Internet of Things - Technology focus
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The Internet of Things and M2M – Some Predictions for a Bubbly Next Few Years | Blue Hill Research

The Internet of Things and M2M – Some Predictions for a Bubbly Next Few Years | Blue Hill Research | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Richard Platt's insight:

The best prognostication so far on IoT, where it is going and who is going to be using it - Definitely a worthwhile read

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Cheryl Palmer's curator insight, February 19, 2015 9:41 PM

INTERNET OF THINGS - Blog post by Tony Rizzo,  a Blue Hill Researcher on where the Internet of Things is headed in the next year or two. Has links to source information and further research. Well written with data to back up predictions.  A really interesting post that makes me think about how the IoT will change the way we do business.

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73% of Executives Are Researching & Launching IoT Projects In 2017

73% of Executives Are Researching & Launching IoT Projects In 2017 | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
73% of senior executives are either researching or currently deploying IoT. The IoT platform market is expected to grow 35% per year to $1.16B by 2020. These and many other fascinating findings are from Verizon’s State of the Market: Internet of Things 2017, Making way for the enterprise
Richard Platt's insight:

Key takeaways from the study include the following:

  • Manufacturing-based IoT connections grew 84% between 2016 and 2017, followed by energy & utilities (41%). Transportation and distribution (40%), smart cities and communities (19%) and healthcare and pharma (11%) are the remaining three industries tracked in the study who had positive growth in the number of IoT connections. The following graphic compares year-over-year growth by industry for the 2016 to 2017 timeframe.
  • Manufacturing is predicted to lead IoT spending in 2017 with $183B invested this year. Verizon’s study predicts that transportation and utilities will have the second and third-largest capital expenses in IoT this year. Insurance, consumer and cross-industry IoT investments including connected vehicles and smart buildings will see the fastest overall growth in 2017.
  • The IoT platform market is expected to grow 35% per year to $1.16B by 2020. From well-established enterprise service providers to startups, the platform market is becoming one of the most competitive within the global IoT ecosystem. The design objective of all IoT platforms is to provide a single environment for enabling API, Web Services and custom integrations that securely support enterprise-wide applications. Please see the post What Makes An Internet Of Things (IoT) Platform Enterprise-Ready? for an overview of the Boston Consulting Group’srecent IoT study, Who Will Win The IoT Platform Wars?
  • Improving the customer experience and excel at customer service by gaining greater insights using IoT leaders enterprises’ investment priorities. 33% of enterprises interviewed prioritize using IoT technologies and the insights it’s capable of providing to excel at customer service. 26% intend to use IoT technologies to improve asset management and increase Return on Assets (ROA) and Return on Invested Capital (ROIC). Consistent with how dominant manufacturing’s investment plans are for IoT this year, production and delivery capabilities are the top deployment priority for 25% of all businesses interviewed.
  • IoT has the potential to revolutionize pharmaceutical supply chains by drastically reducing drug counterfeiting globally. It’s estimated that counterfeit drugs cost the industry between $75B to $200B annually. The human costs of treating those who have been sold counterfeit drugs back to health are incalculable. IoT platforms and systems have the potential to drastically reduce the costs of counterfeiting, both on a personal impact and market standpoint. Drug manufacturers operating in the United States have until November 2017 to mark packages with a product identifier, serial number, lot number and expiration date, plus electronically store and transfer all transaction histories, including shipment information, across their distribution supply chains. Pharmaceutical manufacturers have a high level of urgency to make this happen and stay in compliance with the US Drug Supply Chain Security Act. IoT solutions are flourishing in this industry as a result.
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Does the world need a Tesla truck?

Does the world need a Tesla truck? | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Breaker one-niner, we’re gonna need a new slang word for this bobtail rig, over
Richard Platt's insight:

Tesla’s next big project: an all-electric semi truck with a rumored range of up to 300 miles. The big question is, does the world actually need this?  Elon Musk certainly thinks so. Earlier this week, he tweeted that the truck would “blow your mind clear out of your skull and into an alternate dimension.” Which seems like a totally fine and not at all hyperbolic way to manage expectations.

But the freight industry seems ambivalent at best. Trucking leaders say they welcome Tesla’s entry into the market, while acknowledging that their industry as a whole is clearly trending toward some form of electrification. But they also point out that truck manufacturers and operators have already embraced alternative fuel technologies, from natural gas to propane to hydrogen fuel cells. And battery-powered electric vehicles will face steep challenges, from weight restrictions to the availability of convenient charging stations, before they can be widely adopted.

