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London Metropolitan Police officers to try out body cameras

London Metropolitan Police officers to try out body cameras | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it

Via Donald Maclean
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London police getting proactive about the use of wearable body cameras  - might be real good for better prosecution and be able to act as restraint for officers who might exceed their brief - we see this as a good use of tech that has multiple benefits

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Solving the Engineers Dilemma: Product Development Challenges - Updated 03/09/2018

The Engineer’s Dilemma: Product Development Problems * - Complicated problems (meaning multiple interdependencies) to solve * - Complex problems (meaning layer…
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My apologies a previous version was posted and then Slideshare broke the "re-upload" function, which prevented a clean transition to this updated slide deck.  Again my sincerest regrets for any confusion or difficulty with the previous posting..

 

The Engineer’s Dilemma:  Product Development Challenges

  • Complicated problems (meaning multiple interdependencies) to solve
  • Complex problems (meaning layered) to solve
  • High development and production costs
  • Long development and production cycle times
  • Sometimes multiple re/development cycles
  • And be innovative, so that the company has a competitive design
  • Step and repeat the above

 

 This dilemma is shared across most engineering disciplines, Electrical, Mechanical, Electro-Mechanical, Process and Manufacturing Engineering, as well as others.  Read the presentation on how other companies have addressed these issues for their engineers and their companies for competitive advantage.

   

There' was a FREE, sponsored workshop by IEEE, offered in Portland Oregon on March 10th, 2018 at 1201 Lloyd Blvd., Suite 200 at 8AM if you want to go see if this approach is useful for you the engineer or your engineering teams.  But if you want something  presented like this for your team, group, discipline, industry let me know, contact me via LinkedIn.

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New 'e-dermis' brings sense of touch, pain to prosthetic hands 

New 'e-dermis' brings sense of touch, pain to prosthetic hands  | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Amputees often experience the sensation of a "phantom limb"—a feeling that a missing body part is still there.

Via TechinBiz
Richard Platt's insight:

Amputees often experience the sensation of a "phantom limb"—a feeling that a missing body part is still there.  That sensory illusion is closer to becoming a reality thanks to a team of engineers at the Johns Hopkins University that has created an electronic skin. When layered on top of prosthetic hands, this e-dermis brings back a real sense of touch through the fingertips.  "After many years, I felt my hand, as if a hollow shell got filled with life again," says the anonymous amputee who served as the team's principal volunteer tester.  Made of fabric and rubber laced with sensors to mimic nerve endings, e-dermis recreates a sense of touch as well as pain by sensing stimuli and relaying the impulses back to the peripheral nerves.  "We've made a sensor that goes over the fingertips of a prosthetic hand and acts like your own skin would," says Luke Osborn, a graduate student in biomedical engineering. "It's inspired by what is happening in human biology, with receptors for both touch and pain.  "This is interesting and new," Osborn said, "because now we can have a prosthetic hand that is already on the market and fit it with an e-dermis that can tell the wearer whether he or she is picking up something that is round or whether it has sharp points."

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Amir Najam Sethit's comment, June 22, 7:31 AM
what a technology!
Grengar Pitter's comment, June 22, 9:53 AM
https://bit.ly/2KNolF9
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China Stops Buying the World's Trash, Leaving 120 Million Tons Up for Grabs

China Stops Buying the World's Trash, Leaving 120 Million Tons Up for Grabs | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Over 120 million tons of plastic trash will have to find a new home over the next decade, according to a new report.
Richard Platt's insight:

For decades, China has been buying the world’s trash and recycling it, but last year decided to bring that process to a halt. Under China’s new National Sword policy, several types of plastic scrap are no longer allowed into the country, which means it’s an open question where it’s all going to end up.  A new study published in the journal Science gives us an idea of the scale of the problem. According to the study, China’s new policy means that the rest of the world will have to find a way to deal with an additional 122 million tons of trash by 2030, assuming production doesn't slow down.  China has imported around 45 percent of the world’s plastic trash since they began the program in 1992. The U.S. alone exports around 4,000 shipping containers full of plastic to China every day, and now the U.S. and other countries need to find some other way of dealing with their garbage.

