Global Affairs, Immigration Policy
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Global Affairs, Immigration Policy
The Push And Pull Of International Economic, Political, And Social Factors On U.S. Immigration Law.    https://www.bataraimmigrationlaw.com/asylum-nacara-tps-vawa-attorney.html
Curated by Carlos Batara
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Major Energy Paradigm Shift: World Bank Announces It Will No Longer Fund Oil & Gas Projects

Major Energy Paradigm Shift: World Bank Announces It Will No Longer Fund Oil & Gas Projects | Global Affairs, Immigration Policy | Scoop.it
In a significant policy change, the World Bank announced that it will stop funding most of its oil and gas exploration and extraction projects after 2019.

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Renata Hill's comment, December 31, 2017 1:49 PM
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EU leaders complicit in torture of refugees and migrants, Amnesty says

EU leaders complicit in torture of refugees and migrants, Amnesty says | Global Affairs, Immigration Policy | Scoop.it
Rights group claims EU is financing Libyan system that routinely acts in collusion with militia groups and people traffickers

Via Irial Glynn
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Is Uganda The World's Best Place For Refugees?

Is Uganda The World's Best Place For Refugees? | Global Affairs, Immigration Policy | Scoop.it
Once refugees themselves, Ugandans look to ‘return the good’ to people fleeing war in South Sudan by offering land and help

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The Small African Region With More Refugees Than All Of Europe

The Small African Region With More Refugees Than All Of Europe | Global Affairs, Immigration Policy | Scoop.it
Hunger follows displaced people around north-east Nigeria, as Boko Haram and climate change drive millions from their homes

Via Irial Glynn
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Somalia: The Forgotten Story

Carlos Batara's insight:

 

Critics of pro-immigrant policy consistently attack humanitarian programs like Temporary Protected Status and Asylum.

 

Somalia, one of 13 TPS-designated countries, is one of the countries criticized by opponents of immigration reform.  Yet, only about 300 Somalians are TPS beneficiaries.

 

Other Somalians are forced to seek asylum, even though their home government is hardly classified as a government.

 

Here's the story of Somalia's ongoing civic problems.

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Another Sign Of Immigration Segregation: The Ordeal Of Haitian Migrants At the Mexico - U.S. Border

Another Sign Of Immigration Segregation: The Ordeal Of Haitian Migrants At the Mexico - U.S. Border | Global Affairs, Immigration Policy | Scoop.it
Camped in migrant centers, broken-down rooms of a dingy, semi-derelict hotel and on church floors, thousands of Haitians desperate to enter the United States are in limbo and exposed to crime in dangerous border neighborhoods of Mexico.
Carlos Batara's insight:

 

The U.S. global economy.  It was part of the New World Order declared by Bush I during his initial weeks in office.

 

But there is a downside and it was foreseeable.  As some countries and corporations benefited, many countries and populations would suffer.

 

Here is the United States, much of the media's attention on immigration issues has centered on our Southwestern borders, the dividing line between the U.S. and Mexico. 

 

In recent months, however, these borders have took on a new role, becoming the entry point for immigrants from China, India, Cuba, and now Haitians.

 

Of course, the Mexican border has long been a way into the U.S. The difference, now, is that the numbers are far larger.

 

The adverse effects are spilling over into Mexico.  Since American facilities are overwhelmed and the U.S. conduct asylum credible fear interviews fast enough, many Haitians are being forced to temporarily reside in Mexico - causing the Mexican government to  become more active on immigrant matters. 

 

Unfortunately, the responses to the humanitarian needs of Haitians by both governments leaves quite a bit to be desired - and shows, once again, that the house of immigration reform is woefully segregated.

 

 

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A French Underground Railroad, Moving African Migrants

A French Underground Railroad, Moving African Migrants | Global Affairs, Immigration Policy | Scoop.it
Near the border with Italy, a farmer and his network of “citizen smugglers” have helped hundreds cross the border, in a personal response to his nation’s muddled handling of the crisis.

