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12 Big Data Predictions for 2014

12 Big Data Predictions for 2014 | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
It's been one of the big buzzwords of 2013, but what does 2014 have in store for big data? CIO.com looks at 12 ways the technology and the market will evolve in the coming year.
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Really good take on 2014 and beyond, we think anyway

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Solving the Engineers Dilemma: Product Development Challenges - Updated 03/09/2018

The Engineer’s Dilemma: Product Development Problems * - Complicated problems (meaning multiple interdependencies) to solve * - Complex problems (meaning layer…
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My apologies a previous version was posted and then Slideshare broke the "re-upload" function, which prevented a clean transition to this updated slide deck.  Again my sincerest regrets for any confusion or difficulty with the previous posting..

 

The Engineer’s Dilemma:  Product Development Challenges

  • Complicated problems (meaning multiple interdependencies) to solve
  • Complex problems (meaning layered) to solve
  • High development and production costs
  • Long development and production cycle times
  • Sometimes multiple re/development cycles
  • And be innovative, so that the company has a competitive design
  • Step and repeat the above

 

 This dilemma is shared across most engineering disciplines, Electrical, Mechanical, Electro-Mechanical, Process and Manufacturing Engineering, as well as others.  Read the presentation on how other companies have addressed these issues for their engineers and their companies for competitive advantage.

   

There' was a FREE, sponsored workshop by IEEE, offered in Portland Oregon on March 10th, 2018 at 1201 Lloyd Blvd., Suite 200 at 8AM if you want to go see if this approach is useful for you the engineer or your engineering teams.  But if you want something  presented like this for your team, group, discipline, industry let me know, contact me via LinkedIn.

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What to Expect from IoT Platforms in 2018

What to Expect from IoT Platforms in 2018 | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
The intelligent digital mesh is evolving, with enterprises paying attention to the disruption and impact on business operations now and the horizon. In this article, we look at new trends for IoT platforms in 2018 and what to expect as the year develops.
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Recent European guidelines coming out recognize what 45% of data and analytics decision makers at US enterprises are saying about commercialize their data—they´re already doing it. In France, only 35% of companies are doing it, and 38% of German enterprises. Seeing the opportunity to level the playing field, the European Commission will issue guidelines this year to encourage the use of advanced data mining technology to boost the data economy with the advancement of IoT.  The IIoT is having unexpected benefits as manufacturing data is able to make better business strategies and decisions. IIoT Platforms Leaving IaaS Market:   A part of ongoing consolidation and offering built-in applications for customers is that the major IIoT platforms have transferred at least some of their industry-based or IoT-specific functions available through hyperscale Cloud providers like AWS, IBM, and Microsoft. As these massive Clouds extend their global reach, get clearance for compliance in a strict regulatory environment, and solidify their own IoT capabilities, this trend will continue to unfold. 

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Hulu Live vs. YouTube TV vs. Sling vs. Vue vs. DirecTV Now: Face-Off!

Hulu Live vs. YouTube TV vs. Sling vs. Vue vs. DirecTV Now: Face-Off! | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Hulu and YouTube's cord-cutter streaming services offer live broadcast and cable TV, but how do they compare to the competition?
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One limited to a couple of services, your options for streaming live TV have grown significantly over the last year, with the introduction of Hulu with Live TV and YouTube TV. Both include many, if not all, of the major broadcast networks, and come from extremely well known brands. If you're interested in cutting the cord with a cable replacement service, Hulu with Live TV and YouTube TV look pretty compelling.   But how does these new offerings compare to Sling TV, PlayStation Vue and DirecTV Now? We compared all of the services to help you decide how to spend your money, and found which service is best for NFL fans on a budget, and the perfect pick for those who can't do without CBS. Oh, and T-Mobile's jumping into this fray in 2018.

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WIRED Health: From AI doctors to 3D X-rays, the future of healthcare is already here

WIRED Health: From AI doctors to 3D X-rays, the future of healthcare is already here | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
How the future of medicine and healthcare will be changed by technology. All the highlights from WIRED Health 2018.

