unify Your Onboarding Approach
 A core strategy for Internet of Things success is to avoid disjointed approaches, especially those arising from multi-departmental initiatives.
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Florian Morandeau's curator insight, August 24, 1:42 AM

IoT is designed to transform the way medical equipment operates in the coming years.

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Inventive Principles in Biology – How the Hummingbird Uses Inventive Principles to do its in-flight Aerobatics

Inventive Principles in Biology – How the Hummingbird Uses Inventive Principles to do its in-flight Aerobatics | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Darrell Mann The sight of a tiny hummingbird hovering in front of a flower and then darting to another with lightning speed amazes and delights. But it
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You might think that if the hummingbird simply beats its wings fast enough and hard enough it can push enough air downward to keep its small body afloat. But, according to the simulation, lift production is much trickier than that. For example, as the bird pulls its wings forward and down, tiny vortices form over the leading and trailing edges and then merge into a single large vortex, forming a low-pressure area that provides lift. In addition, the tiny birds further enhance the amount of lift they produce by pitching up their wings (rotate them along the long axis) as they flap.  Hummingbirds perform another neat aerodynamic trick – one that sets them apart from their larger feathered relatives. They not only generate positive lift on the downstroke, but they also generate lift on the upstroke by inverting their wings. As the leading edge begins moving backwards, the wing beneath it rotates around so the top of the wing becomes the bottom and bottom becomes the top. This allows the wing to form a leading-edge vortex as it moves backward generating positive lift.

According to the simulation, the downstroke produces most of the thrust but that is only because the hummingbird puts more energy into it. The upstroke produces only 30 percent as much lift but it takes only 30 percent as much energy, making the upstroke equally as aerodynamically efficient as the more powerful downstroke.  Large birds, by contrast, generate almost all of their lift on the downstroke. They pull in their wings toward their bodies to reduce the amount of negative lift they produce while flapping upward.  Although hummingbirds are much larger than flying insects and stir up the air more violently as they move, the way that they fly is more closely related to insects than it is to other birds, according to the researchers.  Insects like dragonflies, house flies and mosquitoes can also hover and dart forward and back and side to side. Although the construction of their wings is much different, consisting of a thin membrane stiffened by a system of veins, they also make use of unsteady airflow mechanisms to generate vortices that produce the lift they need to fly. Their wings are also capable of producing positive lift on both upstroke and downstroke. They do this by twisting the orientation of the wing between the up and downstrokes, and so, if we watch the tips of the wing, they move in a figure 8 pattern.

From a conflict solving perspective, the problem the hummingbird has to overcome is a classic force-versus-speed problem. The bird needs to generate lift (Force), but, with a normal bird wing pattern, can only generate lift on the downstroke and thus needs to be able to spend as little time in the upstroke as possible – i.e. by upstroking as quickly as possible. Here’s what that problem looks like when mapped on to the Matrix:  Principles 13 (The Other Way Around), 15 (Dynamics – twisting the wing), 9 (prior-counteraction – micro-vortices) and 12 (Equi-potentiality) all fit what the hummingbird is doing. You can see all four strategies in action by checking out the simulation video here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Dg8xg4U7Xqs

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Cloud Storage Services Market will Project a Remarkable CAGR of 15.9% During 2017-2022

Cloud Storage Services Market will Project a Remarkable CAGR of 15.9% During 2017-2022 | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it

Via massimo facchinetti
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Cloud storage is a basic and adaptable approach to store, access along with offer data over the Web. A cloud storage supplier, for example, Amazon Web Services maintains the system associated software and hardware, while the user can arrange and utilize as per requirement through a web application. Utilizing cloud storage disposes of the procurement and administration expenses of purchasing and keeping up of the individual’s storage infrastructure, gives worldwide scale, increases agility and conveys anyplace, anytime access to information.  So Global Consumer Cloud Storage Services will Project a Remarkable CAGR of 15.9% During 2017-2022.  Few types of cloud Storage are block storage, file storage and object storage which are used by various age categories including >=40 years, 18-40 years and <18 years. The storage tier includes >=10 TB, 1 TB – 9.99 TB and 50 GB – 999 GB.

