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'Pepper' the emotional robot, sells out within a minute - CNN.com

'Pepper' the emotional robot, sells out within a minute - CNN.com | interesting | Scoop.it
(CNN)Pepper the humanoid robot is so hot that he sold out within a minute, according to his Japanese creator, SoftBank Robotics Corp.

Only 1,000 models were available for the consumer launch on Saturday in Japan. The base price was set at ¥198,000 ($1,600) with an additional ¥24,600 ($200) monthly data and insurance fees.

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Widerun: Fahrrad-Training mit Virtual Reality - Heise Newsticker

Widerun: Fahrrad-Training mit Virtual Reality - Heise Newsticker | interesting | Scoop.it
Virtuelle Welten sollen das Training auf dem Heimtrainer spannender machen. Als Grundlage dafür dienen das eigene Fahrrad, eine Halterung sowie eine VR-Brille.
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‘Nanoneedles’ generate new blood vessels in mice, paving the way for new regenerative medicine | KurzweilAI

‘Nanoneedles’ generate new blood vessels in mice, paving the way for new regenerative medicine | KurzweilAI | interesting | Scoop.it
Scientists have developed “nanoneedles” that have successfully prompted parts of the body to generate new blood vessels, in a trial in mice.

The researchers, from Imperial College London and Houston Methodist Research Institute in the USA, hope their nanoneedle technique could ultimately help damaged organs and nerves repair themselves and help transplanted organs thrive.

In a trial described in Nature Materials, the team showed they could deliver nucleic acids DNA and siRNA to back muscles in mice. After seven days there was a six-fold increase in the formation of new blood vessels in the mouse back muscles, and blood vessels continued to form over a 14 day period.

The nanoneedles are tiny porous structures that act as a sponge to load significantly more nucleic acids than solid structures. This makes them more effective at delivering their payload. They can penetrate the cell, bypassing its outer membrane, to deliver nucleic acids without harming or killing the cell.

The nanoneedles are made from biodegradable silicon, meaning that they can be left in the body without leaving a toxic residue behind. The silicon degrades in about two days, leaving behind only a negligible amount of a harmless substance called orthosilicic acid.

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Toward a model of synchrony in brain networks

Toward a model of synchrony in brain networks | interesting | Scoop.it
(MedicalXpress)—Resting state networks (RSNs) in the brain are topographies of neural structures between which lag states propagate due to fluctuations of physical and other activities. Studying these networks reveals information about the functional connectivity of neural structures and regions. Results from various studies have confirmed that brain activity is spatially structured, linked to the representation of function, and has clinical relevance.

Functional connectivity is different from the brain's structural connectivity, which describes brain regions that are anatomically attached to each other. Regions with no structural connectivity can nonetheless have functional connectivity as nodes in a functionally connected RSN. Many common RSNs have been mapped in healthy subjects, and researchers believe that understanding the relationships between these networks can contribute to a fundamental model of brain function.

One of the tremendous advantages of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is the ability to study brain functional activity without the need for subjects to perform complex tasks. Using fMRI to study resting-state functional connectivity yields a wealth of information about different stages of consciousness and patterns of synchronous activity. One of the neurological features that has emerged from such research is the existence of lags in intrinsic activity as represented by fluctuations of the blood-oxygen level-dependent signals (BOLDs), which are temporally synchronous within the somatomotor system.

Last year, researchers at the departments of radiology and neurology at Washington University published an analysis demonstrating that, contrary to the belief that BOLDs were synchronous with resting state networks (RSNs), the lag topography of BOLDs and RSNs is actually orthogonal. Additionally, they established that BOLDs are not attributable to hemodynamic factors and have neural origin.

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Maritha dotws's curator insight, April 4, 2015 8:48 AM

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Inkjet-printed liquid metal could lead to new wearable tech, soft robotics | KurzweilAI

Inkjet-printed liquid metal could lead to new wearable tech, soft robotics | KurzweilAI | interesting | Scoop.it
Purdue University researchers have developed a potential manufacturing method called “mechanically sintered gallium-indium nanoparticles” that can inkjet-print flexible, stretchable conductors onto anything — including elastic materials and fabrics — and can mass-produce electronic circuits made of liquid-metal alloys for “soft robots” and flexible electronics.

The method uses ultrasound to break up liquid metal into nanoparticles in ethanol solvent to make ink that is compatible with inkjet printing.

