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How a space robot will 'slow dance' with an asteroid, thanks to Canada - The Globe and Mail

How a space robot will 'slow dance' with an asteroid, thanks to Canada - The Globe and Mail | Life the Universe and Everything. | Scoop.it
How a space robot will 'slow dance' with an asteroid, thanks to Canada The Globe and Mail The involvement is ongoing, but on Thursday the Canadian Space Agency announced a $7-million contract for MDA Corporation to build an altimeter that will fly...
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♥ princess leia ♥'s curator insight, January 25, 2015 2:39 PM

Slow dancing with an asteroid... I cannot say I've ever done that

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Inside the 'iWatch': The technology Apple is looking at for your Wrist

Inside the 'iWatch': The technology Apple is looking at for your Wrist | Life the Universe and Everything. | Scoop.it
Apple Insider
Inside the 'iWatch': The technology Apple is looking at for your wrist
Apple Insider
Apple's anticipated entry to the wearable devices market has taken on near-mythical status, with rumors reaching every corner of the technology map.

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♥ princess leia ♥'s curator insight, January 25, 2015 2:40 PM

The future is waiting for us

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Added drug allows rapamycin to slow aging without risking to induce diabetes

Added drug allows rapamycin to slow aging without risking to induce diabetes | Life the Universe and Everything. | Scoop.it

New research at the Linus Pauling Institute at Oregon State University suggests a fix for serious side effects of rapamycin(*), a drug that appears to mimic the ability of dietary restriction to slow the aging process.


Laboratory mice that have received rapamycin have reduced the age-dependent decline in spontaneous activity, demonstrated more fitness, improved cognition and cardiovascular health, had less cancer, and lived substantially longer than mice fed a normal diet.


However, rapamycin has some drawbacks, including an increase in insulin resistance that could set the stage for diabetes, observed in both humans and laboratory animals. The new findings, published in the Journals of Gerontology: Biological Sciences, help to explain why that happens, and what could be done to address it.


The new research study found that both dietary restriction and rapamycin inhibited lipid synthesis, but only dietary restriction increased the oxidation of those lipids in order to produce energy. Rapamycin, by contrast, allowed a buildup of fatty acids and eventually an increase in insulin resistance, which in humans can lead to diabetes.


However, the drug metformin can address that concern, and is already given to some diabetic patients to increase lipid oxidation. In lab tests, the combined use of rapamycin and metformin prevented the unwanted side effect.


“If proven true, then combined use of metformin and rapamycin for treating aging and age-associated diseases in humans may be possible,” the researchers wrote in their conclusion.


“This could be an important advance if it helps us find a way to gain the apparent benefits of rapamycin without increasing insulin resistance,” said Viviana Perez, an assistant professor in the Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics in the OSU College of Science.


“It could provide a way not only to increase lifespan but to address some age-related diseases and improve general health,” Perez said. “We might find a way for people not only to live longer, but to live better and with a higher quality of life.”


“There’s still substantial work to do, and it may not be realistic to expect with humans what we have been able to accomplish with laboratory animals,” Perez said. “People don’t live in a cage and eat only the exact diet they are given. Nonetheless, the potential of this work is exciting.”


(*) Rapamycin, first discovered from the soils of Easter Island, or Rapa Nui in the South Pacific Ocean, is primarily used as an immunosuppressant to prevent rejection of organs and tissues. In recent years it was also observed that it can function as a metabolic “signaler” that inhibits a biological pathway found in almost all higher life forms — the ability to sense when food has been eaten, energy is available and it’s okay for cell proliferation, protein synthesis and growth to proceed. Called mTOR in mammals, for the term “mammalian target of rapamycin,” this pathway has a critical evolutionary value — it helps an organism avoid too much cellular expansion and growth when energy supplies are insufficient. That helps explain why some form of the pathway has been conserved across such a multitude of species, from yeast to fish to humans.


