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Resilience: The Other 21st Century Skills

Resilience:  The Other 21st Century Skills | Instruction | Scoop.it

"Due to the interest of my post The Other 21st Skills, I decided to individually discuss each of the skills or dispositions I proposed that are in addition to the seven survival skills as identified by Tony Wagner.

This post focuses on resiliency. The first post focused on Grit:  The Other 21st Century Skills. Some would categorize Grit and Resiliency as the same skill, but it is my belief they are involve two different, but interconnected, skill sets. While grit focuses on persistence, resilience is about bouncing back in the face of challenges and/or failure."

 


Via Beth Dichter
Kaylin Burleson's insight:

We must not forget that in order to accomplish the four Cs it takes timer and effort.   One must not be afraid to try and try again if needed to succeed. 

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Beth Dichter's curator insight, June 30, 2013 11:50 AM

Jackie Gerstein continues to discuss "the other 21st skills" addressing resilience in this post. As you read this post think about your students. Do you provide them with opportunities to grow these skills/dispositions? 

Research in this field shows that teachers make a difference. Below are a few of the points from the post.

* All individuals have the power to transform and change

* Teachers and schools have the power to transform lives

* It’s how teachers do what they do that counts

* Teachers’ beliefs in innate capacity start the change process

As you read through this post think about your classroom, your students, and ask yourself if there are new ways you might help your students build their resiliency. As always additional information as well as links to resources are available by clicking through.

Marta Braylan's curator insight, June 30, 2013 12:34 PM

Understanding the power of resilience

Ron McIntyre's curator insight, July 2, 2013 10:45 AM

Good discussion of resilience as a skill.  Often forgotten or ignored in busienss today.  it may be the key to survival.

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President Clinton Announces Commitment to Create New Pathways to College and Career Success Through Open Badges | HASTAC

President Clinton Announces Commitment to Create New Pathways to College and Career Success Through Open Badges | HASTAC | Instruction | Scoop.it

Speaking at the Clinton Global Initiative America (CGI America) meeting, an annual event of the Clinton Global Initiative that seeks innovative solutions for economic recovery, Clinton said three partners – the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, Mozilla, and HASTAC – have created the commitment to Open Badges. Outreach and technical assistance will be provided to help employers and universities across the country incorporate Open Badges in hiring, promotions, admissions, and credit over the next three years.


Via Kim Flintoff, juandoming, Jim Lerman, Dennis T OConnor
Kaylin Burleson's insight:

This is amazing!   Talk about a game changer! 

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Cath Ellis's curator insight, June 30, 2013 10:50 PM

Amazing

Mary Reilley Clark's curator insight, July 1, 2013 11:11 AM

Would this work in middle and high school?  I have so many students who would, at least initially, be motivated to work online to earn badges.  I foresee issues of authentication of work, but there is something worth exploring here.

Dixie Conner's comment, July 2, 2013 1:21 PM
Yes, this would definitely work in all levels of education. K-12 and adult.
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Placing Literature maps book scenes in the real world

Placing Literature maps book scenes in the real world | Instruction | Scoop.it

"Placing Literature maps book scenes in the real world."


Via Seth Dixon
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Yael BOUBLIL's curator insight, June 29, 2013 5:18 AM

Une piste intéressante...

MelissaRossman's curator insight, August 30, 2013 10:48 AM

wonderful

 

MelissaRossman's comment, August 30, 2013 10:48 AM
wonderful
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Choices Program Presentation

What Does Good GeographyTeaching Look Like? Answering the Big Questions in Geography.


Via Seth Dixon
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Zhanat Shanbatyrova's comment, June 28, 2013 6:11 AM
Thanks a lot for the valuable information!
Jorge Joo Nagata's curator insight, June 28, 2013 11:26 AM

Me encantó la presentación... dice tantas cosas de una disciplina tan querida (e importante) para mi y que debe tener una relevancia primordial ahora más que nunca.

Bonnie Bracey Sutton's comment, June 28, 2013 3:07 PM
It came from Seth.. take a look at his pages. Awesome things.
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5 Free Great Gardening Podcasts - Greener Ideal

5 Free Great Gardening Podcasts
Greener Ideal
Whether you're in the garden or stuck in traffic in the most stressful of urban locations, there's nothing like a free gardening podcast downloaded onto your MP3 Player to soothe the nerves.

