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Change or Die

Change or Die | Internet of Things - Company and Research Focus | Scoop.it

All leadership comes down to this: changing people's behavior. Why is that so hard? Science offers some surprising new answers...

Richard Platt's insight:

I once had one of my senior manager clients complain about the statement of "innovate or die" - the necessity of adapting because the firm's future is dependent on doing so.  Clearly he was resisting the idea of being able to make the necessary changes.  The only thing we would add is that change personally or at an organizational level is tough stuff to master, and most companies who attempt it fail miserably - we strongly suggest getting a change agent who's done it before to help you.    Please see our fellow curators comments below:


Matthew Delmarter's insight:

What if you were given this choice? How would you react?


This article offers some interesting comments on the science of behavioural change. Even when somebody's life is on the line, the numbers show that most of us will not change our habits.


So how to enforce change in somebody's behaviour? Or more importantly, change our own behaviour?


Here are some take-home comments I zoomed in on...


  • Instead of trying to motivate with the "fear of dying", inspire a new vision of the "joy of living" - convincing them they can feel better, not just live longer. That means enjoying the things that make daily life pleasurable, like making love or even taking long walks without the pain caused by their disease. "Joy is a more powerful motivator than fear".
      
  • Radical, sweeping, comprehensive changes are often easier for people than small, incremental ones.
      
  • Don't go it alone. Accept help and support - in fact, look for it. "If you look at people after coronary-artery bypass grafting two years later, 90% of them have not changed their lifestyle" - conversely when buttressed with weekly support groups with other patients, as well as attention from dieticians, psychologists, nurses, and instructors, over 77% of one group of patients did successfully change their lifestyle.
      
  • The cumulative weight of experience makes it harder to change.
      
  • People think they're leading an interesting life when they haven't learned anything in 20 or 30 years. What happens if you don't work at mental rejuvenation? People who live to 85 have a 50-50 chance of being senile. While the issue for heart patients is "change or die," the issue for everyone is "change or lose your mind."  


---


You can read the full article here:
http://www.fastcompany.com/52717/change-or-die

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Implementing an Internet of Things strategy - Information Age

Implementing an Internet of Things strategy - Information Age | Internet of Things - Company and Research Focus | Scoop.it
In the latest Innovation Spotlight, Information Age explores the practicalities of implementing an IoT strategy with World Wide Technology
Richard Platt's insight:

Many companies, while aware of the power of the IoT, do not implement an effective IoT strategy. Ben Boswell, area vice president, Europe, at World Wide Technology discusses with Information Age in the latest Innovation Spotlight episode, how to implement an effective IoT strategy in the enterprise.

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Rupert Murdoch Has His Pick of Suitors as He Ponders Fox's Fate

Rupert Murdoch Has His Pick of Suitors as He Ponders Fox's Fate | Internet of Things - Company and Research Focus | Scoop.it
After a lifetime building a media empire, Rupert Murdoch has to decide whether the changes roiling the industry are so daunting that he must tear his creation apart.
Richard Platt's insight:

After a lifetime building a media empire, Rupert Murdoch has to decide whether the changes roiling the industry are so daunting that he must tear his creation apart.  Murdoch’s 21st Century Fox Inc. owns a movie and TV studio, a U.S. broadcast network, a stake in Europe’s biggest satellite provider and cable channels such as FX and Star India -- and it’s still dwarfed by Walt Disney Co. and Comcast Corp. Viewers are abandoning traditional pay TV in droves, putting pressure on Big Media to get even bigger to survive.  That’s why Murdoch, 86, is entertaining the idea of selling some of his assets after decades of amassing TV and film properties. Disney, Comcast and Verizon Communications Inc. have expressed interest in Fox’s studio, the Sky Plc satellite stake and cable networks, according to people familiar with the matter. Fox would be left with properties including Fox News, the Fox broadcast network and perhaps sports channels, depending on the deal, the people said. Those assets are some of Fox’s most profitable, and Fox News, the most-watched cable news network, is especially close to Murdoch’s heart.

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Elon Musk: The Architect of Tomorrow

Elon Musk: The Architect of Tomorrow | Internet of Things - Company and Research Focus | Scoop.it
Inside Elon Musk's world-changing plans to inhabit outer space, revolutionize high-speed transportation, reinvent cars – and find love along the way.
Richard Platt's insight:

Painstakingly bulldozed, with no experience whatsoever, into two fields with ridiculously high barriers to entry – car manufacturing (Tesla) and rocketry (SpaceX) – and created the best products in those industries, as measured by just about any meaningful metric you can think of. In the process, he's managed to sell the world on his capability to achieve objectives so lofty that from the mouth of anyone else, they'd be called fantasies.