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Musk, Zuckerberg, Kutcher invest in AI firm Vicarious

Musk, Zuckerberg, Kutcher invest in AI firm Vicarious | Life the Universe and Everything. | Scoop.it
The three are joining in on a $40 million round that will help Vicarious toward its ambitious goal: translating the brain's neocortex into code. Read this article by Don Reisinger on CNET News.

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The future of brainwave-enhanced media | SharpBrains

The future of brainwave-enhanced media | SharpBrains | Life the Universe and Everything. | Scoop.it
Perils and pleasures of mood-sensing technology (New Scientist): "What happens when we link films and music to devices that capture small changes in our

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Be employable, study philosophy

Be employable, study philosophy | Life the Universe and Everything. | Scoop.it
The discipline teaches you how to think clearly, a gift that can be applied to just about any line of work

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Philosophy of Cosmology

Philosophy of cosmology, philosophy of physics, philosophy of science, metaphysics, philosophy of mathematics, University of Oxford.

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Philosophy of cosmology is an expanding discipline, directed to the conceptual foundations of cosmology and the philosophical contemplation of the universe
as a totality. It draws on the fundamental theories of physics — thermodynamics, statistical mechanics, quantum mechanics, quantum field theory, and special and general relativity — and on several branches of philosophy -- philosophy of physics, philosophy of science, metaphysics, philosophy of mathematics, and epistemology.

 

Central questions concern limits to explanation, physical infinity, laws, especially laws, if any, of initial conditions, selection effects and the anthropic principle, objective probability, the nature of space, time, and spacetime, the arrow of time,
the measurement problem of quantum mechanics, dark energy and quantum fluctuations, scale, the origins of structure formation, the origins and fate of the universe, and the place of life and intelligence within it.


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Margarida Sá Costa's curator insight, March 12, 2014 7:28 AM

would love to know more about!  and you? what do you think about the unknown?

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▶ "Design of a Superconducting Quantum Computer" - Talk by John Martinis

Superconducting quantum computing is now at an important crossroad, where "proof of concept" experiments involving small numbers of qubits can be transitioned to more challenging and systematic approaches that could actually lead to building a quantum computer. Our optimism is based on two recent developments: a new hardware architecture for error detection based on "surface codes" [1], and recent improvements in the coherence of superconducting qubits [2]. I will explain how the surface code is a major advance for quantum computing, as it allows one to use qubits with realistic fidelities, and has a connection architecture that is compatible with integrated circuit technology. Additionally, the surface code allows quantum error detection to be understood using simple principles. I will also discuss how the hardware characteristics of superconducting qubits map into this architecture, and review recent results that suggest gate errors can be reduced to below that needed for the error detection threshold. 

References 

[1] Austin G. Fowler, Matteo Mariantoni, John M. Martinis and Andrew N. Cleland, PRA 86, 032324 (2012). 
[2] R. Barends, J. Kelly, A. Megrant, D. Sank, E. Jeffrey, Y. Chen, Y. Yin, B. Chiaro, J. Mutus, C. Neill, P. O'Malley, P. Roushan, J. Wenner, T. C. White, A. N. Cleland and John M. Martinis, arXiv:1304:2322.


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Perfect memory, enhanced vision, an expert golf swing: The future of brain implants

Perfect memory, enhanced vision, an expert golf swing: The future of brain implants | Life the Universe and Everything. | Scoop.it
How soon can we expect to see brain implants for perfect memory, enhanced vision, hypernormal focus or an expert golf swing? We're closer than you might think.

 

What would you give for a retinal chip that let you see in the dark or for a next-generation cochlear implant that let you hear any conversation in a noisy restaurant, no matter how loud? Or for a memory chip, wired directly into your brain's hippocampus, that gave you perfect recall of everything you read? Or for an implanted interface with the Internet that automatically translated a clearly articulated silent thought ("the French sun king") into an online search that digested the relevant Wikipedia page and projected a summary directly into your brain?