Via Ileane Smith
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Great Web Maps


Via Seth Dixon
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Why Data Needs Stories from Economist Steven Levitt

Why Data Needs Stories from Economist Steven Levitt | Instruction | Scoop.it
Steven Levitt, an economist hailed as one of the finest minds of his generation, says he’s never been good at math and finds much of his life’s work “embarrassing.” The University of Chicago professor is not just being...

Via Dr. Karen Dietz
Kaylin Burleson's insight:

Putting data into a story makes it much more people oriented.   Brings out the need to know.    

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Dr. Karen Dietz's curator insight, June 18, 2013 8:06 PM

I really like this article because it showcases Freakonomics author Steven Levitt who is a master storyteller when it comes to data.


What I love about Levitt is his ability to take data and tell compelling stories about it -- generating not only sense-making but even better -- meaning! Meaningful stories that make an impact.


Learn more about Levitt and some of the great stories he tells interpreting data. He's a terrific example for us all. Enjoy!


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

Dr. Karen Dietz's comment, June 24, 2013 2:57 PM
Good point Kaylin!
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Atlas of True Names

Atlas of True Names | Instruction | Scoop.it

The Atlas of True Names reveals the etymological roots, or original meanings,
of the familiar terms on today's maps of the World, Europe, the British Isles and the United States.

For instance, where you would normally expect to see the Sahara indicated,
the Atlas gives you "The Tawny One", derived from Arab. es-sahra “the fawn coloured, desert”.


Via Seth Dixon
Kaylin Burleson's insight:
What a good way to get the students thinking and questioning while using this fun set of maps.
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John Blunnie's curator insight, July 2, 2013 11:12 AM

True names give these maps a unique and historic twist.

Carol Thomson's curator insight, July 17, 2013 4:57 AM

I loved looking at the map of great britain.  I hope it grabs my pupils' attention as an introduction to maps.

Amy Marques's curator insight, July 31, 2013 7:19 PM

Great to see what the original names where! Especially for those that are similar to its current name and those that are completely irrelevant!

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ePortfolio - Authentic Assessment - Project-Based Learning

ePortfolio - Authentic Assessment - Project-Based Learning | Instruction | Scoop.it
OpenSchool ePortfolio is an authentic and holistic assessment tool for project-based and lifelong learning.

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
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Adam Lenaarts's curator insight, June 21, 2013 2:59 PM

Could be worth investigating this tool for e-portefolio

Lisa Cooper's curator insight, July 16, 2013 3:33 PM

This looks like a great way for my students to find information about careers that are of interest to them.

Tamra Dollar's curator insight, July 19, 2013 5:35 PM

I also like that the ePortfolio can follow the student and allows each teacher to see prior work writing samples to get an authentic look at where the student is performing. It is a built in "needs assessment!"

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Maps of Panem - The Hunger Games

Maps of Panem - The Hunger Games | Instruction | Scoop.it
From The Hunger Games trilogy: different perspectives on the country of Panem.

Via Seth Dixon
Kaylin Burleson's insight:

Can't wait to share this with our geography teachers.    

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Gabbie J's curator insight, May 9, 2014 8:16 PM

If you have ever read the Hunger Games series , then you were probably curious on where the districts are located. These are some interpretations that other people have made to try and fulfill the Hunger Games fans needs for a conclusion . You could even see what district you would live in if you lived in Panem. 

Alyssa Dorr's curator insight, December 12, 2014 8:32 PM

I have never seen this movie, however my sister is very intelligent with every aspect of it. Panem is the country in which The Hunger Games takes place in both the book and the film. The country is separated into thirteen districts until the rebellion, reducing the number to twelve. Each district has their own job, as shown in this image. For example, one district promotes fishing, another agriculture, and also electricity. As one can see from this map, all the districts are shaped like the United States. According to my sister, Panem is classified as being the future United States. This is an interesting aspect if we think about it. One might think that from looking at this and knowing that it is going to be the "future US", that it appears that everyone will slowly drift apart and do their own thing. Everyone may end up being their own "district" in the future.  

Amber Ramirez's curator insight, October 20, 2016 2:09 PM
Ideas
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eduClipper - Save and Share

eduClipper - Save and Share | Instruction | Scoop.it
Educlipper

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
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The changing origins of U.S. immigrants

The changing origins of U.S. immigrants | Instruction | Scoop.it
Back in 1992, most legal immigrants came from Latin America and Europe. Nowadays, they tend to come from Asia and Africa.