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Using virtual reality Underwater is as weird and fun as it Sounds

Using virtual reality Underwater is as weird and fun as it Sounds | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Sure, you can soar or swim in VR. Just put on a headset and jump in a pool.

Via TechinBiz
Richard Platt's insight:

Go figure right, very cool idea, to get the weightlessness experience with VR. 

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Luis A. Trujillo Paz's curator insight, November 15, 12:44 PM
The next swim
Mohamed Touré's curator insight, November 15, 2:03 PM
je trouve ça très intéressant 
Mubashir Hussain's curator insight, November 16, 2:31 AM

Banner ad design is a powerful way to promote your business.

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AI is changing how Investors develop Successful Strategies

AI is changing how Investors develop Successful Strategies | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Technology has changed our lives in countless ways — there are more smartphones and other mobile devices in use in the United States and its territories than the entire population of the country, and we are just on the cusp of seeing driverless cars on our roads and highways. As the field of artificial intelligence continues to grow and improve, it too is poised to make radical changes in nearly every industry and sector of business — especially in investing.

Via TechinBiz
Richard Platt's insight:

Not a surprise, but yet go figure

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Mubashir Hussain's curator insight, November 16, 2:32 AM

Banner ad design is a powerful way to promote your business.

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The intelligence that leads to artificial intelligence

The intelligence that leads to artificial intelligence | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Artificial intelligence (AI) may be a hot topic today, but SEMI has helped to incubate Big Data and AI since its founding.
Richard Platt's insight:

Today, AI is akin to where IoT was yesterday in the hype cycle – popping up everywhere as a major consideration for the future. Neither IoT nor AI is hype, though – they’re the future. There is ever more at stake for SEMI members with AI. AI appears to be the next wave helping to maintain double-digit growth for the foreseeable future.  As part of its appeal for the global supply chain, AI can be a key silicon driver for three inflections that should benefit society. First, there is a massive increase in the amount of compute needed. Half of all the compute architectures shipping in 2021 will be supporting and processing AI.   Second, the Cloud will flourish and the Edge will bloom. By 2021, 50 percent of enterprise infrastructure will employ cognitive and artificial intelligence.  Third, new species of chips will emerge, such as the devices fueling IC content and electronics for the rapid growth of disruptive capabilities in vehicles and autonomous cars (as well as medical and agricultural applications, for example). There are also many more advantages created with and for AI as SEMI members enable new materials and advanced packaging.   What results can be measured from these changes for the global electronics manufacturing supply chain? More apps, more electronics, more silicon and more manufacturing.  On the other hand, the technologies alone create relatively little business value if the problems in our factories and markets are not well understood. There’s a great need to anticipate and guide AI. This requires a new kind of collaboration.  To address this need, SEMI’s vertical application platforms have been created for Smart Data (which is all about AI), and also for Smart MedTech, Smart Transportation, Smart Manufacturing and IoT. This higher degree of facilitated collaboration serves to cultivate multiple “smart communities” that accelerate progress for AI, better directing how connected networks and data mining can step up the pace for advancement of global prosperity. This process also provides members with access to untapped business opportunities and new players.​​

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Huawei and Gemalto team up to accelerate NarrowBand IoT deployments

Huawei and Gemalto team up to accelerate NarrowBand IoT deployments | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Gemalto and Huawei create a cost-effective solution for mass market IoT. To help device manufacturers meet a growing demand for long-lasting low-power NarrowBand (NB) IoT modules, Gemalto and Huawei - via its semiconductor arm, HiSilicon -

Via IoT Business News
Richard Platt's insight:

Gemalto and Huawei create a cost-effective solution for mass market IoT. To help device manufacturers meet a growing demand for long-lasting low-power NarrowBand (NB) IoT modules, Gemalto and Huawei - via its semiconductor arm, HiSilicon

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Industrial Internet Consortium (IIC) Testbed Advances Smart Factory Predictive Maintenance

Industrial Internet Consortium (IIC) Testbed Advances Smart Factory Predictive Maintenance | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Predictive maintenance, one of the most widely hyped Internet of Things (IoT) use cases, is getting a boost thanks to a testbed conducted by the IIC and its partners, which aims to advance availability and uptime for high-volume manufacturing.
Richard Platt's insight:

Predictive maintenance, one of the most widely hyped Internet of Things (IoT) use cases, is getting a boost thanks to a test bed conducted by the Industrial Internet Consortium (IIC) and its partners, which aims to advance availability and up-time for high-volume manufacturing.  The Smart Factory Machine Learning for Predictive Maintenance Testbed is being led by Plethora IIoT, a division of ETXE-TAR focused on Industry 4.0 solutions, and Xilinx, a semiconductor provider. The testbed will explore the application of machine learning techniques on predictive maintenance problems for high-volume production machinery. The goal: To increase uptime, improve energy efficiency, and detect system anomalies prior to failure.