Already, that extra plastic waste is ending up in landfills, but this is perhaps one of the worst ways to handle the problem. Ideally, over the next few years the rest of the world starts building the kind of industrial recycling facilities that China has spent the last few decades operating, but it’s an open question how long it takes before those facilities are up and running.  The other option is that the U.S. and similar countries just do nothing, which means their excess plastic ends up in landfills and clogs the oceans. Hopefully it doesn't come to that because the situation is already bad enough as it is.

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Air Force Issues First Guidance to Troops About Space Force

Air Force Issues First Guidance to Troops About Space Force | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Air Force leaders have broken their silence following President Trump's order to create a new military service branch.
Richard Platt's insight:

Air Force leaders have broken their silence following President Trump's order to create a new military service branch for space.

Leaders issued a message to airmen telling them to stay the course as the process of implementing the president's guidance moves forward. Trump gave the order Monday during a speech to the National Space Council at the White House.  In a message to all airmen sent Tuesday night, service brass including Air Force Secretary Heather Wilson and Air Force Chief of Staff Gen. David Goldfein confirmed that, as rumored, the new "space force" would be established as a military service inside the Air Force.

It's an idea that Wilson and Goldfein have previously opposed publicly as too costly and presenting too many organizational challenges for the service.  In the new message, the leaders voiced agreement with Trump's position that the U.S. military approach to the space domain must become more robust to meet current and future challenges.  "The President's statement to the National Space Council adds emphasis to the Air Force position -- space is a warfighting domain and the entire national security space enterprise must continue to enhance lethality, resilience and agility to meet the challenge posed by potential adversaries," they wrote. "We look forward to working with Department of Defense leaders, Congress, and our national security partners to move forward on this planning effort."

Trump offered few details about the implementation of a space force in his announcement Monday, though he did say the Air Force and the proposed new service would be "separate, but equal."  Air Force leaders told airmen they should not expect any "immediate moves or changes" in the wake of the announcement, saying creation of the new force would take time.

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It's Official: Trump Announces Space Force as 6th Military Branch

It's Official: Trump Announces Space Force as 6th Military Branch | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
President Donald Trump has directed the Pentagon to create a "Space Force" as a new, sixth military branch.
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President Donald Trump has directed the Pentagon to create a "space force" as a new, sixth military branch to oversee missions and operations in the space domain. "We must have American dominance in space," Trump said during a speech at the National Space Council meeting, held at the White House on Monday. "I'm hereby directing the Department of Defense to immediately begin the process to establish a space force as the sixth branch of the armed forces."  "We are going to have the Air Force, and we are going to have the space force," Trump said. "Separate, but equal. It is going to be something so important." Trump then directed Gen. Joseph Dunford, the chairman of the Joint Chiefs, to "carry that assignment out."

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The Government Entrepreneur's Dilemma

The Government Entrepreneur's Dilemma | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Until there are meaningful rewards for transforming federal laboratory discoveries into useful products, tech transfer will remain little more than window dressing.  With the Chinese right on our heels, that's a luxury we can no longer afford.
Richard Platt's insight:

Got the news that EPA’s Water Technology Innovation Cluster was dead during the webcast of the final public meeting of the Administration’s ROI Initiative. About two hours into the program a speaker mentioned it during his three-minute statement. The two of us may have been the only ones listening that knew about this project.  Just a few years ago I’d called it a “model technology transfer program.”  Now it was gone, taking down several public-sector entrepreneurs with it.  The broadcast presented a series of thoughtful recommendations on how to improve the taxpayer’s return on investment in federally supported R&D.  But the news underscores a critical question. Despite all the laws, presidential statements, departmental orders, speeches, etc. is the commercialization of technology really a priority in government agencies?  Many times, the answer is “No, that’s not our mission.” And those who believe otherwise often pay a price.

So, if you’re a taxpayer or think protecting water is a demonstrable public good, take a second to mourn the passing of a program with a shoestring budget that punched well above its weight. It died because it was viewed as more of a threat than a benefit to its agency.  When we think of government/industry collaborations, the Environmental Protection Agency probably doesn’t come to mind.  Known chiefly for its regulatory responsibilities and industry oversight, it’s not what many companies view as an ally.  But there’s another side that’s largely hidden from view.  Despite its small budget, EPA’s Office of Research and Development performs cutting edge basic and applied R&D in its national centers and laboratories.  That’s particularly true when it comes to clean water.  Much of this expertise resides at the Andrew W. Breidenback Environmental Research Center in Cincinnati, Ohio.