Elastic technologies could make possible a new class of pliable robots and stretchable garments that people might wear to interact with computers or for therapeutic purposes.

“Liquid metal in its native form is not inkjet-able,” said Rebecca Kramer, an assistant professor of mechanical engineering at Purdue. “So what we do is create gallium-indium liquid metal nanoparticles that are small enough to pass through an inkjet nozzle.

“Sonicating [using ultrasound] liquid metal in a carrier solvent, such as ethanol, both creates the nanoparticles and disperses them in the solvent. Then we can print the ink onto any substrate. The ethanol evaporates away so we are just left with liquid metal nanoparticles on a surface.”

After printing, the nanoparticles must be rejoined by applying light pressure, which renders the material conductive. This step is necessary because the liquid-metal nanoparticles are initially coated with oxidized gallium, which acts as a skin that prevents electrical conductivity.

“But it’s a fragile skin, so when you apply pressure it breaks the skin and everything coalesces into one uniform film,” Kramer said. “We can do this either by stamping or by dragging something across the surface, such as the sharp edge of a silicon tip.”

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Dementia 'halted in mice brains'

Dementia 'halted in mice brains' | interesting | Scoop.it
Tweaking the brain's immune system with a drug has prevented mice developing dementia, a study shows.

The team at Duke University, in the US, showed immune cells which start attacking nutrients in the brain may be a trigger for the disease.

They say their findings could open up new avenues of research for a field that has not developed a single drug to slow the progression of the disease.

Experts said the findings offered new hope of a treatment.

The researchers indentified microglia - normally the first line of defence against infection in the brain - as major players in the development of dementia.

They found some microglia changed to become exceptionally adept at breaking down a component of protein, an amino acid called arginine, in the early stages of the disease.

As arginine levels plummeted, the immune cells appeared to dampened the immune system in the brain.

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3D Printed Eyes with WiFi Connection « NextNature.net

3D Printed Eyes with WiFi Connection « NextNature.net | interesting | Scoop.it
Nowadays 3D printing is increasingly used for medical purposes and body upgrades to design devices, implants, and a variety of customized prosthetics, from a 3D printed face, to a skull, and even organs.

In the future we may look at the world with new – artificial, 3D printed – eyes. Italian research studio MHOX is working on EYE, a 3D bioprinted sight augmentation. The project envisions the removal of the natural visual system and its replacement with a digitally designed 3D printed one. The original retina would be replaced by a new artificial network, able to offer enhanced vision, WiFi connection and the possibility to record video and take pictures.

In the hope of curing blindness and healing conditions, giving better vision, the 3D printed eyes are expected to be available by 2027.

The eyeballs will be constructed with the use of a bio-ink that contains the cells required to replace those found in natural eyes. Once the original pair of eyes is surgically removed, researchers plan on connecting the 3D printed one to a deck inside the head, which would allow the eyes to be inserted.

“We envision that the link between the deck and the EYE will be based on attractive forces between the tissues more than mechanical joints” MHOX designer Filippo Nassetti explains. “To replace the EYE the user only has to put it in position inside the skull, and the tissues of the Deck and the EYE connect automatically”.

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Industrial Revolution III 3D printer places electronics within the objects it creates

Industrial Revolution III 3D printer places electronics within the objects it creates | interesting | Scoop.it
The development of 3D printer technology has been rapidly accelerating, boosted in a large part to the open source community and world-wide sharing of information. There are now literally dozens of brands of 3D printers on the market at all price points, but Buzz Technology Limited, out of London, is looking to stand out from the crowd with its Industrial Revolution III printer (or IR3 for short) that can embed wiring within plastic components using conductive material.

There are printers that print food, printers that use lasers, printers that sinter metal, and printers that make full color objects. Adding to the expanding array of 3D printer capabilities, the IR3 can deposit material to make plastic objects – like other 3D printers – and lay down conductive pathways using other materials. But it can then stick electronic components into the assembly to make a working product. In the example on its Kickstarter page, the printer is used to fabricate, wire and assemble a small radio-control car. The trick here is the ability of the printer to "pick and place" objects into the assembly and leads to the company calling the IR3, "the world's first product assembling 3D printer."

However, there are several caveats to this ability – the part must fit into a special bin on the machine, it must have a steel plate that the electromagnet on the print head can grab onto, and it must have special spring loaded connections that mate to the printed conductive material in the plastic assembly the rest of the printer is making.