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Ford reveals 'Iron Man' exoskeletons used by production line workers

Ford reveals 'Iron Man' exoskeletons used by production line workers | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
New mechanical exoskeletons being tested by Ford may help factory workers to function like bionic people, reducing the physical damage of millions of repetitive tasks over many years.

Via TechinBiz
Richard Platt's insight:

Robots have replaced many U.S. manufacturing workers, but new mechanical exoskeletons being tested by Ford may help factory workers to function like bionic people, reducing the physical damage of millions of repetitive tasks over many years.

The U.S. automaker said on Thursday that workers at two U.S. factories are testing upper-body exoskeletons developed by Richmond, California-based Ekso Bionics Holdings Inc, which are designed to reduce injuries and increase productivity.

The four EksoVests were paid for by the United Auto Workers union, which represents hourly workers at Ford, and the automaker plans tests for the exoskeleton in other regions including Europe and South America. 

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Mubashir Hussain's curator insight, November 10, 5:55 AM

kool design maker is a best professional organization which make all type of graphics product designing e.g banner ad design

Ines Costa Matos's curator insight, November 10, 9:25 AM

Daaaaaaaaaaamn! 

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Study Results: Serious Games As Digital Health Interventions

Study Results: Serious Games As Digital Health Interventions | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
 play2PREVENT Lab Study’s results published early September 2017 in the Journal of Medical Internet Research showed that PlayForward “Serious Game” was effective in improving positive attitudes about sexual health among adolescents

Following my previous post Jesse Schell On Serious Games @ Serious Play 2013, which covered PlayForward: Elm City Stories as a gold medal winner in the Healthcare/Medical category of the International Serious Play Awards, the Yale News has recently reported that “video games might soon have a place in classrooms as tools to help educate adolescents about public health issues.” 

Via Kim Flintoff
Richard Platt's insight:

With the value proposition of “harnessing videogame technology to shape stronger and healthier lives”, seven years ago Lynn Fiellin MED ’96, founder and director of the play2PREVENT Lab at the Yale Center for Health & Learning Games, received funding from the National Institutes of Health to study how video games might effectively combat public health issues among New Haven youth.   Play2PREVENT’s inaugural video game was PlayForward: Elm City Stories. Yale’s p2P initiative has partnered with Schell Games and Digitalmill to develop the game for the iPad, aimed at preventing HIV infection among ethnic minority adolescents. PlayForward is a serious role-playing videogame that engages youth with a variety of challenges and choices in fictional yet realistic life situations.  Led by Fiellin, the research team recruited more than 300 students, ages 11 to 14, from afterschool and summer programs in the New Haven area for the study.  During the one-year study period, the students were assessed for a range of outcomes, including sexual health attitudes, knowledge, intention to initiate sex, and sexual activity.  The findings validate the value of the Serious Game as a tool to engage and educate teens at risk for HIV and other sexually transmitted infections (STIs).

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Kim Flintoff's curator insight, October 25, 9:29 PM
play2PREVENT Lab Study’s results published early September 2017 in the Journal of Medical Internet Research showed that PlayForward “Serious Game” was effective in improving positive attitudes about sexual health among adolescents
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Cold Spray- Additive Manufacturing

Cold Spray- Additive Manufacturing | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
TWI has been developing cold spray technologies since 2003 and has invested considerable resource in exploring its potential as a method of additive manufacturing (AM).
Richard Platt's insight:

What is cold spray additive manufacturing?

Cold spray is the deposition of powder material onto a substrate using pressurised gas, usually at supersonic speeds. The gas used, primarily nitrogen or helium, is at high pressure and temperature – up to 70bar and 1100°C.

The ‘cold’ part of name of the process refers to the fact that the powders used are not melted; instead, the very high velocity causes the powder to plasticise on impact, forming a solid-state metallurgical bond with the substrate.

Cold spray forming has a much larger ’spot size’ than other powder-fed AM techniques, at around 4mm. It is therefore best suited for the addition of near-net-shape features onto components, such as bosses or lugs onto shafts, rather than forming intricate shapes based on CAD models.

