If You Don't Have Anything Nice to Say
60 views | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Chris Bowling
Scoop.it!

The logic of Russian Internet censorship

The logic of Russian Internet censorship | If You Don't Have Anything Nice to Say | Scoop.it
Why Russia blocks some opposition Web sites but not others.
Chris Bowling's insight:

Wilson, Steven. "The logic of Russian Internet censorship." Monkey Cage. The Washington Post. 16 March 2014. Web. 8 July 2014.

 

In this blog post by Steven Wilson, a doctoral student at the University of Wisconson-Madison, a gripping point of view is given that shows the political push and pull involving censorship. He literally refers to the Russian government shutting down several opposition websites. Wilson believes this to be more a political statement more than just web control. He states that one of the websites that contained explicit material wasn't shut down because the servers on which it is hosted are physically in the United States. This sets up a interesting spin on the subject that could create friction between the two countries. I plan on using this blog as a reference to the can of worms that can be opened when discussing the possibilities of internet censorship.  This relates to the story by involving not only the innocent people that were involved but also an entire different country'; showing the expansive power of the topic. The author's point on the subject is to show the political thought that goes deeper than most would associate with internet censorship. While this is a blog by a student, he gives some interesting points that  I believe it to be applicable with my argument.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chris Bowling
Scoop.it!

The Right to Be Forgotten - Stanford Law Review

The Right to Be Forgotten - Stanford Law Review | If You Don't Have Anything Nice to Say | Scoop.it
At the end of January, the European Commissioner for Justice, Fundamental Rights, and Citizenship, Viviane Reding, announced the European Commission’s proposal to create a sweeping new privacy right—the “right to be forgotten.” The right, which has been hotly debated in Europe for the past few years, has finally been codified as part of a broad new
Chris Bowling's insight:

Rosen, Jeffrey. "The Right to Be Forgotten." Stanford Law Review 64 (2012): 88. Web. 8 July 2014.

 

This article gives an example of recent controversy that involves censorship.  The 'right to be forgotten' that is referenced refers to the reasonably new law that states that a person has the right to force the removal of embarrassing information as a search result. This act being enforced in Europe is placing on the American company Google is a conflicting situation. This hotly debated topic provides a cultural clashing point between American and European views on the subject. This broadly scripted legislature not only affects what people wish not to be on the internet anymore, but also those that are criminals that wish for their crimes to not be slanderous, even after their time has been served. Such a problem in the United States would be covered by the First Amendment, but the vicarious nature of this article would possibly give too much power needlessly. This article represents the interest of those against the idea of censorship. Even though this legislature doesn't directly cover that, it could be bent to the point of fundamental obscurity of the law's purpose. I plan to use this article as reference to the loopholes that can be created to inadvertently leads to total censorship. This scholarly journal is descriptive and not biased making it an excellent choice to back my argument.   

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chris Bowling
Scoop.it!

Big Brother

Big Brother | If You Don't Have Anything Nice to Say | Scoop.it
Chris Bowling's insight:

Chappatte. "Internet Censorship." Online Image. n.d. ict4bop.wordpress.com. Web. 7 July 2014.

 

In this image, the audience is given an example of internet censorship. Showing a person browsing the internet seemingly enjoying their time, while simultaneously being watched by an official of some sort. This picture leaves the question open of what content  triggers observation by the official. This open ended picture can imply that privacy violations occur simply because of laws that have nothing to do with the search of the user. This is related to the story by enacting what would be happening to every internet user if complete control is given to the governments in power. It also ties in with the pro's of the argument that this official is protecting their country in some way. By internet censorship, this image can be inferred a number of different ways, making it a viable option for my point of view. I plan on making use of this image through my portion covering the pros and cons of my argument. Explicitly, this picture will be shown in a negative light, giving my argument an ethical edge. I believe this image has a concise and reasonable point that will strengthen my subject. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chris Bowling
Scoop.it!

McGraw-Hill Reader: Issues Across the Disciplines

Esther Dyson, "Cyberspace: If You Don't Love It, Leave It"

Chris Bowling's insight:

Dyson, Esther. "Cyberspace: If You Don't Love It, Leave It." The McGraw-Hill Reader: Issues Across  the Disciplines. Ed. Gilbert H. Muller. New York: The Mcgraw HIll Companies, Inc., 2011. Print.