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Loading cancer vaccines into silicon microparticles could stop tumors in their tracks

Loading cancer vaccines into silicon microparticles could stop tumors in their tracks | interesting | Scoop.it
New research now suggests a vaccine for breast cancer might not be all that far away, with the discovery that loading cancer antigens into silicon microparticles serves to greatly boost the body's immune response.

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3D reconstruction of neuronal networks uncovers hidden organizational principles of sensory cortex | KurzweilAI

3D reconstruction of neuronal networks uncovers hidden organizational principles of sensory cortex | KurzweilAI | interesting | Scoop.it
An international research team has reconstructed anatomically realistic 3D models of cortical columns of the rat brain, providing unprecedented insight into how neurons in the elementary functional units of the sensory cortex called cortical columns are interconnected.

The models suggest that cortical circuitry interconnects most neurons across cortical columns, rather than within and that these “trans-columnar” networks are not uniformly structured: they are highly specialized and integrate signals from multiple sensory receptors.

For example, rodents are nocturnal animals that use facial whiskers as their primary sensory receptors to orient themselves in their environment. For example, to determine the position, size and texture of objects, they rhythmically move the whiskers back and forth, thereby exploring and touching objects within their immediate surroundings. Such tactile sensory information is then relayed from the periphery to the sensory cortex via whisker-specific neuronal pathways, where each individual whisker activates neurons located within a dedicated cortical column. The one-to-one correspondence between a facial whisker and a cortical column renders the rodent vibrissal system as an ideal model to investigate the structural and functional organization of cortical columns.

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How 'digital natives' are killing the 'sage on the stage'

How 'digital natives' are killing the 'sage on the stage' | interesting | Scoop.it
The idea that teachers should teach and students should listen presumes that teachers know more than their students.

While this was generally true back when textbooks were a rarity, and may have been partly true since the invention of the public library, it is most likely untrue for at least many students in this era of the “active learner” (AKA “digital natives”).

After all, with a smartphone in every student’s pocket and Google only a tap away, how can the humble sage expect to compete as the font of all online knowledge?

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It’s Not a ‘Stream’ of Consciousness-We actually perceive the world in rhythmic pulses rather than as a continuous flow.

It’s Not a ‘Stream’ of Consciousness-We actually perceive the world in rhythmic pulses rather than as a continuous flow. | interesting | Scoop.it
IN 1890, the American psychologist William James famously likened our conscious experience to the flow of a stream. “A ‘river’ or a ‘stream’ are the metaphors by which it is most naturally described,” he wrote. “In talking of it hereafter, let’s call it the stream of thought, consciousness, or subjective life.”

While there is no disputing the aptness of this metaphor in capturing our subjective experience of the world, recent research has shown that the “stream” of consciousness is, in fact, an illusion. We actually perceive the world in rhythmic pulses rather than as a continuous flow.

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YouTube unterstützt ab sofort 360° Videos - Futter für Virtual-Reality-Brillen - WinFuture

YouTube unterstützt ab sofort 360° Videos - Futter für Virtual-Reality-Brillen - WinFuture | interesting | Scoop.it
YouTube schaltet eine weitere interessante Option für den Videoupload frei. Ab sofort kann die beliebte Videoplattform auch mit Aufnahmen umgehen,
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Team finds 'exploding head syndrome' more common in young people than thought

Team finds 'exploding head syndrome' more common in young people than thought | interesting | Scoop.it
Washington State University researchers have found that an unexpectedly high percentage of young people experience "exploding head syndrome," a psychological phenomenon in which they are awakened by abrupt loud noises, even the sensation of an explosion in their head. Brian Sharpless, a Washington State University assistant professor and director of the university psychology clinic, found that nearly one in five—18 percent—of college students interviewed said they had experienced it at least once. It was so bad for some that it significantly impacted their lives, he said."Unfortunately for this minority of individuals, no well-articulated or empirically supported treatments are available, and very few clinicians or researchers assess for it," he said.

The study also found that more than one-third of those who had exploding head syndrome also experienced isolated sleep paralysis, a frightening experience in which one cannot move or speak when waking up. People with this condition will literally dream with their eyes wide open.The study is the largest of its kind, with 211 undergraduate students interviewed by psychologists or graduate students trained in recognizing the symptoms of exploding head syndrome and isolated sleep paralysis. The results appear online in the Journal of Sleep Research.Based on smaller, less rigorous studies, some researchers have hypothesized that exploding head syndrome is a rare condition found mostly in people older than 50.