Via Irial Glynn
Carlos Batara's insight:

 

This is a fascinating, though not unexpected, development in the ongoing global refugee saga.

 

In more ways than one, for those of us living in the U.S., it's almost like history is repeating itself.

 

 

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Venezuelan Food Shortages Force Many To Abandon Their Pets

Venezuelan Food Shortages Force Many To Abandon Their Pets | Global Affairs, Immigration Policy | Scoop.it

The lack of available and affordable food has led to an increasing number of pets being dropped off at shelters, or simply abandoned in the streets.

Carlos Batara's insight:

 

Another bad news story about Venezuela - with images of man's best friends being neglected and abused by man - due to the economic and political crisis taking place there.

 

From The Atlantic:

 

"In recent years, triple-digit inflation, massive food shortages, rising crime rates, and failing public services in Venezuela have forced many families into difficult decisions. The lack of available and affordable food has led to an increasing number of pets being dropped off at shelters, or simply abandoned in the streets."

 

"The Associated Press reports that pet owners say the price of dog food has more than doubled in recent months to $2 a pound, more than a day's pay for those earning the minimum wage.  Reuters photographer Carlos Garcia Rawlins and AP photographer Fernando Llano recently documented the growing number of abandoned dogs and cats in Venezuela's parks, shelters, and private clinics."

 

The photographs, alone, tell the story about the degree of suffering in Venezuela. 

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U.S. Efforts To Halt Central American Refugee Influx Falls Short

U.S. Efforts To Halt Central American Refugee Influx Falls Short | Global Affairs, Immigration Policy | Scoop.it
The U.S. faces a monumental challenge in its mission to cut down the flow of Central Americans streaming across the Rio Grande.
Carlos Batara's insight:

 

To solve the Central American refugee influx, and any of the refugee migrations across the globe, requires an inclusive approach.  In other words, countries need to work together.

 

All aspects of immigration, after all, are not only local, but also global in nature.

 

Let me add a side comment to this article. Some pressure needs to be placed on smugglers.

 

The coyotes guiding Central American refugees are snake oil salesmen. Based on my interviews with refugees, they part with $4,000 to pay their guides, at minimum, per person. (Imagine what it takes to earn $4,000 in Central America.) "The guides" tell the refugees that they'll get into the U.S. due to their situation. They do not tell them that staying here is not the same as getting into the U.S. They do not tell them that staying here will require a court hearing, an immigration trial, detention, and possible deportation back to their country.

 

Reduce their influence, and the migration is likely to slow down.

 

 

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Refugee Protection Act Of 2016 Introduced In Both U.S. Senate And House

Refugee Protection Act Of 2016 Introduced In Both U.S. Senate And House | Global Affairs, Immigration Policy | Scoop.it
Human Rights First’s Refugee Protection Program Director says US Congress should pass legislation that would strengthen protections for refugees and improve the overall effectiveness of the asylum and resettlement process in the United States.
Carlos Batara's insight:

 

The Refugee Protection Act of 2016, which includes provisions to address many of the severe, longstanding problems in the U.S. refugee and asylum systems, was introduced in both the Senate and the House today.

 

Among its many significant provisions, the Refugee Protection Act: 

  • Eliminates the one-year asylum filing deadline that bars refugees with well-founded fears of persecution from asylum;
  • Enhances efficiency of the asylum system by allowing some asylum cases to be resolved at the asylum office level rather than putting them directly into immigration court removal proceedings; 
  • Prevents the unnecessary and prolonged detention of asylum seekers, and requires humane treatment of all immigrants in detention; 
  • Promotes due process and fairness by providing appointed legal counsel to children and particularly vulnerable individuals;
  • Clarifies “nexus” and “particular social group” category, without additional requirement of ‘“social visibility” which could endanger victims of gender persecution or LGBT refugees;
  • Enhances effectiveness of resettlement processing through enhanced transparency, access to counsel, and the facilitation of resettlement consideration for groups whose resettlement is justified as a humanitarian concern or is otherwise in the national interest; 
  • Protects innocent refugees from inappropriate exclusion by revising overly broad immigration definitions that are mislabeling victims of armed groups and terrorist organizations as supporters of terrorism; and
  • Safeguards newly arrived refugees from slipping into poverty and supports local communities.    