 

In Esther Dyson's essay, "Cyberspace: If You Don't Love It, Leave It," she shows some extreme bias against the argument for more internet censorship. Relating cyberspace as real estate, she claims that the internet is not as evil as politicians make it out to be. Dyson also points out that the internet is somewhere you go to, not a place you just magically end up at...you have to choose where you go. She finishes off by stating that there is no perfect solution that people tend to seek. This article greatly influences my paper by separating her argument into pro's, cons, and suggestions to the issue at hand. Since I plan on breaking my argument into a similar structure, Dyson serves as a shining example to provide credibility to the subject. I intend on using her essay to back the idea of the internet  being butchered by politicians, even though they may have the best intentions. This essay is going to be the basis of my argument, with my other secondary to back my claim. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chris Bowling
Scoop.it!

The Past, Present and Future of Internet Censorship - YouTube

TRANSCRIPT AND SOURCES: http://www.corbettreport.com/?p=3827 In recent weeks the general public has mobilized to face US legislative threats to Internet free...
Chris Bowling's insight:

corbettreport. "The Past, Present, and Future of Internet Censorship." Youtube. Youtube, LLC, 28 Jan. 2012. Web. 8 July 2014.

 

In this video, the narrator delivers a constant flow of the wide spread issues engulfing internet security.  He delves into his topic regarding the many countries that are already active in controlling the flow of cyberspace. He also sheds some light to the fact that many countries already have programs and legislature in place involving minor and major censorship. Slightly against the argument suggested through his tone, the narrator relies primarily on mainstream news sources to gather his information. Using sources such as CNN  and C SPAN gives validation to his opinion. This video provides numerous examples to my argument against internet censorship. One example is the use of an agency, suggested by Bill Clinton, as a mere form of internet control with positive intentions. This type of agency is used to prevent fraudulent claims on the internet. The clip also provides some thought to alternative actions opposite of that totalitarian like system that raises many in arms. I plan on incorporating this source in the section of my paper that introduces various forms of positive internet censorship. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chris Bowling
Scoop.it!

In China, Avoiding The 'Great Firewall' Internet Censors

In China, Avoiding The 'Great Firewall'  Internet Censors | If You Don't Have Anything Nice to Say | Scoop.it
In China, the Internet isn't the free-for-all that it is in the United States. China's communist government censors what's published and some of what's shared online. But some citizens are working around government censors by using agreed-upon "public" code.
Chris Bowling's insight:

"In China, Avoiding The 'Great Firewall' Internet Censors." All Things Considered. Host Jacki Lyden. npr.org. 7 Sept. 2013. Web. 8 July 2014.

 

In this podcast, the two speakers are discussing the cyber curtain that is held over China. They discuss a couple events such as the June fourth Tiananmen Square massacre and protest. The general public being savvy to censorship have developed common knowledge to counteract this block of information. Using the phrase May thirty-fifth would be a key example of this. This 'Great Firewall' that China has employed only breeds ingenuity of the population to gather and release information. This will be used to develop my argument that freedom of speech can not be censored to the point that governments seem to want. It is directed at those who are interested in the Chinese governments attempt at information control. Once again I believe that this podcast can be used to set boundaries for both parties in the argument for internet censorship. Being as it is from NPR and the speaker is a professor at UC-Berkeley and the editor of the China DIgital TImes, I will use this podcast to provide credibility to my argument that internet censorship at some level will constantly be uprooted.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chris Bowling
Scoop.it!

Censorship throughout the world

Censorship throughout the world | If You Don't Have Anything Nice to Say | Scoop.it
Chris Bowling's insight:

"Censorship throughout the world." Chart. n.d. isocindiachennai.org. Web. 8 July 2014.

 

This image gives a visual representation of the countries amount of censorship. Letting a color represent the quality or amount of censorship allows the audience to see the places where that kind internet censorship is found. Asia, as an example, comes to sight immediately showing the immense amount of control that country has over information. This image interest both parties in the sense that there is some level of control throughout the world. Though it interest both parties, the image is directed more towards those against internet censorship because of the information based off of Reporters Without Borders. I would use this in my argument as a example to the control that is being placed among the internet users of the world. Though there may be a need for some level of control, the people that it involves are merely regarded as innocent bystanders. Being that it is a image I can use this to provide evidence for both sides of the argument, strengthening my point of view.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chris Bowling
Scoop.it!