At least, most of the world. "I'm looking at the short losses," Musk says, transfixed by CNBC on his iPhone. He speaks to his kids without looking up. "Guys, check this out: Tesla has the highest short position in the entire stock market. A $9 billion short position."

His children lean over the phone, looking at a table full of numbers that I don't understand. So his 13-year-old, Griffin, explains it to me: "They're betting that the stock goes down, and they're getting money off that. But it went up high, so they lost an insane amount of money."

"They're jerks who want us to die," Musk elaborates. "They're constantly trying to make up false rumors and amplify any negative rumors. It's a really big incentive to lie and attack my integrity. It's really awful. It's..."

He trails off, as he often does when preoccupied by a thought. I try to help: "Unethical?"

"It's..." He shakes his head and struggles for the right word, then says softly, "Hurtful."

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Broadcom’s $130B Qualcomm bid highlights a ruthless chip industry

Broadcom’s $130B Qualcomm bid highlights a ruthless chip industry | Internet of Things - Company and Research Focus | Scoop.it
AT FIRST glance the chip business and the Serengeti appear to have little in common. But both are arenas where large predators hungrily stalk big game. On November 6th Broadcom announced its intention to buy its rival, Qualcomm, for around $130bn, including debt.
Richard Platt's insight:

Consolidation in semiconductors is only speeding up, both in memory chips and, as with this proposed transaction, in microprocessors. Between 2006 and 2016 deals worth a total of $556bn were struck as chipmakers sought to expand in a rapidly maturing industry. Previous sources of brisk growth, such as the spread of personal computers, tablets and smartphones, have dried up. Global sales of chips reached $344bn in 2016, but in the past five years they have flattened.

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Air Force faces serious 2,000-pilot shortage

Air Force faces serious 2,000-pilot shortage | Internet of Things - Company and Research Focus | Scoop.it
Top Air Force leaders and lawmakers are warning that a pilot shortage of 2,000 could cripple the service, leaving it unready to handle its responsibilities.
Richard Platt's insight:

As a result of this pilot short-fall I think drones are going to get additional attention, funding and expansion in support as well as in-theater operational use and roles -  just saying.  Read on  - The Air Force needs 20,000 pilots minimum to fly its wide range of aircraft, including fighter jets, helicopters, transport planes, support attack planes and cargo aircraft. At the start of the year, it said it had 18,500 pilots, well short of its minimum.  As of last week, the shortfall has jumped to a full 2,000 — meaning about 10 percent of its positions are unfilled. The majority are fighter pilots.  The problem is not that the Air Force is having trouble recruiting. It’s that airlines are offering bigger paychecks, and pilots are leaving when they are up for reenlistment.  The Air Force has tried to get its pilots to stay by offering contract extensions of just one or two years with $35,000 bonuses. That’s much less of a commitment than the five- and nine-year extensions typically offered.  Even with those numbers, it’s a deal for the Air Force.  “You do the math. It takes ten years to raise a fighter pilot, it takes you $10 million,” Air Force Chief of Staff Gen. David Goldfein said last week.

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PTC to Accelerate Customers’ Connected Service Strategy with Launch of ThingWorx Asset Advisor

PTC to Accelerate Customers’ Connected Service Strategy with Launch of ThingWorx Asset Advisor | Internet of Things - Company and Research Focus | Scoop.it
New Asset Advisor App for Service Enables Customers to Accelerate Time to Value. PTC today announced from PTC Forum Europe in Stuttgart, Germany, the launch of the ThingWorx® Asset Advisor app for service to accelerate its

Via IoT Business News
Richard Platt's insight:

ThingWorx Asset Advisor for service is a role-based app for service managers and technicians that is fast to deploy, scalable, flexible, and customizable. It provides visibility to connected assets with key role-intelligent information, offering insight into the operating condition of the asset, alerts on operating anomalies, and remote service for the connected assets.