 

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Migration Is A Business On Mexico's Southern Border

Migration Is A Business On Mexico's Southern Border | Global Affairs, Immigration Policy | Scoop.it
As people and goods illegally cross the Mexico-Guatemala border, many profit.
Carlos Batara's insight:

 

Smuggling is, a black market business.  It's a also a global business. 

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Is TPS Warranted?  Venezuelan Women Push Past Border Guards To Seek Food

Is TPS Warranted?  Venezuelan Women Push Past Border Guards To Seek Food | Global Affairs, Immigration Policy | Scoop.it
Hundreds of Venezuelan women push past border guards to cross into Colombia to buy food and goods which are scarce in Venezuela.
Carlos Batara's insight:

 

Have the conditions worsened enough in Venezuela to warrant a grant of Temporary Protected Status?

 

Meanwhile, while Americans fight in a hotel over who gets the next waffle, many Venezuela border on near starvation without any waffles for any of them.

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Portugal wants refugees because their population is going down and they see it as an opportunity

Portugal wants refugees because their population is going down and they see it as an opportunity | Global Affairs, Immigration Policy | Scoop.it

Traditionally a country of emigration, Portugal has offered to take up to 10,000 migrants from countries struggling to cope with the influx, to help maintain its own population.


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Abu Dhabi: the city where citizenship is not an option

Abu Dhabi: the city where citizenship is not an option | Global Affairs, Immigration Policy | Scoop.it
Four-fifths of the UAE’s population are classed as ‘foreigners’ – people whose parents were born abroad. With permanent residency impossible, it’s a constant struggle to belong

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The Real Meaning Of Volunteerism And Compassion: The Lisa Campbell Story

The Real Meaning Of Volunteerism And Compassion: The Lisa Campbell Story | Global Affairs, Immigration Policy | Scoop.it

When Lisa Campbell arrived in Greece in November 2015 to help care for the flood of refugees she planned on staying for just a few weeks. She ended up running a refugee camp - until it was suddenly closed last month. 

Carlos Batara's insight:

 

As an immigration attorney, I hear it both ways.  I read about and hear a lot of folks whining and complaining about their bad luck.  

 

I also read about and meet a lot of individuals whose love, bravery, and compassion are second to none.

 

Of course, I prefer the second group of stories.  Here is one, just published by the BBC.

 

In November 2015, Lisa Campbell, an American Mormon and grandmother of six, took a leave of absence for 45 days from work.  She traveled to Greece, intending on doing a short service tour, helping with the recent influx of refugees. The horror stories she heard, and what she experience, led her to quit her job.  She  stayed in Greece for two years, running a refugee camp in Oinofyta, north of Athens.

 

Last month, the camp was closed last month.  Her volunteer visa expires on December 22, 2017, and she'll head back to the U.S. bbecause the Greek government won't let me stay any more.

 

She explains:

 

"I'm not a saint. I've learned that love is a choice. For me, some of the more poignant moments have involved people that I don't necessarily really like. When they were informed that the camp was closing, these people came to me and said things like: "You've been like a mother to me, I don't know what I'm going to do without you." And I realised that I had met my goal - which was to take care of them and show them that they were loved. That they're cared about, not forgotten."

 

Thank you, Mrs. Campbell.  

