Intelligent Systems
18 views | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Jasmine Berry from Brain Tricks: Belief, Bias, and Blindspots
Scoop.it!

Having Power Diminishes Your Empathy For Others

Having Power Diminishes Your Empathy For Others | Intelligent Systems | Scoop.it

New research shows that increased power in an organization diminishes capacity for empathy.

 

Several research studies have shown that increasing power in an organization (or in any kind of relationship) tends to diminish capacity for empathy, compassion, and seeing another person’s perspective. This is especially damaging to effective leadership of people subordinate to those in power. Studies have shown that increased power diminishes activity of your “mirror neurons,” which provide the sense of connection with another person’s experience, and fuels empathy. Here’s the latest study that sheds more light on what happens. It shows the need for helping leaders develop and strengthen their capacity to connect with others’ reality and experience, which helps counter the tendency towards self-absorption in one’s own perspective, when one is in a higher-power status. 

 

Douglas LaBier, Ph.D.


Via Edwin Rutsch, Jocelyn Stoller
more...
Rescooped by Jasmine Berry from Empathy and Animals
Scoop.it!

Chimps catch people’s yawns in sign of flexible empathy | Science News

Chimps catch people’s yawns in sign of flexible empathy | Science News | Intelligent Systems | Scoop.it
Chimpanzees may show humanlike empathy, as evidenced by their contagious yawning.

 

Chimpanzees possess a flexible, humanlike sensitivity to the mental states of others, even strangers from another species, researchers suggest March 11 in the Proceedings of the Royal Society B. Empathy’s roots go back at least to the common ancestor of humans and chimps, they say.


========================

Having socially connected with

facility workers, chimps reacted empathically

to human strangers who yawned,

the researchers propose.

==============


BY BRUCE BOWER 


Via Edwin Rutsch
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jasmine Berry
Scoop.it!

The Science of Turning Instagram Followers into Customers - The Wishpond Blog

The Science of Turning Instagram Followers into Customers - The Wishpond Blog | Intelligent Systems | Scoop.it
The Science of Turning Instagram Followers into Customers Are you struggling to increase your Instagram ROI? Are you concerned the platform just isn’t for your business and thinking about throwing in...
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jasmine Berry from Ethics of Empathy
Scoop.it!

A State of grace - paranoidfreud: TED Talk about Mirror Neurons and...

paranoidfreud: “ TED Talk about Mirror Neurons and how they shaped civilization by VS Ramachandran ” (Video: paranoidfreud: http://tumblr.com/xpm32sh9pi...)...


Via Luísa Semedo
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Jasmine Berry from Empathy and Animals
Scoop.it!

Do “Mirror Neurons” Help Create Social Understanding?

Do “Mirror Neurons” Help Create Social Understanding? | Intelligent Systems | Scoop.it

Is the mirror system key to how social understanding is created in the brain?

 

Researchers from Denmark released a new study on Feb. 24 showing that specific brain cells called “mirror neurons” may help people interpret the actions they see other people perform.


========================

Mirror neurons are thought to be

specialized brain cells that allow

you to learn and empathize by

observing the actions

of another person.

========

 

The new study from Aarhus University and the University of Copenhagen will be published in an upcoming issue of Psychological Science. The research was led by postdoctoral research fellow John Michael.

 

by Christopher Bergland


Via Edwin Rutsch
more...
Eli Levine's curator insight, February 25, 2014 9:45 AM

It would make intuitive sense.  If you cannot somehow connect to the other, how can you have a relationship, let alone, a positive one where there is understanding?

 

Could be an interesting technique to boost empathy and relate to people from other cultures and backgrounds.  If these neurons can be built up or analyzed in real time, it might be a valuable tool for briding gaps between people from different cultural backgrounds (or, at least, weeding out those who really shouldn't be interacting with people from different backgrounds in the first place).

 

I wonder if rats and other non-primate social animals have these mirror neurons as well.

 

I think it's good to focus on confirming these results and to determine whether mirror neurons are distinctly a neuron class onto their own or are simply neurons that fulfil multiple roles.  This last question, especially, would answer a lot of questions about how the brain works in one fell swoop, showing whether or not there are specific types of neurons in the brain, or whether each neuron can fulfil multiple roles, even in this highly specialized form.