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Hackers Beat iPhone X's Face ID Security In Just One Week

Hackers Beat iPhone X's Face ID Security In Just One Week | Internet of Things - Company and Research Focus | Scoop.it
Hackers claim to have beaten Apple's facial recognition security technology just one week after the iPhone X went on sale

Via TechinBiz
Richard Platt's insight:

Hackers claim to have beaten Apple's facial recognition security technology just one week after the iPhone X went on sale

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Salesforce shows how to bypass a key bottleneck in AI translation

Salesforce shows how to bypass a key bottleneck in AI translation | Internet of Things - Company and Research Focus | Scoop.it
Salesforce Research unveiled a new technique today that’s supposed to speed up machine translation using AI by doing away with one of the historical limitations of those systems. Instead of translating word by word, the system will now generate whole sentences at once.
Richard Platt's insight:

Salesforce Research unveiled a new technique today that’s supposed to speed up machine translation using AI by doing away with one of the historical limitations of those systems. Instead of translating word by word, the system will now generate whole sentences at once. The approach massively accelerates the process of machine translation compared to the current state of the art. Speeding up intelligent predictions is important, since users lose interest as systems take longer to generate results, and twiddling one’s thumbs while waiting for an AI translation can be a frustrating experience.  Richard Socher, the company’s chief scientist and one of the authors of the paper, announced the news at Dreamforce today in San Francisco. He said that efficient machine translation would be important for tasks like automatically localizing documentation.

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Google is buying part of HTC’s smartphone team for $1.1 billion

Google is buying part of HTC’s smartphone team for $1.1 billion | Internet of Things - Company and Research Focus | Scoop.it
Google is making a long-term investment in its own hardware.
Richard Platt's insight:

I almost missed this, as it actually took place while i was out of town on a trip to the other side of the country for a week.  Anyway Google is making another big buy into smartphone hardware — or at least the people responsible for creating it. The company has just confirmed that it plans to acquire part of HTC’s mobile division team for $1.1 billion. “These future fellow Googlers are amazing folks we’ve already been working with closely on the Pixel smartphone line, and we're excited to see what we can do together as one team,” Rick Osterloh, Google’s hardware boss, wrote in a blog post. “The deal also includes a non-exclusive license for HTC intellectual property.”  Peter Shen, HTC’s chief financial officer, said that HTC would still employ more than 2,000 research and design staffers after the deal is done, down from around 4,000, according to The New York Times. That makes today’s announcement more of an acqui-hire of talent than a traditional acquisition of resources.  HTC will continue onward with its own smartphone business even after sending a good portion of its talent and operations over to Google. HTC CEO Cher Wang said that this agreement will “ensure continued innovation within our HTC smartphone and Vive virtual reality business.” In fact, HTC’s press release reveals that the company is already “actively preparing” for its next flagship smartphone. A major announcement was all but assured Wednesday, when HTC announced it would briefly halt trading on the Taiwan stock exchange ahead of “material information” to come on Thursday (local time).  This is the second time that Google has made a big purchase involving a smartphone manufacturer. Six years ago, Google announced a $12.5 billion buyout of Motorola Mobility. “Together, we will create amazing user experiences that supercharge the entire Android ecosystem for the benefit of consumers, partners and developers everywhere,” said then-Google CEO Larry Page.

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The Nintendo Switch deserves a portable projector dock

The Nintendo Switch deserves a portable projector dock | Internet of Things - Company and Research Focus | Scoop.it
Assuming it actually ships
Richard Platt's insight:

In the original Switch marketing campaign, Nintendo revealed a bold vision of the device as a truly portable console, with people bringing the Switch to friends’ houses or bars and enjoying Nintendo games together.  OJO is a Switch accessory from YesOJO Studios that builds on that idea, combining a portable projector, speaker, and a backup battery into a mobile dock for your Switch, viaTechCrunch. It’s the kind of thing that seems almost blindingly obviously once you see it: the Switch’s portability is good and the Switch is great for multiplayer on the go, so why not add a projector to make that possible on a larger screen anywhere? The company claims the dock can project a display between 30 to 120 inches at 200 lumens, while the power bank offers an extra 20, 400 mAh battery to both power the projector and extend the life of your Switch.

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Apple and Samsung head for yet another patent damages trial

Apple and Samsung head for yet another patent damages trial | Internet of Things - Company and Research Focus | Scoop.it
Judge Lucy Koh also details how to determine what "article of manufacture" actually did the infringing.