 

You can read the full story here:  http://www.bbc.com/news/stories-42270275

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5m face famine in North East Nigeria – Alakija | The Sun News

5m face famine in North East Nigeria – Alakija | The Sun News | Global Affairs, Immigration Policy | Scoop.it
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The devastation wrought by Boko Haram, which has left millions of people in northeast Nigeria on the brink of famine, could exacerbate Europe’s migration crisis if the world fails to act urgently, the country’s chief humanitarian coordinator said. Nearly five million people in the region are desperately hungry and risk starving to death this year...

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Ireland Becomes Latest Adherent Of Immigration Trumpism

Ireland Becomes Latest Adherent Of Immigration Trumpism | Global Affairs, Immigration Policy | Scoop.it

Via Irial Glynn
Carlos Batara's insight:

 

For a country that once boasted the '100,000 welcomes' to visitors, Ireland has become the least welcoming country in western Europe for refugees.

 

Last year Ireland nearly double the 2012 figure for deportations.

  

According to immigrant support groups, Ireland is not meeting its commitment to take in 4,000 Syrian refugees as part of the European Union agreed-upon relocation program.  

 

It sounds like the philosophy of Immigration Trumpism is alive and well overseas.

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'Most tortured man in Guantanamo Bay' freed without charge

'Most tortured man in Guantanamo Bay' freed without charge | Global Affairs, Immigration Policy | Scoop.it
A man who is widely regarded as the most tortured prisoner in the history of Guantanamo Bay has been released without charge after nearly 14 years.

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Will The U.S. Open Its Arms To Syrian Refugee Children?

Will The U.S. Open Its Arms To Syrian Refugee Children? | Global Affairs, Immigration Policy | Scoop.it

Most Syrian Refugees Arriving in US Are Kids, Schools Struggle To Adapt

Carlos Batara's insight:

 

In the haste of many to feel negative and hostile resentment to immigrants either trying to enter the U.S. on their own or with the help of resettlement agencies, the tribulations faced by these individuals is discarded at worse, minimized at best.

 

Such views are not warranted.

 

Take the Syrian refugees arriving the U.S.  Although nearly 30 state governments took a position against their placement within their geographic boundaries, nearly 60 percent of the more than 11,000 Syrian arrivals over the past year were children.

 

For background information on how the Syrian civil crisis exploded, see this post: TPS For Syrians: A Humanitarian Crisis .

 

This is a larger percentage than some refugee groups, experts say, because Syrians tend to have larger families and many have managed to stay together despite displacement.

 

Like most immigrant children,Syrian children face the challenge of limited English speaking, writing, and reading abilities.  School administrators, however, feel that the level of their trauma is probably a bigger obstacle to overcome.

 

Of course, fighting through these adverse factors is not made when even adult Syrians are having to deal with distorted and mean-spirited attitudes of their neighbors. 

 

Such stigmatization is not good for the Syrian children or adult Syrians - nor, if the truth be told, for the American public.

 

Therein lies yet another immigration challenge for the U.S. in coming years: when and how much will it opens its arm to bring Syrian refugees and Syrian challenge into the American family?

 

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Will The Industrialized Giants Step Up To Help With The World's 21 Million Refugees?

Will The Industrialized Giants Step Up To Help With The World's 21 Million Refugees? | Global Affairs, Immigration Policy | Scoop.it
Rich nations are shirking responsibility when it comes to refugees, leaving just 10 low and middle income nations with most of the refugee burden, according to a new Amnesty International report.
Carlos Batara's insight:

 

A new report by Amnesty International, "Tackling The Global Refugee Crisis: From Shirking To Sharing Responsibility,"  reveals over 1/2 of the world's refugees live in just 10 countries.  

 

And the 10 countries are not the world's 10 economic giants. Rather, the nations hosting the bulk of refugees are Jordan, Turkey, Pakistan, Lebanon, Iran, Ethiopia, Chad, Uganda, Kenya and the Democratic Republic of Congo.

 

In according to Amnesty International, these 10 countries account for .less than 2.5% of the world’s GDP, creating a  “inherently unsustainable” situation.