Via Seth Dixon
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Steven Flis's curator insight, December 17, 2013 3:17 PM

From these statistics i dont think the biggest change is the latin american immigrant population but the european population. The european went from 13% to 8 % of the total make up of immigrant population. Thats a 60% decline, and that tells me that the attraction of living in America has diwendled while the EU market is on the rise. I think this is from the growing economies of the EU market and also the fact that the US has been improving in many of the leading statistics such as education, child care, and quality of life. 

Edelin Espino's curator insight, December 5, 2014 10:58 AM

Is not a surprise that illegal immigrants have been decreasing since 2007, because the economy crisis and the borders.   

Alyssa Dorr's curator insight, December 16, 2014 9:34 PM

Immigration has been an ongoing issue and the problem of border hopping doesn't make it any better. Of course numbers are going to vary from year to year. This article discusses where US immigrants come from and how the immigration changes over time. In 1992, most legal immigrants came from Latin America and Europe. Nowadays, they mostly come from Asia and Africa. Also, these statistics are only based off of legal immigrations. We cant forget the ones that just hop the border in their free time. As stated in the article, it has been estimated that there are about 11.1 million illegal immigrants in the United States. A majority of them come from Latin America and the Caribbean. With that being said, legal immigrants still make up the biggest chunk of the foreign population in the United States and the population only continues to grow.

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10 Lessons College Won't Teach You -- But Entrepreneurship Will

10 Lessons College Won't Teach You -- But Entrepreneurship Will | Instruction | Scoop.it
Think college taught you everything you need to know about the real world? Think again.

Via TechinBiz
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StoryToolz : Resources for Authors

StoryToolz : Resources for Authors | Instruction | Scoop.it

Via Nik Peachey
Kaylin Burleson's insight:

Looking great rest resources to help both teachers and students improve the writing process.    

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Nancy D. Snow's curator insight, July 24, 2013 7:55 PM

I want to try this.

Bage Shri's comment, August 6, 2013 6:43 AM
http://www.matlab-assignment-help.com/
rsplearning's comment, August 6, 2013 11:14 AM
I glanced at that matlab site. How do students use that without relying on the consultants to do their work for them?
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StoryToolz : Resources for Authors

StoryToolz : Resources for Authors | Instruction | Scoop.it

Via Nik Peachey
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Nancy D. Snow's curator insight, July 24, 2013 7:55 PM

I want to try this.

Bage Shri's comment, August 6, 2013 6:43 AM
http://www.matlab-assignment-help.com/
rsplearning's comment, August 6, 2013 11:14 AM
I glanced at that matlab site. How do students use that without relying on the consultants to do their work for them?
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Narrable

Narrable | Instruction | Scoop.it

Narrable is an online storytelling platform that combines your important photos with the voices that bring them to life. The Narrable iOS app includes a lightweight camera to capture memories as they happen and a built-in audio recorder to preserve the voices behind the memory. After you have uploaded your content, log in at narrable.com to view, edit and share your story.

 


Via Nik Peachey
Kaylin Burleson's insight:

Will let you know more once I look/use app but it sounds like something useful for all content areas. 

 

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Mita Jordan's curator insight, June 29, 2013 4:04 AM

it seems useful, shall we try

AC Norman's curator insight, August 6, 2013 6:49 PM

Ett presentationsverktyg.

BI Media Specialists's curator insight, August 19, 2013 3:07 PM

What a great way to have your students review a topic or concept in your classroom, and meet the CCGPS guidelines for publishing student work.

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Apps for Multiple Intelligences

Apps for Multiple Intelligences | Instruction | Scoop.it
Get recommended app lists, webcasts and resources selected by Apple Distinguished Educators. Our recommended apps have been tested in a variety of different grade levels, instructional strategies and classroom settings.

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
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Andrew Aker's curator insight, September 5, 2013 5:55 AM

This site is great for multiplying your multiple intelligences! 

David W. Deeds's curator insight, September 10, 2013 8:58 AM

Thanks to Ana Cristina Pratas.

Dean J. Fusto's comment, September 11, 2013 9:24 PM
Thanks for this scoop.
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10 Podcasting Projects Every Teacher Should Try

10 Podcasting Projects Every Teacher Should Try | Instruction | Scoop.it

Now that teachers have easy access to tools like Garage Band and iPods that make recording a breeze, podcasting is quickly becoming the latest creative mode of learning and presenting in schools.  Here are ten ideas to try in your classroom today.