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Geographic tongue: the mysterious condition that makes maps in your mouth

Geographic tongue: the mysterious condition that makes maps in your mouth | interesting | Scoop.it
Geographic tongue (GT) is a medical condition in which the upper layer of the tongue, which consists of tiny hair-like protrusions (called papillae), is damaged due to an expanding inflammation. As a result, red patches devoid of papillae can be observed on the surface of the tongue. A noticeable characteristic of the condition is an evolving map-like appearance of the affected tongue (hence its name).

GT, which is harmless and affects about 2% of the population, was first reported more than 180 years ago. It has been investigated ever since, but the actual cause of the condition remains unknown. GT has been associated with different diseases such as psoriasis.
Maps and maths

In a recent investigation, published in New Journal of Physics, we treated GT as a dynamical system – a mathematical description that enables one to examine how something evolves over time – that consists of a large number of coupled (interacting) elements such as the hair protrusions. Each of these elements can be found in one of three states: a healed (unaffected) state, an excited state and a recovering state. Once an element is excited, it then goes through a remission period in which it cannot be excited.

Other well-known natural phenomena that can be treated in this manner include the heart muscle (where the cardiac cells are the coupled elements) and forest fires (where the trees are the elements) – once a fire has started, it then moves to fresh areas until it has burned everywhere that it can. The forest then enters a long recovering period and eventually completely recovers. Systems that can be described in this way fall in the category of “excitable media”.

A similar process also happens with GT. But as it is a chronic condition, it will reoccur at a later time. By identifying GT as a novel example of excitable media dynamics, we were able to examine and visualise the evolution of the condition using numerical simulations.

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Internet of things devices meant to simplify our lives may end up ruling them instead

Internet of things devices meant to simplify our lives may end up ruling them instead | interesting | Scoop.it
Technology’s promise of wonderful things in the future stretches from science fiction to science fact: self-driving cars, virtual reality, smart devices such as Google Glass, and the internet of things are designed to make our lives easier and more productive. Certainly inventions of the past century such as the washing machine and combustion engine have brought leisure time to the masses. But will this trend necessarily continue?

On the surface, tech that simplifies hectic modern lives seems a good idea. But we risk spending more of the time freed by these devices designed to free up our time through the growing need to micromanage them. Recall that an early digital technology designed to help us was the continually interrupting Microsoft Office paperclip.

It’s possible that internet-connected domestic devices could turn out to be ill-judged, poorly-designed, short-lived technological fads. But the present trend of devices that require relentless updates and patches driven by security threats and privacy breaches doesn’t make for a utopian-sounding future. Technology growth in the workplace can lead to loss of productivity; taken to the home it could take a bite out of leisure time too.

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‘Spin-orbitronics’ could ‘revolutionize the electronics industry’ by manipulating magnetic domains | KurzweilAI

‘Spin-orbitronics’ could ‘revolutionize the electronics industry’ by manipulating magnetic domains | KurzweilAI | interesting | Scoop.it
Researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)’s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) have found a new way of manipulating the walls that define magnetic domains (uniform areas in magnetic materials) and the results could one day revolutionize the electronics industry, they say.

Gong Chen and Andreas Schmid, experts in electron microscopy with Berkeley Lab’s Materials Sciences Division, led the discovery of a technique by which the “spin textures” of magnetic domain walls in ultrathin magnets can be switched between left-handed, right-handed, cycloidal, helical and mixed structures.

Electronic memory and logic

The “handedness” or “chirality” of spin texture determines the movement of a magnetic domain wall in response to an electric current, so this technique, which involves the strategic application of uniaxial strain, should lend itself to the creation of domains walls designed for desired electronic memory and logic functions.

“The information sloshing around today’s Internet is essentially a cacophony of magnetic domain walls being pushed around within the magnetic films of memory devices,” says Schmid. “Writing and reading information today involves mechanical processes that limit reliability and speed. Our findings pave the way to use the spin-orbit forces that act upon electrons in a current to propel magnetic domain walls either in the same direction as the current, or in the opposite direction, or even sideways, opening up a rich new smorgasbord of possibilities in the field of spin-orbitronics.”