Benefits of cold spray additive manufacturing

TWI’s cold spray AM services can reduce your costs and lead times compared to conventional manufacturing methods in a number of ways:

  • Eliminate the need to consider the effect of a heat-affected zone (HAZ) on the substrate properties
  • Eliminate the need to use a protective atmosphere when forming aluminium or titanium alloys 
  • Reduce material wastage by improving material utilisation ratio (buy-to-fly) and machining from near-net-shape parts, not large billets
  • Manufacture or repair small numbers of legacy and spare parts cost-effectively
  • Optimise materials and use graded or dissimilar materials within a single component to tailor performance

We can adapt the process for your needs, prioritising either deposition rate and thickness, or deposit density, depending on the application.

Where can cold spray additive manufacturing be used?

Cold spray is an effective way of making repairs and modifications to components. It can quickly transform the surface properties of a part or add new features.

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AFI KLM E&M Expands Predictive Maintenance Solution To APUs

AFI KLM E&M Expands Predictive Maintenance Solution To APUs | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Aftermarket provider’s Prognos software already used for engines and aircraft.
Richard Platt's insight:

AFI KLM E&M said the Prognos for APU program will be designed, built and marketed by its Epcor subsidiary, which specializes in APU repair and will utilize big data to monitor performance and predict faults in real time.  Set to launch at the beginning of September, the Prognos for APU software expands on previous incarnations of the solution for engines and aircraft.

“The innovation capabilities implemented in the AFI KLM E&M network, including at EPCOR, are based on our profile as an airline MRO, so that we can adapt as closely as possible to the real needs of our clients,” said Dennis Wetjens, Epcor  managing director.“ With Prognos for APU, Epcor is pitching a competitively differentiating, high value-added solution to the APU maintenance market, to help airlines maintain maximum control over their APU assets and keep them operating for as long as possible for minimum effort.”

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3D printer runs Linux on BeagleBone, focuses on ease of use

3D printer runs Linux on BeagleBone, focuses on ease of use | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
The “Voladd 3D Printer” features a Linux-driven BeagleBone SBC that connects to a cloud-based sharing site, plus a unique cartridge and cooling system.

Via Jinbuhm Kim
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The “Voladd 3D Printer” features a Linux-driven BeagleBone SBC that connects to a cloud-based sharing site, plus a unique cartridge and cooling system.

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3 Big Reasons to Get the Pixel 2 XL Over the Pixel 2

3 Big Reasons to Get the Pixel 2 XL Over the Pixel 2 | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
While both the Pixel 2 and Pixel 2 XL are great phones, the Google’s bigger phone is well worth the extra money. Here’s why.
Richard Platt's insight:

Samsung's DeX is a clever way to turn your phone into a desktop computer. However, there's one overriding problem: you probably don't have a good reason to use it instead of a PC. And Samsung is trying to fix that. It's unveiling Linux on Galaxy, an app-based offering that (surprise) lets you run Linux distributions on your phone. Ostensibly, it's aimed at developers who want to bring their work environment with them wherever they go. You could dock at a remote office knowing that your setup will be the same as usual.  It's not quite the same as your typical Ubuntu or Debian install. Linux on Galaxy launches through an app, and it's using the same kernel as Android itself in order to maintain performance. And it almost goes without saying that you'll really want a DeX setup, since most Linux apps are expecting a large screen, mouse and keyboard.  As it stands, you'll have to be patient. Linux on Galaxy isn't available right now -- you can sign up for alerts, but it's not ready for public consumption. Even so, this is good evidence that Samsung thinks of DeX as considerably more than a novelty feature. It may be a long, long while (if ever) before many people are using their phones as desktops, but Samsung is willing to gradually build up its ecosystem and eventually give you an incentive to take a second look.

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FCC votes to limit program funding internet access for low income communities

FCC votes to limit program funding internet access for low income communities | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
FCC Chairman Ajit Pai said before the vote that the purpose of the changes would help reduce “waste, fraud, and abuse that continue to plague the Lifeline program," but Democrats are skeptical.
Richard Platt's insight:

The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) took steps Thursday to roll back Lifeline — a program that subsidizes broadband and phone service for low income households.

The FCC voted in a 3-2 split along party lines favoring Republicans to reform the program during the agency’s monthly open meeting.

