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Info for lawyers and clients nationwide about drug lawsuits, medical device lawsuits, defective product lawsuits, environmental lawsuits, toxic torts, mass torts, and connecting the injured people with networks of experienced personal injury and environmental lawyers nationwide using the Internet, social medial marketing, online video and cutting-edge technology. Internet lawyers expanding law practice beyond their own state borders using online legal marketing.
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Be careful who you recommend on LinkedIn

Be careful who you recommend on LinkedIn | Internet Lawyer | Scoop.it
In the wake of the public shaming of Pax Dickinson, it really does matter who you recommend on LinkedIn.
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Google, Microsoft Press Lawsuits for Right to Release More ...

Google, Microsoft Press Lawsuits for Right to Release More ... | Internet Lawyer | Scoop.it
Perennial competitors in the search realm, Google and Microsoft have set down their swords to press the U.S. government in court for the right to publish statistics on secret surveillance demands against their customers, the ...
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Patent 'trolls' hit Apple with 171 lawsuits in last 5 years - AppleInsider

Patent 'trolls' hit Apple with 171 lawsuits in last 5 years - AppleInsider | Internet Lawyer | Scoop.it
After being hit with 171 lawsuits from non-practicing intellectual property owning entities in the last five years, Apple has further solidified its place as the No.
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Rescooped by Michael J. Evans from Surfing the Broadband Bit Stream
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In ACLU lawsuit, scientist demolishes NSA’s “It’s just metadata” excuse | Ars Technica

In ACLU lawsuit, scientist demolishes NSA’s “It’s just metadata” excuse | Ars Technica | Internet Lawyer | Scoop.it

When the scandal about the National Security Agency (NSA) leaks first broke, one of the government's talking points quickly became that its giant database of domestic phone calls was simply "metadata."

 

"Nobody is listening to your telephone calls," said President Barack Obama a few days after the program became public. "That’s not what this program’s about... by sifting through this so-called metadata, they may identify potential leads with respect to folks who might engage in terrorism."

 

Privacy activists noted that the "metadata" held plenty of private information. Just six days after the Snowden NSA leaks revealed that the government was collecting essentially all telephone call "metadata," the ACLU filed a new lawsuit challenging the practice as unconstitutional.

 

Yesterday, the ACLU filed a declaration by Princeton Computer Science Prof. Edward Felten to support its quest for a preliminary injunction in that lawsuit. Felten, a former technical director of the Federal Trade Commission, has testified to Congress several times on technology issues, and he explained why "metadata" really is a big deal. 


Storage and data-mining have come a long way in the past 35 years, Felten notes, and metadata is uniquely easy to analyze—unlike the complicated data of a call itself, with variations in language, voice, and conversation style. "This newfound data storage capacity has led to new ways of exploiting the digital record," writes Felten. "Sophisticated computing tools permit the analysis of large datasets to identify embedded patterns and relationships, including personal details, habits, and behaviors." 


There are already programs that make it easy for law enforcement and intelligence agencies to analyze such data, like IBM's Analyst's Notebook. IBM offers courses on how to use Analyst's Notebook to understand call data better.

 

Click headline to read more--


Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Michael J. Evans's insight:

The tragic events of the terrorist attack on 9/11 allowed George Bush and Congress to stampede the American people (once known for their love of liberty) to agree to things such as secret laws, secret courts, and surveillance without probable cause. One would have hoped President Obama would have restored privacy and civil rights, but history shows that power, once grasped, is hard to release. This country may never again have the rights to privacy and free speech that it enjoyed most of my life, and for that I am sad.

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Yelp Sues Over Fake Law Firm Reviews - Today's General Counsel

Yelp Sues Over Fake Law Firm Reviews - Today's General Counsel | Internet Lawyer | Scoop.it
Michael J. Evans's insight:

This appears to be a great, but highly embarrassing and wrong, way to get publicity for your law firm.

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Bayer is suing a whole continent for saving the bees? | SumOfUs.org

Bayer is suing a whole continent for saving the bees? | SumOfUs.org | Internet Lawyer | Scoop.it

Wow. Bayer has just sued the European Commission to overturn a ban on the pesticides that are killing millions of bees around the world. A huge public push won this landmark ban only months ago -- and we can't sit back and let Big Pesticide overturn it while the bees vanish.

 

Bayer and Syngenta, two of the world's largest chemical corporations, claim that the ban is "unjustified" and "disproportionate." But clear scientific evidence shows their products are behind the massive bee die-off that puts our entire food chain in peril. 


Just last month, 37 million bees were discovered dead on a single Canadian farm. And unless we act now, the bees will keep dying. We have to show Bayer now that we won't tolerate it putting its profits ahead of our planet's health. If this giant corporation manages to bully Europe into submission, it would spell disaster for the bees.


Sign the petition to tell Bayer and Syngenta to drop their bee-killing lawsuits now. 


The dangerous chemical Bayer makes is a neonicotinoid, or neonic. Neonics are soaked into seeds, spreading through the plant and killing insects stopping by for a snack. These pesticides can easily be replaced by other chemicals which don’t have such a devastating effect on the food chain. But companies like Bayer and Syngenta make a fortune from selling neonics -- so they’ll do everything they can to protect their profits.

 

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Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
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NFL, retired players settle concussion lawsuits - SBNation.com

NFL, retired players settle concussion lawsuits - SBNation.com | Internet Lawyer | Scoop.it
The league and some 4500 players have reached a $765 million agreement.
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Frackers Sued for Causing Earthquakes - Oh #FRACKNO #IdleNoMore

Frackers Sued for Causing Earthquakes - Oh #FRACKNO #IdleNoMore | Internet Lawyer | Scoop.it

Five federal lawsuits mark the first attempt to link drilling and quakes.

 

According to Reuters, over a dozen residents of Greenbrier have filed five federal lawsuits against the drillers, marking the first legal attempt to link earthquakes to wastewater wells:

The first of the suits, filed in U.S. District Court in Eastern Arkansas, is scheduled to go to trial before Judge J. Leon Holmes next March, though the parties have been engaged in settlement talks, according to the court docket.

The Arkansas Independent Producers & Royalty Owners, an oil and gas industry group, acknowledges that scientists found a possible connection between the disposal wells and the spate of minor quakes in and around Greenbrier.

But J. Kelly Robbins, the group’s executive vice president, said the companies had no way of knowing of any such link before wastewater injection began, and he said the operators shut the wells down when questions were raised.

Other civil lawsuits have been raised against natural gas companies in the U.S. — about 40 since 2009 — but most of those focused on the health and environmental consequences, and none have made it to trial. And if these new suits succeed, Reuters points out, they won’t just target fracking, as wastewater injection wells are used in other types of drilling as well.


Via Sarah LittleRedfeather Kalmanson
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Sarah LittleRedfeather Kalmanson's curator insight, August 29, 2013 3:23 PM

Five federal lawsuits mark the first attempt to link drilling and quakes. Oh #FRACKNO #IdleNoMore