The study was carried out at at the National Center for Electron Microscopy (NCEM), which is part of the Molecular Foundry, a DOE Office of Science User Facility. The results have been reported in a Nature Communications paper titled “Unlocking Bloch-type chirality in ultrathin magnets through uniaxial strain.” Chen and Schmid are the corresponding authors. Other co-authors are Alpha N’Diaye, Sang Pyo Kang, Hee Young Kwon, Changyeon Won, Yizheng Wu and Z.Q. Qiu.

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Cow Milk Without the Cow Is Coming to Change Food Forever | WIRED

Cow Milk Without the Cow Is Coming to Change Food Forever | WIRED | interesting | Scoop.it
Counter Culture Labs takes its name pretty literally. It is a bio lab, for sure, complete with pipettes, carboys, microscopes, and flasks. But it is decidedly counter to the traditional culture of laboratory science. The DIY tinkerers who hang out here—in the back of a sprawling space that used to house a heavy metal club in Oakland, California—are working beyond conventional notions of inquiry and research. Their goal is nothing less than to hack nature.

Consider one group of bio-hackers who meet in the lab each Monday night to work on a project that sounds like a contradiction in terms: They’re trying to make cow’s milk cheese without the cow. Using mail-order DNA, they’re tricking yeast cells into producing a substance that’s molecularly identical to milk. And if successful, they’ll turn this milk into cheese. Real cheese. But vegan cheese. Real vegan cheese.
That’s the name of the project: Real Vegan Cheese. These hackers want cheese that tastes like the real thing, but they don’t want it coming from an animal. Abandoning real cheese is one of the hardest sacrifices vegans must make, says one member of the group, Benjamin Rupert, a chemist by training and a vegan for the past decade. With Real Vegan Cheese, they won’t have to. “What we’re making is identical to the animal protein,” he says. “You’re not giving anything up, really.”

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Do Killer Robots Violate Human Rights?

Do Killer Robots Violate Human Rights? | interesting | Scoop.it
As bizarre as it sounds, the United Nations just held an arms-control conference to figure out if killer robots might violate the laws of war.

Ten years ago, very few experts were worried about military robots. The technology was just emerging onto the battlefield. Now, several credible groups are waging war against killer robots, officially known as lethal autonomous weapons systems.

The UN returned to the subject last week in a five-day meeting of experts for the Convention for Certain Conventional Weapons. I was invited by the convention’s chairperson, the German Ambassador Michael Biontino, to speak about the problems that lethal autonomous weapons systems may create for human rights. This essay is adapted from my testimony and gives a glimpse at how this important debate is moving along. (These are my opinions alone and don't necessarily reflect the positions of UNIDIR or other organizations.)

The specific issue I was asked to address is whether killer robots, in making kill-decisions without human intervention, violate either a right to life or the "laws of humanity," as protected by the Martens Clause that has been in effect since the 1899 Hague Convention. (The Martens Clause requires nations to consider warfare through the lens of the “public conscience.”)

These concerns are a different kind than technology-based objections to killer robots. For instance, critics point out that artificial intelligence still can’t reliably distinguish between a lawful target (such as an enemy combatant with a gun) and an unlawful one (such as a civilian with an ice-cream cone), as demanded by the laws of war. Technology limitations, like this one and others, are possibly solvable over time. But if lethal autonomous weapons are truly an assault on human rights, that’s a philosophical challenge that can’t just be solved with better science and engineering. So it’s worth focusing on human rights as some of the most persistent problems for the killer robots, and I’ll keep that separate from technical issues to not confuse an already-complex debate.

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Microsoft Shows HoloLens' Augmented Reality Is No Gimmick | WIRED

Microsoft Shows HoloLens' Augmented Reality Is No Gimmick | WIRED | interesting | Scoop.it
Today, Microsoft demonstrated how far its augmented-reality HoloLens wonderland project has come. In fact, it cemented HoloLens’s place as one of the most exciting new technologies we have—just in ways that you may never actually see.

When HoloLens debuted in January, the use cases Microsoft proffered were largely domestic; you could build (Microsoft-owned) Minecraft worlds in your living room, or have conversations over (Microsoft-owned) Skype with far-flung friends who felt a few feet away. Even WIRED’s behind-the-scenes look back then mostly comprised games and other low-stakes living room interactions. While a broad range of industries and institutions have use for augmented reality, Microsoft spent the bulk of its HoloLens introduction emphasizing the device’s consumer potential.