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Google's Masterplan for Healthcare #digitalhealth

Google's Masterplan for Healthcare #digitalhealth | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it

The search engine’s parent company, Alphabet takes its move into medicine seriously. We looked at it thoroughly what Google in healthcare looks like.


Via Lionel Reichardt / le Pharmageek
Richard Platt's insight:
The Alphabet of investment

Larry Page says on the opening page of Alphabet that they do not intend to become a conventional company. When you look at their actions in healthcare, that’s definitely true. No other company in the Silicon Valley is investing so heavily in healthcare-related companies as Alphabet’s venture arm, GV (formerly known as Google Ventures) does.

Since it raised its first fund in 2009, it has backed nearly 60 health-related enterprises. Their portfolio is very diverse ranging from genetics to telemedicine. GV invested in 23andme, the most well-known direct-to-consumer genetic testing company with one of the biggest DNA databases in the world. In addition, Google has stakes in Oscar Health, the New York-based venture disrupting health insurance; Doctor on Demand, a telehealth company helping people talking to physicians from afar; Flatiron Health, a company building a data platform dedicated to oncology or Impossible Foods developing plant-based meats and cheeses.

Moreover, CNBC says that five of GV’s healthcare bets have gone public in the last year, and 23andme plans to do that before the end of the year. It seems like a lot of well-placed investment money for Alphabet. However, that’s only one side of the story.

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First Principles First

First Principles First | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Darrell Mann “As to methods there may be a million and then some, but principles are few. The man who grasps principles can successfully select his own
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S-Curves – the reason we’re in the business we’re in is because of the universality of the s-curve. All systems hit limits; when they hit those limits, the only way to improve the system is to change the system. Which means jumping to a new s-curve. The ‘limit’ is a contradiction. The contradiction comes from a ‘vicious cycle’. The shape of the s-curve is driven by the dynamics of a minimum of two cycles: a ‘virtuous cycle’ to drive the upward trajectory, and the ‘vicious’ one that prevents the system from improving forever:

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Smart TV FAQ - The Pros and Cons of Smart Televisions

Smart TV FAQ - The Pros and Cons of Smart Televisions | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
A smart TV makes it easy to stream movies and shows, and newer models offer voice control and smart home integration. But there are some risks, too.
Richard Platt's insight:

A growing number of models now include voice recognition tools, like Alexa, for switching channels and searching for programs. Premium models are also gaining voice-drive search, which can find shows and movies across streaming apps and live programming from cable or satellite.  Voice control and the integration of smart home features, such as Samsung's SmartThings hub on its sets, mean that many TVs are compatible with other connected devices in the home, including lights, door locks and other sensors.

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Despite AI ethical concerns, IoT and smart sensor investments on rise new report finds

Despite AI ethical concerns, IoT and smart sensor investments on rise new report finds | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Most healthcare execs are planning to buy AI and IoT technology, but they'll need other capabilities and competencies to ensure they're safely deployed.

Via Florian Morandeau
Richard Platt's insight:

91% of healthcare execs said blockchain and smart contracts will be critical tools over the next three years.

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Florian Morandeau's curator insight, June 14, 8:00 AM

91% of healthcare execs said blockchain and smart contracts will be critical tools over the next three years.

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Flying Cars and the Future of Transportation

Flying Cars and the Future of Transportation | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it

Flying Cars and the Future of TransportationThe flying car has long been part of science fiction. It may be closer to science fact than ever before.

Via TechinBiz
Richard Platt's insight:

The flying car has long been part of science fiction. It may be closer to science fact than ever before.

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Artificial intelligence and IoT to be biggest drivers of Business transformation

Artificial intelligence and IoT to be biggest drivers of Business transformation | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Artificial intelligence and Internet of Things to be biggest drivers of Business transformation
U.S. tech industry leaders in KPMG's tech innovation survey cited AI and IoT as the top two technologies expected to drive business transformation over the next three years, and KPMG Global and U.S. Tech

Via TechinBiz
Richard Platt's insight:

U.S. tech industry leaders in KPMG’s tech innovation survey cited AI and IoT as the top two technologies expected to drive business transformation over the next three years, and KPMG Global and U.S. Tech Sector Leader Tim Zanni says tech-driven change will continue to challenge business leaders.

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AI and The Future of Working

AI and The Future of Working | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
AI and The Future of WorkingHow will AI transform our world as the technology develops?