Republicans, including Sen. Roger Wicker (R-Miss.), praised the agency’s decision to begin pushing the program towards jurisdiction of the states.  “States play an important role in preventing waste, fraud, and abuse in federal programs, in addition to ensuring that people have access to essential communications services,” Wicker said in a statement on Thursday.  FCC Chairman Ajit Pai said before the vote that the purpose of the changes would help reduce “waste, fraud, and abuse that continue to plague the Lifeline program.”  In addition to pushing Lifeline authority to states, the changes also include the elimination of an extra $25 per month subsidy for individuals who live on tribal lands.  The FCC also voted in favor of considering a spending cap for Lifeline and baring resellers — telecom providers that rely on larger companies' network infrastructure — from offering Lifeline plans, but the agency is taking public comment on these items first.  Critics fear that a spending cap could limit the program's effectiveness and worry that reseller ban could make it hard for Lifeline recipients to find telecommunications providers that support the program.  

In July, the Government Accountability Office (GAO) released a report that found rampant fraud in the Lifeline program. In some cases, individuals that had deceased were still receiving money from the FCC.  Democrats don’t see the changes same way as Pai and Wicker do. They argue that claims of waste and abuse that have plagued the program are based on dated research and say that giving states more power in handling Lifeline will curtail access to internet for many poor communities.

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New tools from Google to make your job search simpler

New tools from Google to make your job search simpler | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Now directly in Search, you will have access to salary information for job postings, improved location settings, job application choices, and the ability to save individual jobs.
Richard Platt's insight:

To help the millions of people who turn to Google to start their job search, Google worked with leaders across the industry to introduce a new experience earlier this year. Since then, we’ve seen more than 60 percent of employers showing jobs in Search and connected tens of millions of people to new job opportunities. Now, based on feedback from job seekers, Google is introducing some new features to help make the process more efficient. Directly in Search, you can access salary information for job postings, improved location settings, job application choices, and in a couple of weeks, the ability to save individual jobs.

Salary is an important factor in finding the right job—but by our estimate, this information is missing from over 85 percent of job postings in the U.S. today. So to provide this essential information, we’re showing estimated salary ranges right alongside many jobs, based on the specific job title, location and employer. These are drawn from sources across the web like Glassdoor, PayScale, LinkedIn and more. For those jobs that do have a salary listed, we’ll show a comparison to the estimated range for that job, if available.   

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Customer Journeys & Big Data Insights Improve the Bottom Line

Customer Journeys & Big Data Insights Improve the Bottom Line | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Is big data enough? Aggregate numbers can tell you a lot, but they say very little about how individual customers are thinking and talking about…

Via Dr. Karen Dietz
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McKinsey analysis finds that companies acting on journey insights have seen a 15-20% reduction in repeat service visits, a 10-20% boost in cross-selling, and a drop of 10-25 basis points in churn.

Companies may feel they need to study all the bits and bytes available to them. But research shows that three to five journeys matter most to customers and the bottom line. They generally include: some combination of sales and on-boarding; one or two key servicing issues; (1) moving and account renewal, and (2) fraud, billing, and payments. Narrowing the focus to those journeys allows companies to cut through the data clutter and prioritize.

For instance, a cable television player used advanced data analysis of multichannel customer behaviors to focus on where drop-offs in the journey occurred in two journeys—on-boarding and problem resolution—to address nagging customer retention and loyalty issues. The data team helped them identify key service troubles spots and ways to improve the on-boarding process. Those insights led to several policy changes, including creating a “learning lab” that effectively operated as a mini-company to trial and refine new approaches. The changes improved customer satisfaction scores by more than 20%.

Fanderl also shares that you shouldn’t wait for the data to be perfect. Companies often hesitate to take action for fear their data is missing or a mess. Successful organizations tend not to overthink all the details and instead just roll up sleeves and get to work. Most companies, in fact, already have the data they need. The challenge is pulling the data together. Companies need to figure out where that data is stored, and what it takes to extract and aggregate it so they can understand the customer journey across multiple touch points. Since data often lives in systems managed by various functions, bring the necessary operations, IT, in-store sales, and marketing people together to identify the touchpoints.

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Dr. Karen Dietz's curator insight, November 13, 6:32 PM

Once you've got data, actionable insights from data, and have got a solution in mind to add business value to the organization, next comes customer journey maps.

 

Creating your customer journey map is essential to understand if their story and your product/service connect, and if you can deliver on your promise.

 

In this post colleague Sean Van Tyne, an expert in journey mapping, shares the interplay between data analytics and customer journey mapping. So cool.

 

At the end of the post he mentions the free 3-hour workshop we've got coming up on 11/30 in San Diego:  Solving the Data Gap: Your Roadmap from Data Insights to Real Results 

 

Enjoy the post and let me know if you want more info on the workshop.