Via Kenneth Carnesi,JD
Richard Platt's insight:

The two tech giants will head back to district court for yet another trial looking into design patent infringement. Judge Lucy Koh, in an order signed Sunday, has told the companies to meet again in a courtroom to determine how much Samsung owes Apple for infringing three patents.   The decision follows a Supreme Court ruling a year ago that said damages could be determined differently than they typically had been in the past.  Damages for design patent infringement, the justices said, can be based only on the part of the device that infringed the patents, not necessarily on the entire product.  "The Court finds that the jury instructions given at trial did not accurately reflect the law and that the instructions prejudiced Samsung by precluding the jury from considering whether the relevant article of manufacture ... was something other than the entire phone," Koh wrote in the order, handing Samsung a victory in its quest for a retrial.   Samsung said in a statement that it welcomes the new trial. "This is a historic opportunity to determine how the US Supreme Court's guidance on design patent damages will be implemented in our case and future cases," the company said.    Apple didn't immediately respond to a request for comment.   The companies have been battling over patents since 2012, and a question about how much money could be owed for infringing design patents made it all the way to the Supreme Court in late 2016. In December, the highest court in the land, in a unanimous opinion, issued its ruling on the scope of the infringing "article of manufacture."  That ruling reshapes the value of designs and how much one company may have to pay for copying the look of a competitor's product. Before that time, the law said an award could be collected on the entire profits of an infringing device. In this case, that's the $399 million Samsung paid Apple last last year.   But the Supreme Court didn't give guidance on how damages should be decided, and in February, an appeals court punted the case back to district court for the Northern District of California.  Apple had asked for the appeals court to uphold the earlier damages ruling because Samsung never showed an "article of manufacture" to be anything other than an entire phone. Samsung, meanwhile, wanted the case sent back to district court for a new damages trial.    Koh, in her order on Sunday, detailed how to define an "article of manufacture" at question in a case. Previously, Apple had argued that the article of manufacture was an entire phone. Koh said the test for determining what item has been infringed will be based on four factors:

  • "The scope of the design claimed in the plaintiff's patent, including the drawing and written description;
  • The relative prominence of the design within the product as a whole;  
  • Whether the design is conceptually distinct from the product as a whole; and 
  • The physical relationship between the patented design and the rest of the product, including whether the design pertains to a component that a user or seller can physically separate from the product as a whole, and whether the design is embodied in a component that is manufactured separately from the rest of the product, or if the component can be sold separately."
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British Airways Using Remote-controlled, Electric Tugs At Heathrow Airport

British Airways Using Remote-controlled, Electric Tugs At Heathrow Airport | Internet of Things - Company and Research Focus | Scoop.it
Roll-out across entire narrowbody network planned.
Richard Platt's insight:

British Airways (BA), citing the emissions benefits of the new, battery-powered machines, has deployed five remote-controlled tugs at London Heathrow's Terminal 5 (T5), replacing manned, diesel-powered tugs.  Working with the airport, BA put the Mototok push-back devices in service last month. Configured to service Airbus narrowbodies, the tugs are operated via a remote control.  The devices feature fully programmable speeds, braking curves, initial torques and over-steering protection.  Mototok says one of its tugs can manage two jetbridges. A fully charged tug can handle about 30 push-backs, and re-charging takes about 3 hours.   Heathrow plans to install charging stations at each of T5's 25 gates.  While other airlines and aircraft handlers use the Mototok, BA says its deployment is the first across multiple stands.   BA "plans to roll out the Mototok across its short-haul operation by the end of the year, and is exploring the possibility of introducing the technology to push back long-haul aircraft in the future," the carrier says.

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Safran Mulls Silvercrest Fix Options

Safran Mulls Silvercrest Fix Options | Internet of Things - Company and Research Focus | Scoop.it
Following Dassault’s surprise disclosure of another engine-related delay to the Falcon 5X here at NBAA, Safran says it has identified the problems with the Silvercrest and is poised to discuss a range of potential fixes with the airframe manufacturer.
Richard Platt's insight:

Following Dassault’s surprise disclosure of another engine-related delay to the Falcon 5X here at NBAA, Safran says it has identified the problems with the Silvercrest and is poised to discuss a range of potential fixes with the airframe manufacturer.  Despite Dassault hinting that the latest problems may force it to consider an alternative engine, Safran says it is striving to minimize further delays and insists the baseline architecture of the Silvercrest is sound. However, according to Safran commercial engines VP Cedric Goubet, the length of the delay will depend on which particular set of fixes is selected, and he adds that the revised schedule will be known well before the end of the year.  “The Silvercrest is an all-new engine, but with proven technologies, and is aimed at reaching performance levels that are unrivaled for this market segment. However, it’s been a challenge – and, truth be told, more challenging than we thought initially,” says Goubet. The unexpected problems cropped up in September during flight tests of the latest configuration of the Silvercrest incorporating improvements destined for the service-entry standard on the -5X.  “We had made a lot of progress, and solutions to most of our previous difficulties were validated and verified during the tests of this new configuration. But then this issue appeared, and clearly it was very disappointing,” 