Via TechinBiz
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How will AI transform our world as the technology develops?

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How artificial intelligence is shaping the classroom in China 

How artificial intelligence is shaping the classroom in China  | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
It’s not every day that we get to look into the future of learning. But with recent artificial intelligence development in China’s classrooms, we’re taking a sneak peek of what it will look like.

Via Nik Peachey
Richard Platt's insight:

WHY IS CHINA LEADING AI APPLIED IN EDUCATION?

Before diving into how China is changing the classroom, it’s worth exploring why they are doing it.

China wants to adopt AI in education as part of a larger government initiative. To put it simply, China wants to help “set the global standard” of AI, and is working nonstop to become the global leader in the technology. To do this, China is adopting AI in every sector, Education included, as well as investing heavily in the technology.

For example, just this month the city of Tianjin announced that it would devote $16 billion USD to support AI initiatives. The ultimate goal is to bring in corporate investments to help the city prosper from AI and boost the city’s technological infrastructure.

Tianjin is also setting up a separate $1.5 billion USD fund to promote intelligent manufacturing—something that would dramatically improve the lives of the city’s 15.5 million residents.

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Nik Peachey's curator insight, June 20, 1:01 AM

This raises a lot of ethical questions for me.

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At this rodeo, robots enter downed planes and explore fake radioactive disasters

At this rodeo, robots enter downed planes and explore fake radioactive disasters | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
In the New Mexico desert, military and civilian bomb squads faced off at the 12th annual Robot Rodeo, which is a week of intense training organized by Sandia National Laboratories. To test their skills, bomb squads steered their bots to enter downed planes, explore faux-radioactive disaster sites, and climb flights of stairs.
Richard Platt's insight:

Last week in the New Mexico desert, military and civilian bomb squads faced off at the 12th annual Robot Rodeo, which is a week of intense training organized by Sandia National Laboratories. To test their skills, bomb squads steered their bots to enter downed planes, explore faux-radioactive disaster sites, and climb flights of stairs.  “Everybody else is running away from the bomb, and these guys are going in,” says Jake Deuel, robotics manager at Sandia and coordinator of the rodeo. His goal is for the event to help bomb squads tackle real-world situations and learn what their robots can and cannot do. “We train these guys to come home safe,” he says.  Some of the crafted scenarios are designed to test the robot operators’ skills and problem-solving abilities. One exercise, for example, was based on the 1984 movie Red Dawn, where teenagers fight off invading forces in World War III. The competing robots had to go into a downed Phantom F-4 fighter jet to “retrieve the black box and some of the fancy electronics so that we can figure out what the enemy is doing,” Deuel says. Another exercise required bomb squads to work together to find the sources of an underground radiation leak and contain them.

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High-speed rail between Tampa and Orlando could soon be a Reality

High-speed rail between Tampa and Orlando could soon be a Reality | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
On Friday, Governor Rick Scott announced that the Florida Department of Transportation is taking bids to fund a new high-speed train that would connect Tampa and Orlando.
Richard Platt's insight:

On Friday, Governor Rick Scott announced that the Florida Department of Transportation is taking bids to fund a new high-speed train that would connect Tampa and Orlando.

Governor Scott stated that FDOT and the Central Florida Expressway Authority received a private proposal to lease property owned by the state and CFX to build the track along Interstate 4. Based on the unsolicited proposal, FDOT is allowing other private investors to also apply to fund the high-speed rail.

Brightline, the high-speed rail linking Miami and West Palm Beach, said it has put in a bid to build track along I-4.

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US Space Force Uniform Ideas

US Space Force Uniform Ideas | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
We've created a handy cheat sheet for the Pentagon officials tasked with coming up with the Space Force's basic military branding tool, the uniform.
Richard Platt's insight:

President Trump's Space Force went from tossed-off idea to hard and fast United States policy this morning and everyone at the Pentagon is scrambling to figure out how to crank up the sixth branch of the United States Armed Forces.  Everyone knows that uniforms are a key tool for each branch's recruiting strategy. You never get a second chance to make a first impression, and rocket ships aside, the United States Space Force is going to need a badass uniform to convince the kids to sign up.   That's why we created a handy cheat sheet for the Pentagon officials tasked with coming up with these basic branding tools. Fortunately, Hollywood has been predicting this day for over 100 years and they've designed thousands of outer space uniforms for sci-fi movies and TV shows. Here are some critical reference points for outfitting America's next generation of heroes. Star Trek, Battle Star Galactica and Star Wars, what no Buck Rogers?