 

Science fiction? Perhaps not for very much longer. Brain implants today are where laser eye surgery was several decades ago. They are not risk-free and make sense only for a narrowly defined set of patients—but they are a sign of things to come.

 

Unlike pacemakers, dental crowns or implantable insulin pumps, neuroprosthetics—devices that restore or supplement the mind's capacities with electronics inserted directly into the nervous system—change how we perceive the world and move through it. For better or worse, these devices become part of who we are.

 

Neuroprosthetics aren't new. They have been around commercially for three decades, in the form of the cochlear implants used in the ears (the outer reaches of the nervous system) of more than 300,000 hearing-impaired people around the world. Last year, the Food and Drug Administration approved the first retinal implant, made by the company Second Sight.

Both technologies exploit the same principle: An external device, either a microphone or a video camera, captures sounds or images and processes them, using the results to drive a set of electrodes that stimulate either the auditory or the optic nerve, approximating the naturally occurring output from the ear or the eye.


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Laura E. Mirian, PhD's curator insight, March 22, 2014 11:00 AM

Is this really necessary when we live only 100 years or less?

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3D Augmented-Reality Makeup Mirror Could Transform Beauty Shopping

3D Augmented-Reality Makeup Mirror Could Transform Beauty Shopping | Life the Universe and Everything. | Scoop.it
A new 3D augmented-reality makeup mirror aims to make color testing much easier.

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Video Augmentations with The Wikitude SDK

The Wikitude SDK now includes the ability to playback video through image recognition triggers. This advanced technology allows you to make your magazines, m...

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Juhani Pihkala's curator insight, January 31, 2014 1:19 AM

Just like Aurasma? Must try...

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Edible QR Codes: What's The Deal? - QR Code Press

Edible QR Codes: What's The Deal? - QR Code Press | Life the Universe and Everything. | Scoop.it
QR codes has gotten to be so significant that the codes are branching out and being implemented in other industries, many of which haven’t had much use for

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Can't Afford Google Glass? Epson Has the Specs for You | Gadget Lab | Wired.com

Can't Afford Google Glass? Epson Has the Specs for You | Gadget Lab | Wired.com | Life the Universe and Everything. | Scoop.it
Epson's Moverio BT-200 glasses are bulkier than Google Glass, but they can do a lot more.

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On the Internet of Things, your body is the next thing to be networked

On the Internet of Things, your body is the next thing to be networked | Life the Universe and Everything. | Scoop.it
Hotels that recognize visitors. Shops that say welcome back. Welcome to a new digital world that knows who you are—and what you want.

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Scientists Unearth A BIG Dinosaur Discovery

Scientists Unearth A BIG Dinosaur Discovery | Life the Universe and Everything. | Scoop.it
Move over, T. rex. And take a seat, Argentinosaurus. Scientists have unearthed a newfound prehistoric giant that just may be the "world's largest dinosaur" yet discovered. Wow.

Researchers from the Museo Paleontologico Egidio Feruglio in...

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♥ princess leia ♥'s curator insight, January 25, 2015 2:41 PM

WOW ..they found a new big dinosaur

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"Thermal Touch" can turn any surface into an augmented reality 3D touchscreen

"Thermal Touch" can turn any surface into an augmented reality 3D touchscreen | Life the Universe and Everything. | Scoop.it

Augmented reality company Metaio is developing "Thermal Touch," a technology that combines infrared and visible light cameras to detect the heat signature from your fingers and turn any object into a touchscreen. The technology could be embedded in the smartphones and wearable devices of the future to offer new ways of interacting with our environment.


Metaio, an augmented reality company based in Munich, believes that thermal imaging cameras will be a staple in the personal electronics of the future, and has developed the prototype of a user interface that relies on them to turn any object into a heat-sensitive touchscreen.


Consisting of an infrared and standard camera working in tandem and running on a tablet PC, the prototype registers the heat signature left by a person’s finger when touching a surface. Metaio’s AR software then supplements the experience with AR and computer vision to allow the user to interact with digital content in all-new tactile way.