Via Art Jones
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Doctors will be helped by AI

The world needs high-quality healthcare just as it’s running out of doctors, warned Ada Health co-founder Claire Novorol – but AI can help. “In India and China, doctors have two minutes per patient,” she told delegates. “In Bangladesh it’s 43 seconds.” Her solution is Ada – a diagnostic AI built with GPs. It’s human plus machine, she explained. “Doctors are better at patient relationships, but AI has less bias and a better memory.”

Francis Crick Institute researcher Andrew Steele argued that AI’s lack of bias means it’s ideal to answer the dreaded question – how long have I got, doctor? Steele analysed the electronic health records of more than 100,000 patients, checking for diagnosis, prescription and results to arrive at strong prediction models. “Doctors can just press a button, the AI looks at the patient’s health record then spits out immediately – a ten per cent chance of dying in next five years, for instance,” he explained. The next step? Letting AI help prescribe treatment.

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Art Jones's curator insight, June 13, 1:09 PM

Doctors Helped By AI

 

Excerpt: “Doctors are better at patient relationships, but AI has less bias and a better memory.”

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Why Digital Transformation isn't a Choice Anymore

Why Digital Transformation isn't a Choice Anymore | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Digital transformation is more of a strategy than just a technology. So, prospering with or understanding digital transformation requires to have deep insights on the reasons that necessitate the raise of Digital transformation. Here we hit some key digital transformation secto
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Conclusion

Despite all efforts, enterprises are failing to achieve total digital transformation. This is because companies are forgetting the fact that digital transformation is more of a strategy than just a technology adoption. The enterprises need to have clearly defined objectives and scope while planning for transformation.

 

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Retail in 2020 - the 5 Technologies that will change the way you Shop

Retail in 2020 - the 5 Technologies that will change the way you Shop | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Retail 2020 | 5 Technologies that will change the way you Shop
Retail shopping will change more in the next 10 years than it has in the last 1000 years. These are 5 pieces of technology that will change the way you shop.

Via TechinBiz
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Retail shopping will change more in the next 10 years than it has in the last 1000 years. These are 5 pieces of technology that will change the way you shop.

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Martin Reeves: Your strategy needs a strategy | TED Talk

Martin Reeves: Your strategy needs a strategy | TED Talk | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Is it possible to look ahead without stumbling over what's in front of you? All too often companies spend precious time laying out long term strategic plans, only to discover that their maps are out of date in a month. Business strategy expert Martin Reeves offers a solution. He advocates transitioning from relying on a single "classical" approach to strategy and moving towards a more tailored approach to strategy and execution, selecting from 5 distinct patterns of success.
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Even though this TED Talk presentation was done in 2012, it is definitely still relevant today.  check it out. --> Is it possible to look ahead without stumbling over what's in front of you? All too often companies spend precious time laying out long term strategic plans, only to discover that their maps are out of date in a month. Business strategy expert Martin Reeves offers a solution. He advocates transitioning from relying on a single "classical" approach to strategy and moving towards a more tailored approach to strategy and execution, selecting from 5 distinct patterns of success.

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What Is the Navy’s Secret 'Sea Dragon' Weapon?

What Is the Navy’s Secret 'Sea Dragon' Weapon? | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Made public thanks to Chinese hackers, the weapon is supposedly a new offensive missile.
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The U.S. Navy and an unknown defense contractor are working on a new missile the service says will give its submarines a new, “disruptive offensive capability” to take on enemy ships. The previously unknown weapon, known as Sea Dragon, supposedly combines existing an U.S. Navy platform with an existing capability, is likely a new version of a versatile air defense missile capable of pinch hitting as an anti-ship missile.  The Washington Post broke the story over the weekend that Chinese hackers had compromised the computers of a Navy contractor and stolen 614 gigabytes of data. The stolen data pertained to the Navy’s Naval Undersea Warfare Center, which conducts research and development on submarine systems. According to the Post, the stolen data includes, “signals and sensor data, submarine radio room information relating to cryptographic systems, and the Navy submarine development unit’s electronic warfare library.”

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Soldier Steals Armored Vehicle, Takes Joyride Through City

Soldier Steals Armored Vehicle, Takes Joyride Through City | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
The National Guard lieutenant was charged with driving under the influence of drugs, among many other things.
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So I am an ex-NCO from the US Army, and if I would have stayed in, I would have most likely have become a Warrant Officer in my field (like my hero; Chief Warrant Officer Richard L. Goins, this guy was a Rockstar of a Technical Leader).  In fact one of the things you could say was, and still is, to this day very true about life in the US Army, that when a Chief Warrant Officer said "watch this", you could be guaranteed a surprising event was in store, usually at the expense of some jack-ass Lt, or NCO who had his/her head up their backside.  