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The researcher behind AI's biggest breakthrough has moved on from Google

The researcher behind AI's biggest breakthrough has moved on from Google | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Alex Krizhevsky didn't get into the AI business to change the course of history. Krizhevsky, born in Ukraine but raised in Canada, was just looking to delay getting a coding job when he reached out to Geoff Hinton about doing a computer-science PhD program in AI at the University of Toronto. The fateful momen
Richard Platt's insight:

Alex Krizhevsky didn’t get into the AI business to change the course of history.  Born in Ukraine but raised in Canada, was just looking to delay getting a coding job when he reached out to Geoff Hinton about doing a computer-science PhD program in AI at the University of Toronto. The fateful moment was when, as a graduate student, Krizhevsky and a fellow student named Ilya Sutskever, decided to enter the ImageNet competition, a test for AI consisting of a huge database of online images.

The competition, open to anyone in the world, was to evaluate algorithms designed for large-scale object detection and image classification. The point wasn’t just to crown a winner, but to test a hypothesis: with the right algorithm, the massive amount data in the ImageNet database could be the key to unlocking AI’s potential. The two grad students, working with Hinton as an advisor, decided to enter the 2012 competition using a fringe idea: an artificial neural network designed by Krizhevsky. The approach dominated the contest, beating every other research lab by a huge 10.8% margin. They beat every other research lab by a huge 10.8% margin. Thus, the current AI boom was born. Google hired the three researchers to seed a new, major projects using neural nets; the technology’s decision-making prowess soon put the words “deep learning” on the lips of every founder and Silicon Valley executive. Other tech companies like Facebook, Amazon, and Microsoft started positioning their businesses around the tech.  Now Krizhevsky, following a four-and-a-half year stint at Google, is riding the wave he helped generate, by joining deep-learning startup Dessa as its technical adviser. Dessa, previously called Deeplearni.ng, works with companies to overhaul their businesses with AI. For example, it worked with Scotiabank to develop a deep-learning system that identifies the signs of potentially-delinquent customers faster.

A highly non-obvious solution

Back in his grad school years, Krizhevsky was reading papers on an earlier algorithm invented by his advisor, Hinton, called the “restricted Boltzmann machine.” He had seen graphics processing units (GPUs) used with restricted Boltzmann machines, instead of central process units (CPU). He thought that if could use those GPUs on other kinds of neural networks with more layers (or, “deep neural networks”) he could ratchet up processing speeds of deep neural networks and create a better algorithm.The result was a neural network design to quickly beat other state-of-the-art benchmarks in algorithm accuracy.  Shortly after that discovery, in 2011, Sutskever, another of Hinton’s grad students, learned about the ImageNet dataset. It was more than a million images, specifically crafted for the kinds of computer-vision algorithms that the Toronto team were trying to tackle. “I realized that his code was capable of solving ImageNet,” says Sutskever. “A highly non-obvious realization at the time.”  Krizhevsky then used the enhanced capabilities of his GPU-sped code to train the neural network on the dataset. The higher calculation speeds allowed the network to process those millions of images in five or six days, rather than the weeks or even months it would have taken previously. All the extra data that could be processed enabled the neural network to have unprecedented sensitivity in telling the differences between objects in an image.  “Unlike many other researchers, he’s an engineer at heart.” Hinton was originally resistant to the idea, since the neural network still needed to be told which objects were in which images rather than learning the labels itself, but still contributed to the project in an advisory role. It took six months just to break even with what were then the image-classification benchmarks for ImageNet, and then another six to achieve the results the team submitted.  “[Krizhevsky] has an extremely deep understanding of [machine learning], and unlike many other researchers, he’s an engineer at heart,” says Sutskever, who is now director of research at OpenAI. “He has the ability to keep at a problem until it’s solved.” Krizhevsky, who is soft-spoken and has never talked to the media before now, chuckles when recalling the weeks after the 2012 ImageNet results came out. “It became kind of surreal,” he says. “We started getting acquisition offers very quickly. Lots of emails.”

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MEMS: Who's Hot and Who's Hotter

Broadcom is on top at the MEMS game, but there's 17 other players to consider - we've collected them all in a mammot
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MEMS evolution
Looking back on the early days of MEMS, between the 1980s and ’90s, Mournier noted that MEMS was all about basic sensors detecting things like mechanical movements, pressures or shocks. “Those sensors weren’t very accurate,” he said.