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Samsung Leaks Reveal Radical New Galaxy Smartphone

Samsung Leaks Reveal Radical New Galaxy Smartphone | Internet of Things - Company and Research Focus | Scoop.it
Samsung has plans to radically redesign its new Galax
Richard Platt's insight:

In a flurry of new posts, reliable yet mysterious leaker Ice Universe has revealed the Galaxy S9 will not only be joined by a Galaxy S9 Plus but also a 5-inch Galaxy S9 ‘mini’. This smaller model is said to share all the cutting edge specs of the bigger models (unlike previous Samsung ‘mini’ editions) - including an Infinity Edge display - and that’s not all.  Ice Universe also claims to have seen the full sized Galaxy S9. The key takeaways are it will have a dual lens rear camera just like the Galaxy Note 8 but, unlike any current smartphone, the Galaxy S9 camera lenses will have a BBAR coating. This stands for ‘broad-band anti-reflection’ and it prevents glare, ghosting and reflections. Currently only professional DSLRs use this.   Other tidbits include Samsung supplying all Galaxy S9 models with wireless AKG earphones and yet also retaining the headphone jack, which is increasingly a key differentiator to smartphone rivals.

What makes all this so interesting is Ice Universe has a very good track record. Over the last year the leaker was first to  nail the Galaxy Note 8 design and delivered the first real world photos of the Galaxy S8.  Consequently 2018 really does look set to be a bumper one for Samsung. After all it isn’t just the foldable phones and three Galaxy S9 models that will attract attention, it is also the fact Samsung is looking to make more affordable midrange models really stand out as well…

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GameStop Is Literally Giving Away Xbox 360s On Black Friday

GameStop Is Literally Giving Away Xbox 360s On Black Friday | Internet of Things - Company and Research Focus | Scoop.it
This Black Friday, GameStop is offering an Xbox 360 for the low price of $0.
Richard Platt's insight:

GameStop is offering an Xbox 360 for $59.99, complete with a mail-in rebate for $59.99. So, if I'm doing my math correctly that would make this Xbox 360 come in just around $0. That's right, GameStop is literally giving away Xbox 360s.  For one thing, this is a hilarious bet on the laziness of the average American consumer, as are all mail-in rebates: GameStop is clearly betting that the number of people enticed by this concept will far exceed the number of people that can actually be bothered to deal with the mail-in rebate.

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Tesla Roadster 2020 Presentation Extended Highlights

Elon Musk presents Tesla Roadster 2020 within November 16th Launch Event. Tesla Semi has amazing battery performance and stunning design. This vehicle i
Richard Platt's insight:

Repost (previous poster didn't have copyright to put on Youtube):

The new model car, slated for 2020 production, is off the hook, 0-60 in 1.9 sec's, and 0-100 in 4.2 sec's, the fastest production car in the world (both would be Guinness Book of World Records), and with a range of 620 miles / 1000 kilometers on a full charge.  The Semi Truck is cool too, but hey i'm a car guy  

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Intel Optane DIMMs Coming Second Half Of 2018

Intel Optane DIMMs Coming Second Half Of 2018 | Internet of Things - Company and Research Focus | Scoop.it
Intel Optane DIMMs are finally coming, but we'll have to wait until the second half of 2018. Hopefully we'll hear more details in early 2018.
Richard Platt's insight:

Intel finally set a date for Optane DIMMs, saying during a presentation at the USB Global Technology Conference that we'd see them sometime in the second half of 2018, a mere three years after Intel and Micron made the historic 3D XPoint announcement. These DIMMs will function as a memory-mapped device, but with much higher density than DDR4 memory.  This year we've seen the the storage side of 3D XPoint in the form of the DC P4800X Optane SSD for the data center, Optane 3D XPoint Memory for HDD caching, and finally, the Intel Optane SSD 900P, which the first Optane desktop-based bootable SSD. Getting details about Optane DIMMs has been difficult, likely because the execution has been met with a host of challenges. Bringing such increased memory density in a vastly more affordable product is, apparently, no easy task.

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Apple under investigation in patent infringement dispute

Apple under investigation in patent infringement dispute | Internet of Things - Company and Research Focus | Scoop.it
The US International Trade Commission will investigate a complaint that accuses Apple of using patents without permission.
Richard Platt's insight:

The commission, which is already investigating complaints against Apple over its legal spat with Qualcomm, said Tuesday that it's investigating a patent infringement dispute related to a lawsuit filed by Aqua Connect and its wholly owned subsidiary Strategic Technology Partners. Aqua Connect is a Nevada company but has its headquarters in Orange, California.