 

Anyway to add a little light-hearted fun to to your day, here is a story for your edification from the folks at Popular Mechanics, on why Lt's need to be smacked around every so often, for exceeding their brief.

 

An officer with the Virginia National Guard took police on a low-speed chase through the streets of Richmond, Virginia before being apprehended. The soldier, (in question) a first lieutenant with the Virginia National Guard, stole the armored command post before taking it on the interstate. He was later apprehended and booked on multiple charges.  Yesterday, June 6th 2018, First Lieutenant Joshua Phillip Yabut drove the M1068 armored command post vehicle off the grounds of Fort Pickett, an Army National Guard base in Blackstone, Virginia. According to the National Guard Yabut was the commander of Headquarters Company, 276th Engineer Battalion, Virginia National Guard.

Lieutenant Yabut drove the vehicle for nearly two hours, leaving Fort Pickett at 7:50 PM. He was taken into custody at 9:40 PM. Yabut drove the M1068 vehicle, which has tracks like a tank, on Interstates 85 and 95 to downtown Richmond where he was apprehended. Google Maps says the 60 mile trip typically takes just over an hour, but the M1068 isn’t capable of driving the speed limit, topping out at 40 miles an hour. Police vehicles followed the M1068 with lights flashing during the trip and no crashes or injuries were reported.

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Leading Chipmakers Eye EUV Lithography to Save Moore’s Law

Leading Chipmakers Eye EUV Lithography to Save Moore’s Law | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Intel, TSMC, and other chipmakers weigh extreme ultraviolet lithography, which may be ready by 2018
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But to keep the good times rolling, GlobalFoundries and other leading-edge chipmakers won’t be able to rely on the brilliant lithographic advances of the past. And so they’re contemplating another radical shift, one that could prove to be the most challenging yet.

For the entirety of its existence, semiconductor lithography has been done with electromagnetic radiation that was more or less recognizable as light. But for the change chipmakers are now weighing, the radiation is something else altogether. It’s called extreme ultraviolet (EUV) radiation, but don’t let that name fool you. Unlike the ultraviolet light used in today’s scanners, EUV can’t travel in air, and it can’t be focused by lenses or conventional mirrors.

And it’s also difficult to produce; the process begins by firing laser light at a rapid-fire stream of tiny molten tin droplets. The hope is that scanners built to use the resulting 13.5-nanometer light—a wavelength that is less than a tenth of what is used in today’s most state-of-the-art machines—will save chipmakers money by allowing them to print in a single step layers that would otherwise require multiple exposures.

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EUV Lithography Finally Ready for Chip Manufacturing

EUV Lithography Finally Ready for Chip Manufacturing | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
This long-awaited technology will extend the life of Moore’s Law
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“A fab is like an iceberg,” someone tells me. I can’t tell who because we’re all covered head to toe in clean-room garb. A tour of GlobalFoundriesFab 8 in Malta, N.Y., certainly reinforces that analogy: We’ve just come up from the “sub-fab,” the 10 meters of vertical space under the floor, where pipes and wires snake down from each semiconductor-manufacturing tool above to a set of automated chemical handlers, water analyzers, power conditioners, and—in the case of the unit I’ve come to see—kilowatt-class lasers.  The laser system takes up 15 to 20 square meters out of perhaps 80 square meters of the floor space required for a single machine. About halfway through a six-week assembly process of mind-bending complexity, the equipment making up the tip of the iceberg is a house-size agglomeration of shiny metal tubes, opaque chambers, and wiring. A half dozen bunny-suited technicians are moving around the behemoth, probing and connecting things in a carefully choreographed procedure.  The giant machine garnering all this attention is an extreme ultraviolet lithography tool. For more than a decade, the semiconductor-manufacturing industry has been alternately hoping EUV can save Moore’s Law and despairing that the technology will never arrive. But it’s finally here, and none too soon. Samsung was the first to claim it will be ready to produce chips for customers using EUV tools, saying that will happen in the second half of 2018. But its competitors GlobalFoundries, Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Co. (TSMC), and Intel are clearly on track to do the same within a quarter or two.