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New facial recognition system catches first imposter at US airport

New facial recognition system catches first imposter at US airport | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
New facial recognition tech at an airport near Washington, DC caught a man attempting to enter the US with false documents, the US Customs and Border Protection said yesterday. While arriving in Washington Dulles International Airport after a flight from São Paulo, the man presented a genuine French passport as his ID. But the facial recognition system flagged the man’s face as not matching the passport photo.
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New facial recognition tech at an airport near Washington, DC caught a man attempting to enter the US with false documents, the US Customs and Border Protection said yesterday.

While arriving in Washington Dulles International Airport after a flight from São Paulo, the man presented a genuine French passport as his ID. But the facial recognition system flagged the man’s face as not matching the passport photo. Officers then searched his person, as he grew “visibly nervous,” and found his real ID card from the Republic of Congo in his shoe. The man left the US after the US attorney’s office decided not to prosecute him.

The system had just been installed on Monday, so this was the first instance where it caught a person illegally entering the US. There are a total of 14 airports using the facial recognition technology to screen out people arriving in the US with false documents.  Dulles Airport has been testing facial recognition systems since 2015, while New York’s JFK Airport started to test the technology in 2016. Both airports are part of the broader biometric exit pilot that uses facial recognition to identify visa holders as they exit the country.   Customs and Border Protection is still assessing whether travelers in the future could use biometrics to verify their identities instead of presenting boarding passes and ID documents, the agency said in a statement.

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More Profound understanding on why Companies eventually Die - "Does your job match your personality?" from Jordan Peterson on the Big Think

Read more at BigThink.com: http://bigthink.com/videos/how-important-is-it-that-your-job-matches-your-personality-extremely Follow Big Think here: YouTube
Richard Platt's insight:

An interesting, cogent and thought provoking video for the intelligent corporate and the techno-entrepreneurial engineers and managers out there.   Jordan Peterson, the clinical psychologist from the University of Toronto, of recent popularity, and controversy to some, speaks on the subject of different personality types and how they play out in a successful businesses and how that the "Creative" personalities, I call them techno-entrepreneurial people (who are High in Openness, a Big 5 personality test trait) who can be hard to manage get forced out over time by the "Managerial" (High in Conscientiousness trait) personalities, that is until the company starts to falter because the marketplace has changed and the "Managerial" personalities don't have the capacity to think along the lines of the techno-entrepreneurial types since the managerial types want and desire stability and control at the expense of divergent thinking that will be required to respond effectively to marketplace challenges.  To sum up the reason why so many of our most beloved firms fail is because management kicks out all of the techno-entrepreneurial people (and their divergent thinking) that enables the more effective response to the marketplace environment and the needs of the business to continue......this dynamic not likely to change anytime soon, however Jordan does make a more understandable and explainable case as to why so many firms fail. (and thus follows the rule of Occam's Razor  - known as the Law of Parsimony, which is the problem-solving principle that the simplest solution tends to be the right one.)

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AI spots legal problems with tech T&Cs in GDPR research project

AI spots legal problems with tech T&Cs in GDPR research project | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it

Technology is the proverbial double-edged sword. And an experimental European research project is ensuring this axiom cuts very close to the industry’s bone indeed by applying machine learning technology to critically sift big tech’s privacy policies — to see whether AI can automatically identify violations of data protection law.  The still-in-training privacy policy and contract parsing tool — which is called ‘Claudette‘: Aka (automated) clause detector — is being developed by researchers at the European University Institute in Florence.


Via Philippe J DEWOST
Richard Platt's insight:

Technology is the proverbial double-edged sword. And an experimental European research project is ensuring this axiom cuts very close to the industry’s bone indeed by applying machine learning techniques to critically sift big tech’s privacy policies — to see whether AI can automatically identify violations of data protection law.  The still-in-training privacy policy and contract parsing tool — which is called ‘Claudette‘: Aka (automated) clause detector — is being developed by researchers at the European University Institute in Florence.  They’ve also now got support from European consumer organization BEUC — for a ‘Claudette meets GDPR‘ project — which specifically applies the tool to evaluate compliance with the EU’s General Data Protection Regulation.  Early results from this project have been released today, with BEUC saying the AI was able to automatically flag a range of problems with the language being used in tech T&Cs.