The companies claim that Apple is using patented designs without permission to build screen-sharing and remote desktop server features for Macs, iPods, iPhones, iPads and Apple TV. They filed the complaint on October 10 in US District Court for the Central District of  California.  Apple did not immediately respond to a request for comment.  "Initially, our product had Apple's full support. But years later, Apple built our technology into its macOS and iOS operating systems without our permission," Ronnie Exley, Aqua Connect's CEO, said in a statement. Aqua Connect said it wants Apple to stop using its technology in devices. The commission has the power to ban products from entering the US, which is often enough of a threat that companies will settle their issues out of court.

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Narrowbody Nirvana

Narrowbody Nirvana | Internet of Things - Company and Research Focus | Scoop.it
Demand for used and new narrowbody aircraft is strong
Richard Platt's insight:

"Despite recent airline bankruptcies at Air Berlin and Monarch, we've seen an uptick in single-aisle demand, both new and used, such that the Monarch and Air Berlin aircraft across most lessors have been rapidly placed," John Plueger, Air Lease Corp. president and CEO, told analysts on a recent earnings call. Air Lease had five narrowbodies with the two carriers.   AerCap found itself with 12 narrowbodies back in its hands. As of Nov. 2, it had firm or verbal agreements to put 10 of them in service with new airlines, and expected deals on the remaining two soon enough.  Equally importantly, the aircraft are being snapped up at what Plueger terms "normal market rates."  Strong traffic growth is the primary driver. IATA figures show that global revenue passenger kilometers were up 7.7% year-to-date through September.

The tight market is getting help from struggles that the Airbus A320neo program is facing. Both of the aircraft's engine suppliers, CFM and Pratt & Whitney, have been hit with production delays this year that have slowed the delivery pipeline. The problem is more severe with Pratt's geared turbofan; CFM executives are confident that their gap will be closed by year-end.

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Kodak Raises the Bar with New Professional 3D Printer - Special Discounted Price

Kodak Raises the Bar with New Professional 3D Printer - Special Discounted Price | Internet of Things - Company and Research Focus | Scoop.it
The word is out that Kodak has entered the 3D printing market. With its announcement of a new dual-extruder, fully enclosed printer and wide line of premium filaments, the company seeks to bring solutions for creative professionals.

Via Jinbuhm Kim
Richard Platt's insight:

The word is out that Kodak has entered the 3D printing market. With its announcement of a new dual-extruder, fully enclosed printer and wide line of premium filaments, the company seeks to bring solutions for creative professionals.

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Nvidia CEO: Gaming will be huge, but so will AI and data center businesses

Nvidia CEO: Gaming will be huge, but so will AI and data center businesses | Internet of Things - Company and Research Focus | Scoop.it
Nvidia reported a stellar quarter for the three months ended October 31. Nvidia had $2.6 billion in revenue in the quarter, and $1.5 billion of it came from graphics chips for gaming PCs. But the company’s investment in artificial intelligence chips is paying off, with data center growing beyond $500 million in revenue for the first time.
Richard Platt's insight:

Nvidia reported a stellar quarter for the three months ended October 31. Nvidia had $2.6 billion in revenue in the quarter, and $1.5 billion of it came from graphics chips for gaming PCs. But the company’s investment in artificial intelligence chips is paying off, with data center growing beyond $500 million in revenue for the first time.   Jensen Huang, CEO of Santa Clara, California-based Nvidia, said his company started investing in AI seven years ago, and that its latest AI chips are the result of years of work by several thousand engineers. That has given the company an edge in AI, and other rivals are scrambling to keep up, he said. I interviewed Huang on Thursday, after his company’s earnings call, and we talked about everything from self-driving car predictions to cryptocurrency mining. 

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IBM says radical new ‘in-memory’ computing architecture will speed up computers 200 times

IBM says radical new ‘in-memory’ computing architecture will speed up computers 200 times | Internet of Things - Company and Research Focus | Scoop.it

IBM Research announced Tuesday (Oct. 24, 2017) that its scientists have developed the first “in-memory computing” or “computational memory” computer system architecture, which is expected to yield yield 200x improvements in computer speed and energy efficiency — enabling ultra-dense, low-power, massively parallel computing systems.

 

Their concept is to use one device (such as phase change memory or PCM*) for both storing and processing information. That design would replace the conventional “von Neumann” computer architecture, used in standard desktop computers, laptops, and cellphones, which splits computation and memory into two different devices. That requires moving data back and forth between memory and the computing unit, making them slower and less energy-efficient.