Intel won’t reveal anything about its road map, saying through a spokesperson, “We are committed to bringing EUV into production as soon as the technology is ready at an effective cost.” But VLSI Research analyst G. Dan Hutcheson points out that Intel has purchased more EUV tools than any other company.  GlobalFoundries, Samsung, and TSMC have been more forthcoming, and they seem to be following the same playbook. They are each introducing EUV in a second iteration of a 7-nanometer manufacturing process—the 7-nm node, as it’s called—which they will have run for as long as a year using the pre-EUV technology.  The thinking is clearly that two big changes would be too much to handle. Gary Patton, GlobalFoundries’ chief technology officer, describes the 7-nm process even without EUV as “an extreme sport.” If things work out and foundries can keep the tool running 80 percent of the time or more—which both GlobalFoundries and TSMC say they can do—EUV will actually make the 7-nm process simpler and cheaper. To understand why, though, you have to have a good grasp of how chipmaking is done now.  “Lithography is the heart of the fab,” says Thomas Caulfield, senior vice president and general manager of GlobalFoundries’ Fab 8. Silicon wafers have to make many stops along the way in their transformation from smooth blanks to iridescent platters jam-packed with 13-billion-transistor microprocessors. And many of those stops take place inside a photolithography tool. Today’s state-of-the-art process is called 193-nm immersion lithography. As the name implies, light with a wavelength of 193 nm shines through a patterned surface called a photomask. That process casts the pattern through water onto the silicon wafer, where it is fixed by a photosensitive chemical and then etched onto the wafer. The problem is that light can’t directly define features smaller than its own wavelength. And 193 nm is so much longer than the size of the features modern chips need. These days it takes a host of optical tricks and work-arounds to make up the difference. The most costly of these is the use of as many as three or four different photomasks to produce a single pattern on a chip. With today’s most complex processors, that means a wafer could need some 80 trips though the lithography tool.  EUV lithography’s reason for being is that it uses 13.5-nm light, which is much closer to the size of the final features to be printed. With it, manufacturers can turn three or four lithography steps into one. For its 7-nm EUV process, GlobalFoundries will replace 15 steps with just 5. John Lin, TSMC’s director of litho equipment and mask technology, says his company plans a similar reduction.  While that will make the work at 7 nm faster and cheaper, it’s the nodes beyond where EUV will be absolutely crucial. “If you didn’t use EUV for 5 nm, it’d be more than 100 [lithographic steps],” says Patton. “That’d be insane.” Patton makes it sound as though EUV lithography arrived just in time, and in a way it has. But it has been a decades-long journey with many moments when one expert or another declared it dead. Its arrival in production now still seems a bit unbelievable to some observers. According to VLSI’s Hutcheson, the long delay shouldn’t be that surprising. “Core technology takes a lot longer than anyone would expect,” he says. Despite using different light sources along the way, lithography hasn’t really had a change in technology this fundamental since the 1980s, he argues.

Throughout most of EUV’s history, the main problem has been the light source, and considering its complexity, that’s not surprising. In a vacuum chamber at one end of the machine, microscopic droplets of molten tin are fired in a stream as two laser blasts strike each of them sequentially. The first one hits the droplets so precisely that they flatten into misty discs. The second blasts them with so much power that they become little balls of plasma shining with EUV light.

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Best CPU's for Gaming for 2018 - AMD beats out Intel

Best CPU's for Gaming for 2018 - AMD beats out Intel | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
What's the best CPU for gaming? It’s a vital part of building your own gaming PC. So we've tested all the top AMD and Intel processors to help you make the right decision.
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What's the best CPU for gaming? It’s a vital part of building your own gaming PC. So we've tested all the top AMD and Intel processors to help you make the right decision.  Gaming is still heavily reliant on single-threaded CPU power in terms of raw performance, but you can't just get a couple of speedy cores and hope they'll keep your graphics card fully fed. Despite the dominance of quad-core CPUs - or above - in today’s gaming rigs the difficulty of coding for multi-core processors has meant we’re still not seeing many modern game engines taking full advantage of the powerful CPUs many of us have in our machines.