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Computers That Know How You Feel Will Soon Be Everywhere | WIRED

Computers That Know How You Feel Will Soon Be Everywhere | WIRED | interesting | Scoop.it
Sometime next summer, you’ll be able to watch a horror series that is exactly as scary as you want it to be—no more, no less. You’ll pull up the show, which relies on software from the artificial intelligence startup Affectiva, and tap a button to opt in. Then, while you stare at your iPad, its camera will stare at you.

The software will read your emotional reactions to the show in real time. Should your mouth turn down a second too long or your eyes squeeze shut in fright, the plot will speed along. But if they grow large and hold your interest, the program will draw out the suspense. “Yes, the killing is going to happen, but whether you want to be kept in the tension depends on you,” says Julian McCrea, founder of the London-based studio Portal Entertainment, which has a development deal with a large unidentified entertainment network to produce the series. He calls Affectiva’s face-reading software, Affdex, “an incredible piece of technology.”

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Meet the people out to stop humanity from destroying itself

Meet the people out to stop humanity from destroying itself | interesting | Scoop.it
“We attract weird people,” Andrew Snyder-Beattie said. “I get crazy emails in my inbox all the time.” What kinds of people? “People who have their own theories of physics.”Snyder-Beattie is the project manager at the Future of Humanity Institute. Headed up by Nick Bostrom, the Swedish philosopher famous for popularizing the risks of artificial intelligence, the FHI is part of the Oxford Martin School, created when a computer billionaire gave the largest donation in Oxford University’s 900-year history to set up a place to solve some of the world’s biggest problems. One of Bostrom’s research papers (pdf, p. 26) noted that more academic research has been done on dung beetles and Star Trek than on human extinction. The FHI is trying to change that.

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Palm 'holds secrets of future health' - BBC News

Palm 'holds secrets of future health' - BBC News | interesting | Scoop.it
The chances of having a heart attack, stroke or dying young may be hidden in the palm of the hand, a study suggests.

A trial on nearly 140,000 people in 14 countries, published in the Lancet, suggests grip strength is better than blood pressure at predicting risk.

The international research team said it would be a "simple, inexpensive" tool for doctors.

Experts argued the link between grip and the heart was unclear and needed more study.

The maximum crushing force you can exert in your grip naturally declines with age.

But those whose grip strength declines fastest may be at greater risk of health problems, the study suggests.

Women in their mid-20s have a grip strength about 75lb (34kg), which falls to 53lb in a 70-year-old.
The equivalent figures for men are 119lb (54kg) falling to 84lb.

The huge trial, in 14 countries, showed each 11lb (5kg) reduction in grip strength increased the odds of an early death by 16%.

The odds of a fatal heart problem increased by 17% and a stroke by 9%.

Doctors currently calculate the chances of a heart attack or stroke by filling out a questionnaire with the patient by assessing age, whether they smoke, obesity, cholesterol levels, blood pressure where they live and family history.

The researchers argue grip strength makes more accurate predictions than blood pressure alone and could be a new tool for assessing risk.

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Ringing ears light up the brain's emotion center - Futurity

Ringing ears light up the brain's emotion center - Futurity | interesting | Scoop.it
People with tinnitus “hear” ringing, buzzing, or hissing in their ears much like an amputee might “feel” pain in a missing limb. While exposure to loud noise may contribute, some cases have no apparent trigger.

Though it’s not known yet exactly where and how tinnitus occurs in the brain, says Richard Salvi, director of the Center for Hearing and Deafness at the University at Buffalo, functional MRI studies with rats show the abnormal activity underlying tinnitus and a related condition called hyperacusis isn’t confined to a specific brain location, but actually involves a neural network.

Salvi and colleagues induced tinnitus in rats by administering the active ingredient in aspirin, which has long been known to produce tinnitus and hyperacusis symptoms in humans.

“Certain brain regions become very active once tinnitus is induced, much more so than it is for an animal with normal hearing,” says Salvi, one of the authors of the study published in the journal eLife. “Even though high-dose aspirin induces a hearing loss and less information is being sent from the ear to the brain as a result, the brain responds with greater activity.
“It’s paradoxical, like a car getting better gas mileage with a less efficient engine.”

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