 

The researchers used PCM devices made from a germanium antimony telluride alloy, which is stacked and sandwiched between two electrodes. When the scientists apply a tiny electric current to the material, they heat it, which alters its state from amorphous (with a disordered atomic arrangement) to crystalline (with an ordered atomic configuration). The IBM researchers have used the crystallization dynamics to perform computation in memory.

 

The researchers believe this new prototype technology will enable ultra-dense, low-power, and massively parallel computing systems that are especially useful for AI applications. The researchers tested the new architecture using an unsupervised machine-learning algorithm running on one million phase change memory (PCM) devices, successfully finding temporal correlations in unknown data streams.

 

“This is an important step forward in our research of the physics of AI, which explores new hardware materials, devices and architectures,” says Evangelos Eleftheriou, PhD, an IBM Fellow and co-author of an open-access paper in the peer-reviewed journal Nature Communications. “As the CMOS scaling laws break down because of technological limits, a radical departure from the processor-memory dichotomy is needed to circumvent the limitations of today’s computers.”

 

“Memory has so far been viewed as a place where we merely store information, said Abu Sebastian, PhD. exploratory memory and cognitive technologies scientist, IBM Research and lead author of the paper. But in this work, we conclusively show how we can exploit the physics of these memory devices to also perform a rather high-level computational primitive. The result of the computation is also stored in the memory devices, and in this sense the concept is loosely inspired by how the brain computes.” Sebastian also leads a European Research Council funded project on this topic.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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IBM Research announced Tuesday that its scientists have developed the first “in-memory computing” or “computational memory” computer system architecture, which is expected to yield yield 200x improvements in computer speed and energy efficiency — enabling ultra-dense, low-power, massively parallel computing systems.  Their concept is to use one device (such as phase change memory or PCM*) for both storing and processing information. That design would replace the conventional “von Neumann” computer architecture, used in standard desktop computers, laptops, and cellphones, which splits computation and memory into two different devices. That requires moving data back and forth between memory and the computing unit, making them slower and less energy-efficient.  The researchers used PCM devices made from a germanium antimony telluride alloy, which is stacked and sandwiched between two electrodes. When the scientists apply a tiny electric current to the material, they heat it, which alters its state from amorphous (with a disordered atomic arrangement) to crystalline (with an ordered atomic configuration). The IBM researchers have used the crystallization dynamics to perform computation in memory.  The researchers believe this new prototype technology will enable ultra-dense, low-power, and massively parallel computing systems that are especially useful for AI applications. The researchers tested the new architecture using an unsupervised machine-learning algorithm running on one million phase change memory (PCM) devices, successfully finding temporal correlations in unknown data streams.

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Inside Apple’s Struggle to Get the IPhone X to Market on Time

Inside Apple’s Struggle to Get the IPhone X to Market on Time | Internet of Things - Company and Research Focus | Scoop.it
The company let suppliers reduce accuracy of the phone’s Face ID system to speed up production.
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As Wall Street analysts and fan blogs watched for signs that the company would stumble, Apple came up with a solution: It quietly told suppliers they could reduce the accuracy of the face-recognition technology to make it easier to manufacture, according to people familiar with the situation.   With the iPhone X set to debut on Nov. 3, we're about to find out whether the move has paid off. Some analysts say there may still be too few iPhone Xs to meet initial demand. Ming-Chi Kuo of KGI Securities predicts Apple will have two to three million handsets available on launch day and 25 million to 30 million units for the holiday quarter, down from his previous forecast of 40 million. For comparison, Apple sold 78 million phones during the same period last year, although that included all models.  Apple is famously demanding, leaning on suppliers and contract manufacturers to help it make technological leaps and retain a competitive edge. The company’s decision to downgrade the accuracy of its Face ID system—if only a little—shows how hard it’s becoming to create cutting-edge features that consumers are hungry to try. And while Apple has endured delays and supply constraints in the past, those typically have been restricted to certain iPhone colors or less important offerings such as the Apple Watch. This time the production hurdles affected a 10th-anniversary phone expected to generate much of the company’s revenue. Apple declined to comment. 