The best graphic user interface (GUI) for wearable headsets has yet to be determined – device makers have so far experimented with voice navigation, companion devices and even projection, but in order for consumers to adopt new technology on a massive level it needs to be convenient and, above all, accessible in countless scenarios.


With “Thermal Touch”, a wearable headset user could turn any surface into a touch-screen: Imagine pushing directions to your device simply by touching a static map in a shopping mall, building complex or airport; children could bring play to new levels and launch digital content directly from their toys; design professionals could visualize their digital and 3-D creations on their real world counterparts; and service technicians could pull up information just by touching an object in real life.


“Thermal Touch” is a prototype and far from everyday usability. Metaio released the demo to educate the community on the possibilities of computer vision. It is likely that in 5-10 years infrared cameras may join a multitude of advanced sensors being integrated into devices everyday, including the wearable augmented reality headsets of the near future.

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Why No One Trusts Facebook To Power The Future

Why No One Trusts Facebook To Power The Future | Life the Universe and Everything. | Scoop.it
In the coming years, one billion more people will gain access to the Internet thanks to drones and satellites hovering in the stratosphere.

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Groundbreaking new laser technology could be used to control lightning - Digital Trends

Groundbreaking new laser technology could be used to control lightning - Digital Trends | Life the Universe and Everything. | Scoop.it
Digital Trends Groundbreaking new laser technology could be used to control lightning Digital Trends Optical scientists at the University of Arizona and University of Central Florida have developed a new type of laser technology capable of sending...
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Samsung’s Galaxy S5 is the first smartphone that can use a fingerprint to authorize payments in stores and online

Samsung’s Galaxy S5 is the first smartphone that can use a fingerprint to authorize payments in stores and online | Life the Universe and Everything. | Scoop.it

Anyone with an iPhone 5 can use its fingerprint reader to unlock the device and pay for apps or music in Apple’s iTunes store. Owners of Samsung’s latest flagship device, the Galaxy S5 smartphone, which launches on April 11, will be able to make much broader use of their fingerprints to pay for things. If they visit a website or app that accepts PayPal using the device, they can authorize payments by swiping a finger across the phone’s home button. And PayPal’s own mobile app can be used to pay for goods in some physical stores in the U.S.

 

Fingerprint payments are likely to be offered on many more smartphones in the near future. The Galaxy S5’s payments system is the first commercial deployment of a new protocol developed by the FIDO Alliance, a group founded by tech companies to end our reliance on insecure passwords (see “PayPal, Lenovo Launch Campaign to Kill the Password”). Indeed, fingerprint readers are expected to become commonplace on mobile devices over the next year or so (see “A Technological Assault on the Password”).

 

“Today people are having to type in nine-digit passwords everywhere, including one-handed on the subway,” says Joel Yarbrough, senior director of global product solutions at PayPal. This leads many people to use simple passwords and to reuse them across multiple services. This, in turn, makes it easier for criminals to take control of accounts. “Building a smart biometric experience solves both usability and dramatically increases the security level,” says Yarbrough.

 
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BBC NEWS | Science/Nature | Diamond star thrills astronomers

BBC NEWS | Science/Nature | Diamond star thrills astronomers | Life the Universe and Everything. | Scoop.it

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Recreation of Species: How far back can we go?

Recreation of Species: How far back can we go? | Life the Universe and Everything. | Scoop.it

The lesson of the Jurassic Park tragedy was clear — man and dinosaur were not meant to coexist. It’s lucky then that dinosaur fossils are far too old to contain any genetic material that could be used for cloning. DNA breaks down over time, even when kept in ideal conditions, and a study of extinct moa bones has revealed an estimate of the half-life for our genes.