Since the millenium, improved electronics and materials used in MEMS have made the sensors accurate enough to measure things, Mounier said. Rotation sensing and visible light management (DLP) became accessible to MEMS. By the mid-2000s, sound and IR wavelength were added to MEMS technologies, he noted.

In short, MEMS shifted from physical sensors to light management (such as micro mirrors), then to infra-red sensing (microbolometers). MEMS development has also been driven by sound with microphones.

The MEMS revolution has led to the first sensor that outperforms human senses. Today, MEMS and sensor developments are poised to “go far beyond human capabilities with sensing capabilities in ultra-sonic, hyperspectral, radio-frequency and others,” according to Mounier.

The hottest trend in MEMS is sensor fusion. By integrating multiple sensors into one package, MEMS can capture “global environment perception,” Mounier explained.

Let’s not forget, as sensors flock together, users expect the sensor package’s  software to combine sensory data and generate a certain level of intelligence. The next milestone is the Vulcan mind-meld of sensors and AI.

Although sensor fusion is unmistakably popular in automotive and smartphones, the industry remains divided as to where it should take place. Some companies are processing data much closer to the sensor. Others advocate late data fusion. Mounier acknowledged that the industry debate is far from over.

The fastest growing sensors?
Today, looking at sensor revenues by device category, CMOS imaging is tops at  $13.4 billion in 2017, followed by RF, radars and fingerprint sensors.

But if you ask about the fastest sensors in 2023, 3D is the odds-on favorite. Pointing out high demand for lidars, Mounier pegged the compound annual growth rate of 3D sensors at 40 percent.

MEMS winners and losers
MEMS products are diverse, driven by diverging market forces. A a result, winners and losers among MEMS vendors tend to change around.

Today, Broadcom’s MEMS business has shown the sharpest upward trajectory, thanks to RF MEMS.

Bosch, number two in the market, remains one of the most stable MEMS players. Mounier observed that because it hedges its bets by covering two contrasting MEMS market segments — consumers and automotive — Bosh has been “quite successful” in securing steady growth.

In contrast, STMicroelectronics’ MEMS business “faces challenges,” said Mounier, largely because Apple has been ST’s only big customer. Meanwhile, ST has been struggling to make waves in the automotive and industrial MEMS markets.

Knowles, one of the high-profile MEMS companies, is seeing flat revenue, largely because of intensifying competition in the MEMS microphone market.

Texas Instruments has been struggling largely because the micromirror is its only MEMS product. TI’s success hinges on lidars, said Mounier. If micromirrors can be successfully used in lidars, TI’s MEMS business will substantially change.

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Smart Cities - Infrastructure and Transport of the Future

Smart Cities - Infrastructure and Transport of the Future | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Smart Cities - Infrastructure and Transport of the Future

Imagine a silent and emission free city. Imagine a cleaner safer and more resource efficient world. This is our scenario for the future.

Via TechinBiz
Richard Platt's insight:

Imagine a silent and emission free city. Imagine a cleaner safer and more resource efficient world. This is our scenario for the future.

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What to Expect from IoT Platforms in 2018

What to Expect from IoT Platforms in 2018 | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
The intelligent digital mesh is evolving, with enterprises paying attention to the disruption and impact on business operations now and the horizon. In this article, we look at new trends for IoT platforms in 2018 and what to expect as the year develops.
Richard Platt's insight:

Recent European guidelines coming out recognize what 45% of data and analytics decision makers at US enterprises are saying about commercialize their data—they´re already doing it. In France, only 35% of companies are doing it, and 38% of German enterprises. Seeing the opportunity to level the playing field, the European Commission will issue guidelines this year to encourage the use of advanced data mining technology to boost the data economy with the advancement of IoT.  The IIoT is having unexpected benefits as manufacturing data is able to make better business strategies and decisions. IIoT Platforms Leaving IaaS Market:   A part of ongoing consolidation and offering built-in applications for customers is that the major IIoT platforms have transferred at least some of their industry-based or IoT-specific functions available through hyperscale Cloud providers like AWS, IBM, and Microsoft. As these massive Clouds extend their global reach, get clearance for compliance in a strict regulatory environment, and solidify their own IoT capabilities, this trend will continue to unfold. 