But that could be set to change with an increased number of dedicated DirectX 12 (and to a similar extent, Vulkan) games offering a more streamlined method for delivering all that processing power into the hands of gamers.  AMD have usurped the top spot for the best gaming CPU with their Ryzen 2 processors, but they still have fierce competition from Intel's Coffee Lake chips. Take a look below to find the processor that fits you best. The best CPUs for gaming are:

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Alexa, Siri and Google Assistant can be hacked with voice commands

Alexa, Siri and Google Assistant can be hacked with voice commands | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Hacks are often caused by our own stupidity, but you can blame tech companies for a new vulnerability. Researchers from China's Zheijiang University foun

Via Sara Mautino
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Hacks are often caused by our own stupidity, but you can blame tech companies for a new vulnerability.

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First Principles First

First Principles First | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Darrell Mann “As to methods there may be a million and then some, but principles are few. The man who grasps principles can successfully select his own
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S-Curves – the reason we’re in the business we’re in is because of the universality of the s-curve. All systems hit limits; when they hit those limits, the only way to improve the system is to change the system. Which means jumping to a new s-curve. The ‘limit’ is a contradiction. The contradiction comes from a ‘vicious cycle’. The shape of the s-curve is driven by the dynamics of a minimum of two cycles: a ‘virtuous cycle’ to drive the upward trajectory, and the ‘vicious’ one that prevents the system from improving forever:

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Smart TV FAQ - The Pros and Cons of Smart Televisions

Smart TV FAQ - The Pros and Cons of Smart Televisions | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
A smart TV makes it easy to stream movies and shows, and newer models offer voice control and smart home integration. But there are some risks, too.
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A growing number of models now include voice recognition tools, like Alexa, for switching channels and searching for programs. Premium models are also gaining voice-drive search, which can find shows and movies across streaming apps and live programming from cable or satellite.  Voice control and the integration of smart home features, such as Samsung's SmartThings hub on its sets, mean that many TVs are compatible with other connected devices in the home, including lights, door locks and other sensors.

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Despite AI ethical concerns, IoT and smart sensor investments on rise new report finds

Despite AI ethical concerns, IoT and smart sensor investments on rise new report finds | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Most healthcare execs are planning to buy AI and IoT technology, but they'll need other capabilities and competencies to ensure they're safely deployed.

Via Florian Morandeau
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91% of healthcare execs said blockchain and smart contracts will be critical tools over the next three years.

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Florian Morandeau's curator insight, June 14, 8:00 AM

91% of healthcare execs said blockchain and smart contracts will be critical tools over the next three years.

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Flying Cars and the Future of Transportation

Flying Cars and the Future of Transportation | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it

Flying Cars and the Future of TransportationThe flying car has long been part of science fiction. It may be closer to science fact than ever before.

Via TechinBiz
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The flying car has long been part of science fiction. It may be closer to science fact than ever before.

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Artificial intelligence and IoT to be biggest drivers of Business transformation

Artificial intelligence and IoT to be biggest drivers of Business transformation | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Artificial intelligence and Internet of Things to be biggest drivers of Business transformation
U.S. tech industry leaders in KPMG's tech innovation survey cited AI and IoT as the top two technologies expected to drive business transformation over the next three years, and KPMG Global and U.S. Tech

Via TechinBiz
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U.S. tech industry leaders in KPMG’s tech innovation survey cited AI and IoT as the top two technologies expected to drive business transformation over the next three years, and KPMG Global and U.S. Tech Sector Leader Tim Zanni says tech-driven change will continue to challenge business leaders.

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AI and The Future of Working

AI and The Future of Working | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
AI and The Future of WorkingHow will AI transform our world as the technology develops?

Via TechinBiz
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How will AI transform our world as the technology develops?

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Air Force Grounds Entire B-1 Bomber Fleet Over Ejection Seat Concerns

Air Force Grounds Entire B-1 Bomber Fleet Over Ejection Seat Concerns | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
The U.S. Air Force has grounded its B-1B bomber fleet over safety concerns related to the Lancer's ejection seats.
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The U.S. Air Force has grounded its B-1B bomber fleet over safety concerns related to the Lancer's ejection seats.  The stand-down is a direct result of the emergency landing a B-1 made May 1 at Midland Airport in Texas, officials told Military.com.