 

This review was published by Dr. Karen Dietz for her Tech Leaders curation: www.scoop.it/t/tech-leaders 

Dr. Karen Dietz's curator insight, November 14, 12:58 PM

Here's a post connecting the dots between business storytelling, data insights, and customer journeys.

 

The author is colleague and customer experience expert Sean Van Tyne. He's makes great points about how to think of these 3 topic systemically.

 

We are facilitating a 3-hour free workshop on Nov. 30 here in San Diego that will dig more deeply into leveraging narrative for generating actionable insights from data that bring business value,  and how data and stories inform customer journeys.

 

The outcome? Influence, impact, and income.

 

Send me a note if you want an invite.

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Next Generation Solutions for IoT - Cost Modeling Solution Sets

Next Generation Solutions for IoT - Cost Modeling Solution Sets | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Richard Platt's insight:

“Breakthrough Technologies enabling the future of IoT” concluded that the future of IOT could depend on a chip that sells for less than 50 cents, that SoCs will need new kinds of memories, connectivity and sensors to scale to dimensions the IoT will demand, and that the path to get there is still unclear. 

 

See image for the presentation on “New Materials for Fan-out WLP,” Tony Flaim of Brewer proposed an interesting new fan out concept where cavities are laser drilled into a laminated sheet, chips are inserted face up into the cavities and thin film RDL is created over the chips as shown below.  (this has not been proved out, its a theoretical model)

 

IFTLE is not a big fan of making technology decisions based on cost modeling. The author's past experience has shown that he cost models that when used are generally very accurate when all the inputs are well known and not very accurate when the inputs are being “guestimated”. Having said that, he like's the slide presented by Chet Palesko of SavanSys Solutions on the general comparison of embedded die vs FOWLP vs TSV solutions shown in the article.  (However the idea of embedded die is not a new idea, but an old one, but hey that only means it will likely work really well).

 

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Fitbit data to be used in NIH’s precision medicine research #digitalhealth

Fitbit data to be used in NIH’s precision medicine research #digitalhealth | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
All of Us, the precision medicine research program run by the National Institutes of Health (NIH), will utilize data from the popular consumer wearable Fitbit, with 10,000 of the devices being provided to volunteers for one year.The devices used will be the Fitbit Charge 2 and Fitbit Alta HR devices.“The Fitbit devices selected track a combination of physical activity, sleep, and heart rate parameters,” said Eric Topol, founder and director of the Scripps Translational Science Institute. “The popularity of Fitbit devices among millions of Americans, combined with their ease of use, including multi-day battery life and broad compatibility with smartphones, made Fitbit a natural choice for this pilot program.”
Via Alex Butler, Lionel Reichardt / le Pharmageek
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The precision medicine research program run by the National Institutes of Health (NIH), will utilize data from the popular consumer wearable Fitbit, with 10,000 of the devices being provided to volunteers for one year.The devices used will be the Fitbit Charge 2 and Fitbit Alta HR devices.“The Fitbit devices selected track a combination of physical activity, sleep, and heart rate parameters,” said Eric Topol, founder and director of the Scripps Translational Science Institute. “The popularity of Fitbit devices among millions of Americans, combined with their ease of use, including multi-day battery life and broad compatibility with smartphones, made Fitbit a natural choice for this pilot program.”

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Future Shock: 3D Printed Bridge Meets Smart Sensors

Future Shock: 3D Printed Bridge Meets Smart Sensors | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Driven by the startup MX3D and backed by the Amsterdam City Council, the proposed 12-meter-long stainless steel bridge will use a smart sensor network from Autodesk and partners.
Richard Platt's insight:

Imagine using 3D printing to produce a fully-functional pedestrian bridge. What about constructing that bridge on-site using autonomous robots to output the complex steel structures in mid-air. As if that weren’t groundbreaking enough, consider throwing Internet of Things (IoT) technology into the mix to monitor the bridge’s health over time and glean insights that can help ensure bridge safety.   That’s not some pipe dream, that’s a bona fide bridge project currently underway in Amsterdam. Driven by the startup MX3D and backed by the Amsterdam City Council, the proposed 12-meter-long stainless steel bridge has been in development for a couple of years and got a boost this week with the news that Autodesk and partners were developing a smart sensor network that would leverage digital twin and machine learning technology to help make the first-of-its-kind 3D printed bridge smarter and safer.

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He Perfected a Password-Hacking Tool—Then the Russians Came Calling

He Perfected a Password-Hacking Tool—Then the Russians Came Calling | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
How a program called Mimikatz became one of the world's most widespread and powerful hacking tools.