The researchers set Claudette to work analyzing the privacy policies of 14 companies in all — namely: Google, Facebook (and Instagram), Amazon, Apple, Microsoft, WhatsApp, Twitter, Uber, Airbnb, Booking, Skyscanner, Netflix, Steam and Epic Games — saying this group was selected to cover a range of online services and sectors.  And also because they are among the biggest online players and — I quote — “should be setting a good example for the market to follow”. Ehem, should.   The AI analysis of the policies was carried out in June after the update to the EU’s data protection rules had come into force. The regulation tightens requirements on obtaining consent for processing citizens’ personal data by, for example, increasing transparency requirements — basically requiring that privacy policies be written in clear and intelligible language, explaining exactly how the data will be used, in order that people can make a genuine, informed choice to consent (or not consent).  In theory, all 15 parsed privacy policies should have been compliant with GDPR by June, as it came into force on May 25. However, some tech giants are already facing legal challenges to their interpretation of ‘consent’. And it’s fair to say the law has not vanquished the tech industry’s fuzzy language and logic overnight. Where user privacy is concerned, old, ugly habits die hard, clearly.  But that’s where BEUC is hoping AI technology can help.  It says that out of a combined 3,659 sentences (80,398 words) Claudette marked 401 sentences (11.0%) as containing unclear language, and 1,240 (33.9%) containing “potentially problematic” clauses or clauses providing

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Philippe J DEWOST's curator insight, July 10, 4:01 AM

When Claudette meets GDPR , we get an extremely interesting encounter between Artificial Intelligence and EU policy.

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How A Supercomputer Named Dr. Crusher Perfected Cancer Treatments For 21 Patients 

How A Supercomputer Named Dr. Crusher Perfected Cancer Treatments For 21 Patients  | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
A newly published study suggests that artificial intelligence can be used to select cancer treatments for individual patients based on their DNA and RNA profiles, but several obstacles must be overcome before the technology can be widely implemented.

Via Lionel Reichardt / le Pharmageek
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Sequencing tumor genes and then selecting treatments that target certain mutations is routine in the treatment of several tumor types, including breast and lung cancer. But it’s not common practice for treating hematological malignancies like multiple myeloma, even though oncologists who treat those diseases are well aware that each patient’s cancer has unique characteristics that may make it more or less responsive to certain targeted treatments.  Oncologist Samir Parekh and his colleagues at the Mount Sinai Icahn School of Medicine in New York wanted to change the treatment paradigm in multiple myeloma. So they developed a system that uses an algorithm to match up multiple myeloma patients with drugs that are already on the market to treat other cancers. They tried the resulting recommendations in a group of 21 patients with treatment-resistant multiple myeloma and got positive results in all but five—a response rate that’s so high Parekh believes the idea could be extended to many other cancers.  “The response was quite amazing, considering this was a challenging population that had pretty much failed every treatment out there,” says Parekh, director of translational research in myeloma at Mount Sinai. The study was published yesterday in the journal JCO Precision Oncology.   The technique that Parekh’s team employed is often called “multi-omics.” That means they didn’t just use genomic sequencing to scour the DNA of the patients’ cancers for targetable mutations, but they also sequenced their RNA. Because RNA plays a major role in the coding and expression of genes, it can also drive cancer, so they were confident the information they gleaned would point them to targets that might respond to existing drugs.  Problem was, they needed a supercomputer to produce all that data quickly, but they didn’t want to have to wait in line to access the shared technology that academic institutions like Mount Sinai generally use. “In myeloma, when patients relapse, we typically have a few days to a couple of weeks before we need to decide on a treatment,” Parekh says. “Otherwise the patients progress.”

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Why Every Organization Needs an AR Strategy - Prof. Michael Porter and PTC CEO Jim Heppelman

Michael Porter and Jim Heppelman explain how augmented reality will change how we work.

Via David W. Deeds, Aki Puustinen, Emeric Nectoux
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Professor Michael Porter and PTC's CEO Jim Heppelman explain how augmented reality will change how we work.

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David W. Deeds's curator insight, August 19, 1:57 AM

This is interesting. 

Emeric Nectoux's curator insight, August 19, 9:56 AM

A brillant demonstration of augmented reality’s impacts in our lives.