"During the safety investigation process following an emergency landing of a B-1B in Midland, an issue with ejection seat components was discovered that necessitated the stand-down," Air Force Global Strike officials said Friday.  "As these issues are resolved, aircraft will return to flight," the command said in a statement, adding that a Safety Investigation Board is ongoing.

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The Army Figured Out the Best Time of Day to Drink Coffee for Max Effectiveness

The Army Figured Out the Best Time of Day to Drink Coffee for Max Effectiveness | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
The new study uses your sleep patterns to determine what time you should drink caffeine. 
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  • A new study says there is a right time to drink coffee so it's most effective.
  • U.S. Army researchers created a computer algorithm that studies sleep patterns to make recommendations about coffee intake.
  • The scientists hope to incorporate the algorithm in a pre-existing online tool that people can use for personal recommendations.

If you love caffeine, you may think there's never a wrong time for coffee, but a new study says there is a right time to get the most out of your daily cup.  Researchers from the United States Army developed an algorithm that makes personal recommendations for timing your caffeine consumption, so you can drink the least amount of coffee to achieve the maximum level of alertness, LiveScience reported.

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What is TRIZ - #Bring you Engineering Game to the Next Level

What is TRIZ - #Bring you Engineering Game to the Next Level | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Imagine the biggest study of human creativity ever conducted. Picture the systematic study of over two million of the world’s most successful patents, and
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If you don't know what TRIZ is, here is the official description of this fantastic methodology for every Engineer to "Bring you Engineering Game to the Next Level"

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Nanosheets: IBM’s Path to 5-Nanometer Transistors

Nanosheets: IBM’s Path to 5-Nanometer Transistors | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
IBM says their stacked nanosheet transistors will give circuit designers more flexibility
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Researchers at IBM believe the future of the transistor is in stacked nanosheets. After a decade of research, most recently in partnership with Samsung and Global Foundries, the company will describe 5-nanometer node test chips based on these transistors today at the Symposium on VLSI Technology and Circuits in Kyoto.  Today’s state-of-the-art transistor is the finFET, named for the fin-like ridges of current-carrying silicon that project from the chip’s surface. The silicon fins are surrounded on their three exposed sides by a structure called the gate. The gate switches the flow of current on, and prevents electrons from leaking out when the transistor is off. This design is expected to last from this year’s bleeding-edge process technology, the “10-nanometer” node, through the next node, 7 nanometers. But any smaller, and these transistors will become difficult to switch off: electrons will leak out, even with the three-sided gates.  So the semiconductor industry has been working on alternatives for the upcoming 5 nanometer node. One popular idea is to use lateral silicon nanowires that are completely surrounded by the gate, preventing electron leaks and saving power. This design is called “gate all around.” IBM’s new design is a variation on this. In their test chips, each transistor is made up of three stacked horizontal sheets of silicon, each only a few nanometers thick and completely surrounded by a gate.  Why a sheet instead of a wire? Huiming Bu, director of silicon integration and devices at IBM, says nanosheets can bring back one of the benefits of pre-finFET, planar designs. Designers used to be able to vary the width of a transistor to prioritize fast operations or energy efficiency. Varying the amount of silicon in a finFET transistor is not practicable because it would mean making some fins taller and other shorter. Fins must all be the same height due to manufacturing constraints, says Bu.  IBM’s nanosheets can range from 8 to 50 nanometers in width. “Wider gives you better performance but takes more power, smaller width relaxes performance but reduces power use,” says Bu. This will allow circuit designers to pick and choose what they need, whether they are making a power efficient mobile chip processor or designing a bank of SRAM memory. “We are bringing flexibility back to the designers,” he says.

The test chips have 30 billion transistors. The company has not benchmarked them against 7 nanometer designs, since those are not on the market. Compared to 10 nanometer chips, the new designs have a 40 percent performance enhancement at a given power; at matched performance, they can save 75 percent on power. Mukesh Khare, vice president of semiconductor technology and research at IBM, says that the company has spent years working on the process technology and materials for making stacked nanosheets.  The research chips were made using electron-beam lithography—a technology too expensive for mass production. But by the time 5-nanometer chips go into production extreme-ultraviolet lithography (EUV) will be available to reduce costs, according to Khare. He says that it takes the same number of EUV lithography masks—the patterns to be projected onto to the chip to form transistor components—to make a 5-nanometer nanosheet transistor as it does to make an equivalent finFET.