 


Via Nik Peachey
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Sandra Carswell's curator insight, July 9, 2013 1:42 PM

I like some of these ideas. I'm thinking we could have students make podcast booktalks and have QR codes linking to them in the books or on a display or around the school. Hmm...kids can't use their phones at school, yet. Well, I can always put links to them in our catalog and on the website.

Connie Wise's curator insight, July 23, 2013 12:04 AM

Use podcasting to meet Common Core standards of speaking & writing.

BI Media Specialists's curator insight, August 19, 2013 3:05 PM

Let us know if we can try one of these projects with your class.

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Smithsonian Education - Resources for Educators

Smithsonian Education - Resources for Educators | Instruction | Scoop.it
Standards based lesson plans, activities, and teaching tools on art, history, science, and technology. Field trips, professional development, and access to Smithsonian museum collections and research.

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
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BookChook's curator insight, July 1, 2013 5:47 PM

A range of lesson plans, tools and resources. 

Shanthi Cumaraswamy Streat's curator insight, July 2, 2013 5:28 AM

These look very interesting.

Vannessa MissoVeness's curator insight, July 3, 2013 1:50 AM

Lovely website. Lots of ideas for classroom teaching. Thanks

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The Top 10 iPad Apps for Special Education -- THE Journal

The Top 10 iPad Apps for Special Education -- THE Journal | Instruction | Scoop.it

"The iPad takeover of public education isn’t just confined to the mainstream classroom: Special needs educators, too, are finding that  iPads can be a vital tool to support independence. What sets the iPad apart from other devices is the simple and visually robust user interface that can be used by almost everyone. It’s also a highly customizable device that can be set up with applications and assistive features to support a variety of special needs."


Via John Evans
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Stacey Py Flynn's comment, June 20, 2013 7:41 AM
Good stuff - thanks for the post!
Denver Leigh Watson, M.Ed, LDTC's curator insight, September 18, 2013 10:30 AM

I love these lists!

Marianne Gunn's curator insight, December 16, 2013 1:46 AM

While I do believe these apps could use a bit more work and cost a little less I am happy to see technology in special education classrooms. In many cases children with special needs cam work better with computers than they do with people.

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Lumosity - Brain Games & Brain Training

Lumosity - Brain Games & Brain Training | Instruction | Scoop.it
Improve your brain health and performance with brain games designed by neuroscientists to exercise memory and attention. Customize your personalized brain training program today.

Via Nik Peachey
Kaylin Burleson's insight:
Can't wait to use some of this info. This brain research fascinates me.
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Aline Choupin's curator insight, July 29, 2013 1:08 PM

again great stuff !

Moricz Krisztina's curator insight, August 1, 2013 4:14 AM

This is my absolute favourite. It works! And I love it! :) Try it!

Tatyana Oleinik's curator insight, August 2, 2013 5:29 AM

I'd do it

Rescooped by Kaylin Burleson from Geography Education
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UN projects Kenya to grow older and healthier

UN projects Kenya to grow older and healthier | Instruction | Scoop.it

The UN projects Kenya to grow older and healthier
Summary:

The number of infant deaths per 1,000 live births currently totals 51.6, and is expected to drop sharply to 12.1 by the end of the century.The country will also grow steadily older, with the current median age of 18 expected to more than double -- to 37 years of age -- by 2100.A Kenyan born this year can expect to live for 61.6 years.The nation's population will reach 160 million by the start of the next century, according to the new outlook.
Via Seth Dixon
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Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, March 17, 2014 4:59 PM

The UN projects that Kenyans will grow older and healthier. Infant deaths will decrease and age expectancy will increase. What will Kenyans have to do to be healthier? Lifestyle changes?

Nathan Chasse's curator insight, March 25, 2014 1:49 PM

This article provides statistics for the population growth of Kenya and other African nations in relation to the rest of the world. Africa features some of the world's highest birthrates and the world's youngest population. In Kenya, improving healthcare will see the life expectancy rise significantly due to less infant death while the population will become older as birthrates begin to decline, as they tend to do as a nation develops, but not before Kenya becomes one of the more populous nations in the world.