 About a month ago, Foxconn Technology Group pulled as many as 200 workers off an iPhone X production line. Apple was struggling to get sufficient components for the phone and needed fewer people to put it together. The main culprit, the people said, was the 3-D sensor that recognizes faces and unlocks the handset. Foxconn declined to comment.
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Prominent Positioning by AAR

Prominent Positioning by AAR | Internet of Things - Company and Research Focus | Scoop.it
AAR has diversity, heft to beat back OEM pushes.
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AAR Corp. is a pretty big player in the aftermarket game. It's the largest third-party airframe provider in the Americas, Aviation Week's latest survey shows. The company generates about $1.8 billion in annual sales—more than 80% from its aftermarket work, including both civil and defense.  So it stands to reason that AAR is paying close attention to Boeing Global Services, the most visible of multiple OEM efforts to capture the type of aftermarket work that AAR, which does not service engines, chases.  "Our relationship with Boeing today is their supplier, their customer and their competitor," says David Storch, AAR CEO, noting that Boeing was one of the competitors that AAR beat out for a recently awarded fly-dubai 737 Max component support deal.   Storch sees AAR as well-positioned with deep expertise on platforms from multiple OEMs. Not long after the flydubai deal, it announced a similar agreement with Hawaiian Airlines for Airbus A321neos, for instance.  "I think we offer speed, customer familiarization, [and] a broader product line offering in that we can support not just your Boeing fleet but also your Airbus and Bombardier and Embraer fleets," Storch says. "And this is our core fundamental business."   AAR has spent the last several years building its supply chain businesses, but its air-frame MRO activities--which truly set it apart from the OEMs--are not being ignored. In just the last week, it has snapped up two former Pinnacle Aviation shops and cut three new deals with Air Canada, extending A320 and Embraer 190 airframe work and landing 767 work. It is poised to announce a narrow-body air-frame deal with a major U.S. carrier—bet on United Airlines—that will ensure its Duluth, Minn., shop stays busy. And it's still hunting for its first long-term customer at its Rockford, Ill., wide-body facility.

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GE Aviation's New Data Partnership

GE Aviation's New Data Partnership | Internet of Things - Company and Research Focus | Scoop.it
New airline-focused partnership was unveiled on Oct. 17.
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GE Aviation and data and analytics company Teradata have created a strategic partnership to provide analytics-driven business insights and services for the world's airlines.

Through the partnership, GE and Teradata will jointly provide products and services to specified commercial aviation markets. The two companies' strategic relationship will include joint marketing, sales, services and support across both companies to form complete market-ready solutions.  “Teradata and GE Aviation are working together to help customers use analytics to solve complex issues with quick, comprehensive insights that are critical for business decisions,” says Oliver Ratzesberger, executive vice president and chief product officer at Teradata.  The partnership intends to combine operations, assets and networks from GE Aviation with Teradata's customer information, sales, marketing and back-office support to make their data-analytics products and services easier to deploy, scale and use.

For example, GE Aviation can actively manage an airline's flight-disruptions and Teradata can manage the carrier's associated customer-experience activities at the same time, they say.

The two companies state that, by combining the respective solutions they offer, they will enhance their ability to manage flight disruptions for any given customer airline by adding information about managing parts inventories, logistics, scheduling and labor pools.

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Old Galaxy S7 Beats iPhone 8 in New Report

Old Galaxy S7 Beats iPhone 8 in New Report | Internet of Things - Company and Research Focus | Scoop.it
Samsung's handsets reign supreme against Apple's iPhones, according to a new Consumer Reports ranking.
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In a new rating Consumer Reports has released, the testing organization has awarded the Galaxy S8 and Galaxy S8+ scores of 81 out of a possible 100, topping the iPhone 8's score of 80. What's worse, despite receiving the same score, Consumer Reports actually recommends the Galaxy S7, with its own score of 80, over Apple's new handsets.  Apple unveiled the iPhone 8 and iPhone 8 Plus at a press event last month. Since then, the company's smartphone has been called into question by industry pundits who wonder if it's having trouble attracting customers. In fact, one recent report says the iPhone 7 is outselling the new iPhone 8.  After its release last month, Apple's iPhone 8 units were still readily available on store shelves — a phenomenon that we hadn't seen in previous generations. That was followed by reports that the iPhone 8 wasn't selling nearly as well as Apple had planned, and bolstered by reports that customers instead were waiting on the iPhone X.  For its part, Apple hasn't commented much on the iPhone 8's success, or lack thereof, and the company typically doesn't break out sales by device type.  Consumer Reports has long been one of the most trusted services for consumers to determine which products they should buy. That the publication prefers not only Apple's biggest competitor this year, but also the smartphone Samsung launched last year, is notable.  So, where does the Galaxy S7 Edge out Apple's iPhone 8? According to Consumer Reports, the Galaxy S7's "handset capabilities" are slightly better than those in the iPhone 8, and it found Samsung's handset to offer better battery life and call quality.

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