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Here's why Intel and AMD's 7nm CPU revolution is so important to the future of PCs

Here's why Intel and AMD's 7nm CPU revolution is so important to the future of PCs | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
Moore’s Law states that the complexity for minimum component costs will increase twofold every two years - and for nearly 50 years, Intel co-founder Gordon Moore has been consistently right. It’s
Richard Platt's insight:

Moore’s Law states that the complexity for minimum component costs will increase twofold every two years - and for nearly 50 years, Intel co-founder Gordon Moore has been consistently right. It’s not been looking so rosy for this aged theory in recent years, however, and Intel’s own 10nm process has become a long drawn-out affair. But there may be another technology, with its own troubled history, that could finally be close to saving the day for this ageing law: Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography, or EUV.

EUV is a revolutionary new production process that will allow 7nm CPU production to offer higher yields, with lower complexity, and potentially lower costs too. It's been the holy grail of chip manufacturers for years and is about to become a genuine reality.  It’s easy to dismiss the enormous and mind-boggling amount of work that goes into the best AMD and Intel processors. Those footnotes at the bottom of deep-dive product pages for your newly-purchased CPU or graphics card don’t often get due attention, but those little numbers - 14nm, 16nm, 22nm - represent the entire timeline for the age of computing. These fabrication process nodes have been chugging along in the minds of some very, very intelligent people for years, following the cadence of a law thought up in 1965: Moore’s law.

“Moore’s Law is fundamentally a law of economics,” Intel CEO, Brian Krzanich, says in a company strategy statement, “and Intel will confidently continue to harness its value. The law says that we can shrink transistor dimensions by roughly 50% at a roughly fixed cost, thus driving twice the transistors for the same cost (or the same number of transistors for half the cost).”  But that oversimplifies the rocky road it has taken to get your mass-produced PC componentry to the size it is today. Those billions of transistors, no matter the size - whether that’s 16nm for your Nvidia graphics card, 14nm for your Intel Coffee Lake CPU, or 12nm for your AMD Ryzen 2 chip - all had to be whittled away with 193nm UV light, in a process aptly named 193nm immersion lithography. Why 193nm? Well, with shorter wavelengths it gets a little tricky past that point to use light that isn’t absorbed by the atmosphere itself (which EUV has to get around), or that causes unexpected behaviour.

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Best graphics cards for 2018 - NVIDIA and AMD

Best graphics cards for 2018 - NVIDIA and AMD | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
What is the best gaming graphics card? The video card’s GPU is the heart of your gaming PC and here at PCGamesN we review and benchmark all the latest AMD and Nvidia graphics cards. So, should you g
Richard Platt's insight:

What is the best gaming graphics card? The video card’s GPU is the heart of your gaming PC and here at PCGamesN we review and benchmark all the latest AMD and Nvidia graphics cards. So, should you go for a cheap graphics card or go all in for 4K? We can help…Of course if you want the absolute pinnacle of graphical prowess you could drop a cool $3,000 on Nvidia’s Titan V, but now the GTX 1080 Ti is actually starting to come down to a more reasonable price, serious 4K performance is actually within reach. Radeon fans might have hoped the AMD Vega cards would have made more of an impact on the gaming world, but they’re still too expensive and too slow to really matter in the final reckoning.  But what should you buy right now? Well, with graphics card pricing starting to stabilise there is more choice than ever, though it’s still heavily weighted on the Nvidia side. 

But whether you’re chasing a good, cheap graphics card, a top-end 4K graphics card, or just simply the best overall card, we’ve got you covered.

The best graphics cards in 2018 are:

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These Glasses can help People with Disabilities use Technology without their Hands

These Glasses can help People with Disabilities use Technology without their Hands | Internet of Things - Technology focus | Scoop.it
These Glasses can help People with Disabilities use Technology without their Hands

Via TechinBiz
Richard Platt's insight:

Long overdue, Google should have been doing this with their Google Glass to begin with, solving problems for real people, instead they get a fiasco of having users become "Glassholes", good job Google

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Alex Mak's curator insight, June 8, 11:58 PM
Innovative Glasses