Via Constantin Ionel Milos / Milos Constantin
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Five years ago, Benjamin Delpy walked into his room at the President Hotel in Moscow, and found a man dressed in a dark suit with his hands on Delpy's laptop.  Just a few minutes earlier, the then 25-year-old French programmer had made a quick trip to the front desk to complain about the room's internet connection. He had arrived two days ahead of a talk he was scheduled to give at a nearby security conference and found that there was no Wi-Fi, and the ethernet jack wasn't working. Downstairs, one of the hotel's staff insisted he wait while a technician was sent up to fix it. Delpy refused, and went back to wait in the room instead.

When he returned, as Delpy tells it, he was shocked to find the stranger standing at the room's desk, a small black rollerboard suitcase by his side, his fingers hurriedly retracting from Delpy's keyboard. The laptop still showed a locked Windows login screen.

The man mumbled an apology in English about his keycard working on the wrong room, brushed past Delpy, and was out the door before Delpy could even react. "It was all very strange for me," Delpy says today. "Like being in a spy film." It didn't take Delpy long to guess why his laptop had been the target of a literal black bag job. It contained the subject of his presentation at the Moscow conference, an early version of a program he'd written called Mimikatz. That subtly powerful hacking tool was designed to siphon a Windows user's password out of the ephemeral murk of a computer's memory, so that it could be used to gain repeated access to that computer, or to any others that victim's account could access on the same network. The Russians, like hackers around the world, wanted Delpy's source code.

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Brain-Sensing Sunglasses

Brain-Sensing Sunglasses | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Lowdown Focus sunglasses - Body tracking has become somewhat commonplace given the rise of fitness trackers, so the Smith Lowdown Focus sunglasses look to push this to th
Richard Platt's insight:

Body tracking has become somewhat commonplace given the rise of fitness trackers, so the Smith Lowdown Focus sunglasses look to push this to the next level with a new kind of sensing technology. Incorporating noninvasive EEG sensors, the sunglasses are able to track and measure your brain activity and send the data to the Smith Focus app when you are training. Users can then see detailed insights regarding their cognitive activity to help them further develop their level of focus and train with a more effective hand.  The Smith Lowdown Focus sunglasses identify the need for complex tracking technology for consumers that is discreet, results oriented and able to be easily incorporated into one's lifestyle without requiring major changes to schedule.

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This $20 security camera is aiming for the Nest Cam’s throne

When the Nest Cam — or the Dropcam, as it was known back then — was first introduced, it was something of a game changer. A security camera tha
Richard Platt's insight:

Nowadays, the Nest Cam stands in a more crowded arena. Logitech, Netgear, Samsung, and most of the other big names all have their own comparable offerings, all racing to bring the biggest feature set at the lowest price point.

A new challenger approaches! It’s called the Wyze Cam, and, as ridiculous as it seems, it’ll only cost $20 (before shipping, which varies a bit.)

Here’s the breakdown:

  • 1080p video recording, with infrared-based night vision
  • It has a magnetic base that can swivel/tilt to point the camera wherever it’s needed. You can sit it on a desk, or it comes with a sticky metal plate for popping it up in otherwise non-magnetic spots.
  • It can send alerts when it detects motion or sound, or, interestingly, when it hears the loud beeps of a smoke/carbon monoxide detector.
  • The price tag includes cloud-based “alert video” storage for the last 14 days on a rolling basis. It’ll push ~15 seconds of video to the cloud each time it detects motion/sound (as opposed to something like the subscription-based Nest Aware, which does continuous footage, storing everything recorded whenever the device is on.)
  • If you want continuous recording, you can stick a microSD card (not included) into the back. Continuous video is stored locally but can be accessed remotely through the app.
  • It has a microphone/speaker built in for 2-way audio.
  • The base unit costs $20 through Wyze Labs, plus ~$6 for shipping. If you buy it on Amazon with Prime shipping, the price gets bumped up to $30.

So how the hell is the company making money on a $20 HD security camera? Put simply: they probably aren’t. Not much, at least. Wyze Labs’ Director of Marketing Jessie Zhou was pretty upfront that the margins on this product are “extremely low”; she notes, though, that this is just a first step for the company. She says that Wyze Labs wants to make a bunch of different affordable smart home device. This first product is mostly meant to help them get the ball rolling and build their customer base

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Airline Cyclicality Now Driven By Capital Costs, Executives Say

Airline Cyclicality Now Driven By Capital Costs, Executives Say | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Sustained low fuel prices, more balanced demand reduces risk of downturn.
Richard Platt's insight:

That's the consensus of a collection of senior executives who shared their views with delegates at the recent Aviation Week Airline Engineering & Maintenance: North America conference here.  "Interest rates are the new fuel price," says Jonathan Berger, managing director of Alton Aviation Consultancy.