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Hulu Live vs. YouTube TV vs. Sling vs. Vue vs. DirecTV Now: Face-Off!

Hulu Live vs. YouTube TV vs. Sling vs. Vue vs. DirecTV Now: Face-Off! | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Hulu and YouTube's cord-cutter streaming services offer live broadcast and cable TV, but how do they compare to the competition?
Richard Platt's insight:

One limited to a couple of services, your options for streaming live TV have grown significantly over the last year, with the introduction of Hulu with Live TV and YouTube TV. Both include many, if not all, of the major broadcast networks, and come from extremely well known brands. If you're interested in cutting the cord with a cable replacement service, Hulu with Live TV and YouTube TV look pretty compelling.   But how does these new offerings compare to Sling TV, PlayStation Vue and DirecTV Now? We compared all of the services to help you decide how to spend your money, and found which service is best for NFL fans on a budget, and the perfect pick for those who can't do without CBS. Oh, and T-Mobile's jumping into this fray in 2018.

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WIRED Health: From AI doctors to 3D X-rays, the future of healthcare is already here

WIRED Health: From AI doctors to 3D X-rays, the future of healthcare is already here | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
How the future of medicine and healthcare will be changed by technology. All the highlights from WIRED Health 2018.

Via Art Jones
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Doctors will be helped by AI

The world needs high-quality healthcare just as it’s running out of doctors, warned Ada Health co-founder Claire Novorol – but AI can help. “In India and China, doctors have two minutes per patient,” she told delegates. “In Bangladesh it’s 43 seconds.” Her solution is Ada – a diagnostic AI built with GPs. It’s human plus machine, she explained. “Doctors are better at patient relationships, but AI has less bias and a better memory.”

Francis Crick Institute researcher Andrew Steele argued that AI’s lack of bias means it’s ideal to answer the dreaded question – how long have I got, doctor? Steele analysed the electronic health records of more than 100,000 patients, checking for diagnosis, prescription and results to arrive at strong prediction models. “Doctors can just press a button, the AI looks at the patient’s health record then spits out immediately – a ten per cent chance of dying in next five years, for instance,” he explained. The next step? Letting AI help prescribe treatment.

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Art Jones's curator insight, June 13, 1:09 PM

Doctors Helped By AI

 

Excerpt: “Doctors are better at patient relationships, but AI has less bias and a better memory.”

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Why Digital Transformation isn't a Choice Anymore

Why Digital Transformation isn't a Choice Anymore | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Digital transformation is more of a strategy than just a technology. So, prospering with or understanding digital transformation requires to have deep insights on the reasons that necessitate the raise of Digital transformation. Here we hit some key digital transformation secto
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Conclusion

Despite all efforts, enterprises are failing to achieve total digital transformation. This is because companies are forgetting the fact that digital transformation is more of a strategy than just a technology adoption. The enterprises need to have clearly defined objectives and scope while planning for transformation.

 

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Retail in 2020 - the 5 Technologies that will change the way you Shop

Retail in 2020 - the 5 Technologies that will change the way you Shop | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Retail 2020 | 5 Technologies that will change the way you Shop
Retail shopping will change more in the next 10 years than it has in the last 1000 years. These are 5 pieces of technology that will change the way you shop.

Via TechinBiz
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Retail shopping will change more in the next 10 years than it has in the last 1000 years. These are 5 pieces of technology that will change the way you shop.

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Martin Reeves: Your strategy needs a strategy | TED Talk

Martin Reeves: Your strategy needs a strategy | TED Talk | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Is it possible to look ahead without stumbling over what's in front of you? All too often companies spend precious time laying out long term strategic plans, only to discover that their maps are out of date in a month. Business strategy expert Martin Reeves offers a solution. He advocates transitioning from relying on a single "classical" approach to strategy and moving towards a more tailored approach to strategy and execution, selecting from 5 distinct patterns of success.
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Even though this TED Talk presentation was done in 2012, it is definitely still relevant today.  check it out. --> Is it possible to look ahead without stumbling over what's in front of you? All too often companies spend precious time laying out long term strategic plans, only to discover that their maps are out of date in a month. Business strategy expert Martin Reeves offers a solution. He advocates transitioning from relying on a single "classical" approach to strategy and moving towards a more tailored approach to strategy and execution, selecting from 5 distinct patterns of success.

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