It might be odd to think of DNA having a half-life, as it’s usually associated with radioactive material — but as it measures the time taken for half of something to decay, it makes sense to talk about old samples of DNA in the same way. For example, uranium-235, the fissile material that can be used in nuclear power plants (and nuclear weapons), has a half-life of 703.8 million years. DNA, by comparison, doesn’t fare so well — according to a study of 158 samples of moa bones between 500 and 6,000 years old, DNA appears to have a half-life of around 521 years.


A study in the Proceedings of the Royal Society B saw palaeogeneticists from the universities of Perth and Copenhagen drilling into the bones of 158 different moa, the largest of the flightless birds which used to dominated New Zealand’s odd and unique ecosystem before the arrival of humans. The bones had all been collected from within a five kilometre radius, and they were estimated to have been buried at an average temperature of 13 degrees Celsius since the birds died. Their similar preservation conditions were key to ensuring that a reliable figure for the DNA decomposition could be found.


Averaging out the results from the different bones gave the average half-life of 521 years. That result is caveated, of course, as there are many factors that can also affect the rate of decay — soil acidity, bone health, extreme temperature, humidity, and so on. However, it does provide a baseline against which to assess the viability of obtaining DNA samples from future finds.


If there is a lot of DNA, preserved in absolutely ideal conditions, then it might hang around for several thousand years. Samples of Neanderthal DNA have been found in ancient teeth as old as 100,000 years old, and New Scientist reports that there have also been tiny fragments of DNA from insects and plants hundreds of thousands of years old found in ice cores, but these are too decayed to be used for cloning.


The moa could theoretically be cloned, if a good enough DNA sample is found. The moa is generally thought to have been hunted to extinction by the Maori residents of New Zealand before the arrival of European settlers in the 1700s, which isn’t too long enough by DNA standards. Or, a better candidate might be the woolly mammoth — intact specimens have been found frozen into the permafrost (including very recently by a boy out walking his dog), and it is thought that it will eventually be possible to implant a mammoth embryo into an elephant’s uterus, which will grow into a full-on baby mammoth. We may even be able to reintroduce them into the wild, which is really the least we could do after driving them to extinction in the first place.


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Augmented Reality Is Almost Everywhere | TechCrunch

Augmented Reality Is Almost Everywhere | TechCrunch | Life the Universe and Everything. | Scoop.it
There is less difference between our work and home devices, our tablets and our mobile phones. They are not meant for "work" or for the "home." We just use..

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Jed Fisher's curator insight, December 23, 2013 7:44 AM

Good end of year overview to where AR is going particular with BIM and AEC/field work. 

I'm glad to see people increasing referring to AR not as a technology but instead by it's usecase - for example, helping with in field repair/assembly support.

PS I love the structural sensor (see my previous blog post).

Mlik Sahib's curator insight, December 23, 2013 8:41 PM

"The future of augmented reality is tied to devices like the iPad. But that’s just the foundation for a next generation of apps. These apps will leverage endless stores of data that will take the form of physical objects and provide people with expert knowledge that will be immediately available. This will allow us to see the world in whole new ways and forever transform how we live and work."

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The Infinity Augmented Reality Concept Video - YouTube

Infinity Augmented Reality (Infinity AR) provides the revolutionary software platform that makes the digital eyewear experience (i.e. Meta, Google Glass) a r... (Apparently augmented reality glasses are for creepy, rich white guys.

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Augmented Reality TV System Mixes Programming and Web Content [VIDEO]

Augmented Reality TV System Mixes Programming and Web Content [VIDEO] | Life the Universe and Everything. | Scoop.it
A new venture in television out of a San Francisco-based startup combines web content with augmented TV programming to create a seamless viewing experience.

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Porsche looks to augmented reality for immersive Panamera experience

Porsche looks to augmented reality for immersive Panamera experience | Life the Universe and Everything. | Scoop.it

German automaker Porsche is equipping dealers with an augmented reality iPad application for the Porsche Panamera that immerses interested consumers in the vehicle’s capabilities.



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