Battling Internet Censorship Must Evolve, Study Says

Battling Internet Censorship Must Evolve, Study Says | If You Don't Have Anything Nice to Say | Scoop.it
A detailed examination of Web filtering and blocking in Iran and China offers information on how to combat the techniques.
Chris Bowling's insight:

Markoff, John. "Internet Censorship Growth Hampers News, Study Says." New York TImes. New York Times. 11 Oct. 2011. Web. 8 July 2014.

 

This article by the New York Times shows some of the diverse subjects that are being drawn in to this battle. Some of which go back farther than the internet itself. According to this article, government censorship goes back to at least World War II, allowing us to base our opinions on the results of past attempts. The newspaper article specifically is referring to the subjugation of broadcasters attempting to relay news to censored countries. This back and forth is an attempt to break the generalizing mold that censorship encompasses. This is related to the story by discussing the wide net that internet censorship tries to cast. A argument that is this widely spread throughout time gives purpose to the people that fight for this freedom of information. I plan on incorporating this article to show that generalization in legislature will never pass amongst the people that it involves. I believe this article gives concise, clear points for my argument that internet censorship can not be so simply covered. The New York Times is one of the most reputable newspapers in the world, therefore I think that it is a reliable source that could better my argument. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chris Bowling
Scoop.it!

Online Liberty Threatened By Nation-State Crackdowns - Technology News - redOrbit

Online Liberty Threatened By Nation-State Crackdowns - Technology News - redOrbit | If You Don't Have Anything Nice to Say | Scoop.it
The open Internet could be challenged by nation-states that look to maintain security and political control, and in the next decade this could lead to more blocking, filtering, segmentation and even balkanization of the Internet.
Chris Bowling's insight:

Suciu, Peter. "Future of the Internet Worrisome For Some Web Experts." redorbit.com. n.p. 3 July 2014. Web. 8 July 2014.

 

In this article, the author focuses more on the negatives that could arise with censorship. He discusses several studies with more than 13,000 internet expert participants over the span of a decade. These studies entail these expert opinions on the future of cyberspace and the dangers that could be applied presently. The article also opens the idea of smaller devices, such as cell phones, being a much more difficult task to control information. This is related to my argument because of the straight-forward negative tone of the paper in relation to the point of the discussion. It also provides credibility to the idea that the more restrictions come for censorship, the greater the response of the general public. I plan on using this article to back my claim of the negative effect of censoring information. I will tie the information in with the current systems in place to control cyberspace and how they have adverse outcomes than intended. I believe that this source clearly brings objective ideas that will back my claim. It is a reliable source through the means of using respectable surveys in great numbers to create a generally unbiased opinion. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Chris Bowling
Scoop.it!

The Internet Censorship Controversy

Chris Bowling's insight:

 Qazi, Usman. "The Internet Censorship Controversy." courses.cs.vt.edu. n.p. 1996? Web. 8 July 2014.

 

In this article, the author gives a wide range of pro's and con's that peer into both sides of the argument. Covering topics such as the history of censorship, freedom of speech issues, child protection, and how all of that information tie in with the growth and development of the internet. This piece greatly relates to my argument as it lays the basis for the argument itself. Establishing a non-bias variety of topics that will give the audience a sense of dependability. The author's essay, being sent in seemingly as a class assignment, attempts to avoid bias by noting a plethora of sources for and against his topic. Being released in 1996 may seem to be a irrelevant source, but I believe it to show integrity for the argument; seeing as how many of the issues discussed are still relevant today. I believe this article to be extremely readable and informative and the author to be well informed on his subject. The time period that this was written shows just how influential technology became. In the 7 or so years that the internet was public a boom of growth among the United States  was born and with it a slew of new issues to be handled. I plan on using this article when introducing the general aspects of the topic that I will expand from. It will act as a good, reliable source for background information and verification of my topic.

more...
No comment yet.