 

Kenya's growing population and increasing median age could mean good things for its economic prospects. Population growth along with maturation means there is a large and capable workforce available, but Kenya must have the resources and abilities to create jobs for its burgeoning population or face widespread poverty.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 4:01 PM

As the years go on, the world is learning how to live longer. With new medicinal practices and people supplying clean water and food to third world countries, there is definitely room for Kenya to grow old with the U.S. and other countries that have higher life expectancies.

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The Health Toll of Immigration

The Health Toll of Immigration | Instruction | Scoop.it
A growing body of mortality research on immigrants has shown that the longer they live in the United States, the worse their rates of heart disease, high blood pressure and diabetes.

Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, June 7, 2013 10:55 PM

This article highlights a fascinating cultural shift that impacts the migrants that come to the United States.  The second generation might have more money but they tend to live shorter lives than their parents.  As the next generation becomes integrated into American pop culture, unhealthy habits follow (smoking, drinking, high-calorie diets and sedentary lifestyles). 


Tags: migrationpopular culture, population, food, culture.

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How Leadership Can Make or Break Classroom Innovation | MindShift

How Leadership Can Make or Break Classroom Innovation | MindShift | Instruction | Scoop.it

But the most important thing Williams does as a forward-thinking superintendent is to support principal and teacher innovation. Rather than saying no when an idea conflicts with district policy, he works to change the policy. He’s found that working that way removes most of the barriers people cite as obstacles to fully integrating technology into classrooms.


Via Nik Peachey
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Nik Peachey's curator insight, June 7, 2013 6:09 AM

This really applies to management in many educational institutions. Many that try to inspire innovation just really need to release and support it.

Jennifer Hoover's curator insight, June 10, 2013 2:07 PM

Important as an instructional leader.

Carl Heine's curator insight, June 11, 2013 12:20 PM

Removing barriers is a big deal.

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Not All English is the Same

Not All English is the Same | Instruction | Scoop.it

"22 Maps That Show How Americans Speak English Totally Differently From Each Other"


Via Seth Dixon
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Lena Minassian's curator insight, January 27, 2015 5:58 PM

This article was actually funny and interesting. You do not really pay attention to the pronunciation of words just because we are surrounded by the same people who say a particular word the same way. Many individuals in the US are in for a culture shock if they leave their respected homes. One word that you have grown up with may be a completely different word in another area. We tend to not focus a lot of attention on the smaller details like this type of grammar and pronunciation so this caught my eye because it was interesting to think about and realize how you say words compared to the rest of the United States.

Louis Mazza's curator insight, January 28, 2015 11:53 AM

to me this is not so shocking but definitely entertaining. i mean between my family their is pronunciation differences. some say tomato others say toma`to right? not all English is the same is a concept that makes perfect sense to me. in other countries such as Italy, a person from the north cannot understand a person from the south because they speak in different dialects. perhaps it has to their with their location, or job types. but it holds true that different parts of a country can speak the same language in different ways. 

Kevin Cournoyer's curator insight, April 8, 2015 3:04 PM

I've seen this collection of maps a number of times before, but they are just as interesting and informative every time I look at them. It's really a fun exercise in seeing what phrases you use or how you pronounce certain words as opposed to the rest of the country. As a Rhode Islander, the bubbler/water fountain divide was of particular interest to me. I also found it funny that I have the vaguely Western/Midwestern tendency of calling "rotaries" (or what are traditionally called rotaries in my area), "roundabouts". This is especially curious to me, because I generally tend to think of that term as a British one. Could this possibly mean that a lot of British immigrants settled in the Western/Midwestern United States? Or am I just mistaken and buying into a poorly informed stereotype about British people?

 

Whatever the case, these maps are very informative and say a lot about the linguistic differences that occur even within one country. Now granted, the United States is a large country, so there is bound to be a good amount of variation. But it's still fascinating to me just how much variety there can be. The fact that when traveling, your use or pronunciation of a certain word or phrase can immediately identify you as an out-of-towner is very interesting. This is yet another example of the importance of doing your own research in order to avoid making incorrect assumptions. Just because all of the people within a geographic border may live in the same country, it does not mean that their dialects or colloquialisms are all the same. It does not even necessarily mean that they speak the same language. Different immigrant groups (because almost no country is impervious to immigration) settle in different areas and this ends up contributing (in part) to the different dialects and expressions that one finds within geographic borders.