 

In my view, the current refugee problems are ultimately related to the push for economic globalization - yet those nations which have gained the most are those which are less willing to share.  

 

Either they step up . . .  or they will eventually share a huge portion of the world's pain and suffering which will be caused by their long term political neglect.    

 

You can download the full report here:  https://www.amnesty.ch/de/themen/asyl-und-migration/dok/2016/studie-zur-weltweiten-fluechtlingskrise/1610_global_refugee_crisis.pdf

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United Nations Summit For Refugees and Migrants Scheduled For September 19, 2016

United Nations Summit For Refugees and Migrants Scheduled For September 19, 2016 | Global Affairs, Immigration Policy | Scoop.it

It will be an all day event on Monday 19 September 2016 at the UNHQ in New York. See the detailed program below or download it here

Carlos Batara's insight:

 

This is the first time the General Assembly has called for a summit at the Heads of State and Government level on large movements of refugees and migrants.

 

It is a watershed moment to strengthen governance of international migration and a unique opportunity for creating a more responsible, predictable system for responding to large movements of refugees and migrants. 

When and where?
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A Detailed Look At How the Arab World Came Apart

A Detailed Look At How the Arab World Came Apart | Global Affairs, Immigration Policy | Scoop.it
The story of more than a decade of war, terror and revolution in the Middle East, seen through the eyes of six people whose lives were changed forever.
Carlos Batara's insight:

 

In this New York Times story, the culmination of 18 months of reporting, the story of the catastrophe that has fractured the Arab world since the invasion of Iraq 13 years ago, leading to the rise of ISIS and the global refugee crisis is told through the eyes of six characters living in Egypt, Libya, Syria, Iraq and Iraqi Kurdistan.

 

In addition, the Times article provides 10 photography portfolios drawn from the last 14 years, as well as a landmark virtual-reality experience that embeds the viewer with the Iraqi fighting forces during the battle to retake Falluja.

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Cuban Asylum-Seekers Expelled From Ecuador

Cuban Asylum-Seekers Expelled From Ecuador | Global Affairs, Immigration Policy | Scoop.it
Ecuador’s National Police and immigration officials detained 149 Cubans last Wednesday. The Cubans had been sleeping in tents in Ecuador’s capital, Quito, to protest their inability to obtain a special humanitarian visa from Mexico that would allow them to travel to the US border, and from there seek asylum in the United States. The police were attempting to disperse the protest.
Carlos Batara's insight:

 

And you thought the U.S. was heavy-handed with its detainees? 

 

"Starting the day after their arrest, July 7, judges conducted a series of deportation hearings in which detainees reportedly only had a few minutes to present their defense. Lawyers reported that they were able to talk to the detainees just minutes before the hearings."

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Why Didn't We Stand With Turkey Like We Did With Paris And Orlando?

Why Didn't We Stand With Turkey Like We Did With Paris And Orlando? | Global Affairs, Immigration Policy | Scoop.it

Are we conditioned to feel content with a tepid reaction from our political leaders to atrocities in Turkey and the Middle East?

 

 

Carlos Batara's insight:

Night was coming on as I arrived in Heathrow airport on Tuesday. In a waiting lounge at the airport’s central bus station, the urgent and meretricious tones of the television news could be heard. A gang of homicidal thugs had massacred 41 innocent people and injured 239 at Turkey’s Ataturk airport. 

 

But then, right there, the media fanfare stopped. Unlike the recent attack in Orlando, or the terrorist assault on the streets of Paris last November, terrorism in Turkey isn’t deemed worthy of a week-long investigation."

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Immigration Comic Relief: Trevor Noah On The UK Immigration History

Carlos Batara's insight:

 

Here is a little comic relief on topics related to the world's immigration history.

 

The video features Trevor Noah, the South African comic who took over for Jon Stewart as host of the Daily Show. When he was a stand up comic, he often discussed issues of immigration.

 

Check it out. You're bound to laugh at some point.

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