Fuel prices have been down substantially since mid-2014, and there is little indication that they will climb rapidly anytime soon. Airlines that revamped their long-term fleet strategies before this dip—notably the U.S majors that restructured after 9/11—built their business plans around much higher fuel costs, and are reaping the benefits.  "The fuel-cost assumption was set at $100 per barrel," Berger says. "It's down at $60. That's huge."

Another major historical cyclicality risk—an industry too heavily shaped by the fortunes in the once-dominant and now-mature North American and European markets—has also changed. The rise of the Middle East, recent financial headwinds notwithstanding, and continued emergence of the Asia-Pacific markets "means there is more balance," says Abdol Moabery, CEO of GA Telesis.  With demand spread out, a slump in one region is less likely to be a drag on others. This gives OEMs more options for re-allocating deferred orders and helps limit declines for MRO suppliers, such as parts producers, that are not dependent on a specific region.  Another factor mitigating the risk of a global slump is the airlines' increased focus on generating returns on their investments. Examples abound: Unprofitable routes are cut, bloated spares pools leaned out, used parts are welcomed, and—perhaps most significantly—capacity is kept in check. Through August, global airline revenue passenger kilometers were up 7.9% year over year, while capacity increased 6.5%, International Air Transport Association figures show. 

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It’s an Electric Bike on Water

It’s an Electric Bike on Water | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Unlike other watercraft, the Manta5 boasts an electric motor that enables riders to glide over water using pedal assist or simply throttling with no effort at a

Via cafonso
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Unlike other watercraft, the Manta5 boasts an electric motor that enables riders to glide over water using pedal assist or simply throttling with no effort at all, thanks to its carbon fiber hydrofoils, which make it ultra lightweight. The current prototypes can achieve an impressive 20km/h.

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Sue Walsh's curator insight, October 24, 7:23 PM
I want one!!
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Israel Hacked Kaspersky, Caught Russian Spies Hacking American Spies, But...

Israel Hacked Kaspersky, Caught Russian Spies Hacking American Spies, But... | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Israeli government hackers hacked into Kaspersky’s network in 2015 and caught Russian government hackers red-handed hacking US government hackers with the help of Kaspersky.
Richard Platt's insight:

Very interesting reading, that is if you like spies and counter terrorists stories that I've been reading about since the 1980's.  This stuff these days is about digital versions of those.  -- According to a story published today by the New York Times, Israeli government hackers hacked into Kaspersky’s network in 2015 and caught Russian government hackers red-handed hacking US government hackers with the help of Kaspersky.
In other words — Russia spying on America, Israel spying on Russia and America spying on everyone.

What the F^#% is going around?

It is like one is blaming another for doing exactly the same thing it is doing against someone else. Wow!   --  Well, the fact that everyone is spying on everyone is neither new nor any secret. However, somehow now Kaspersky Labs is at the centre of this international espionage tale for its alleged devil role.
Just last week, the Wall Street Journal, an American media agency, published a story against the Kaspersky, a Russian antivirus provider, claiming that the Russian government hackers stole highly classified NSA documents and hacking tools in 2015 from a staffer's home PC with the help of Kaspersky Antivirus.
Even if the incident is real, quoting multiple anonymous sources from US intelligence community, Wall Street Journal article failed to provide any substantial evidence to prove if Kaspersky was intentionally involved with the Russian spies or some hackers simply exploited any zero-day vulnerability in the Antivirus product.

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This is what a $10,500, 17-lens camera looks like

This is what a $10,500, 17-lens camera looks like | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
The Samsung 360 Round is also about the size of a Roomba.
Richard Platt's insight:

With 17 lenses and a $10,500 price tag, Samsung's 360 Round camera is not messing around.  Equipped with two pairs of eight lenses and one in the center staring up, the 360 Round is designed for pros and enthusiasts to capture and livestream 3D video and audio, specifically for creating VR content.   It's hefty, and about the size of a Roomba (when Samsung first announced it, I thought it looked like a many-eyed hockey puck, until I actually saw it with my own eyes).   Far outside the reach of the average Joe or Joanne, the 360 Round is still a notable foray into high-end capture from a company that's been steadily pushing into the consumer VR space with its lineup of Gear VR headset and 360 cameras. This is Samsung's way of inching a little bit deeper into the VR world.

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