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Rescooped by Raymond WM Fung from Protein Alternatives: Insects as Mini-Livestock - #InsectMeal
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Shrimp trial sets stage for insect protein in aquafeed

Shrimp trial sets stage for insect protein in aquafeed | Insect protein | Scoop.it
“The trial, conducted by Kasetsart University in Bangkok, confirmed the performance of Ynsect’s TMP (Tenebrio molitor defatted protein meal) in terms of its impact on weight gain, palatability and FCR (feed conversion ratio) in juvenile white leg shrimp. The best results were observed when TMP was included at a level of 10.3% in the diet (50% fishmeal replacement), with shrimp showing an increase of 33.7% in weight gain and 24% in final body weight and FCR decreasing by up to 25% versus those subjects fed a control diet. The researchers tested five different diets, one a control containing 25% fishmeal, and the other four containing different levels of TMP (25%, 50%, 75% and 100%) as a replacement for fishmeal. No significant difference was assessed in the palatability of the diets, but diets containing TMP resulted in greater weight gain and body weight by the end of the eight-week trial period. Besides monitoring feed performance criteria, the study included a challenge test performed with the pathogen Vibrio parahemolyticus, which is responsible for Early Mortality Syndrome. ”
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Maggots help MBA student find wriggle room in the recycling market

Maggots help MBA student find wriggle room in the recycling market | Insect protein | Scoop.it
“The four, who met as students at an environmental hackathon organised by Cambridge university’s entrepreneurship club, hit on the idea of turning unwanted food into animal feed by feeding scraps to an army of black soldier fly larvae.It was a concept that Joe Halstead, the biologist of the group, saw in action at his parents’ pig farm in Devon. The ravenous larvae are not easy on the eye but Halstead had seen how they could transform food waste into fertiliser and wondered what other useful products they could make.The team needed a business plan to turn the idea into a commercial reality. Fortunately one of their number, Matt McLaren, was studying for an MBA at the university’s Judge Business School. His alma mater had also recently started a three-month incubator programme for early stage ventures, called Accelerate Cambridge.”
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Scratch and Peck Feeds’ Search for Sustainable Bugs - WhatcomTalk

Scratch and Peck Feeds’ Search for Sustainable Bugs - WhatcomTalk | Insect protein | Scoop.it
“When Diana Ambauen-Meade, Founder and President of Scratch and Peck Feeds, first started researching ways to supplement the diets of chickens and ducks, she considered mealworms. Birds love mealworms, and they are a good source of protein. At first glance, it made sense to consider those insects as something the company wanted to offer to customers. What Ambauen-Meade learned, though, is that the common means of obtaining mealworms didn’t fit with part of the mission at Scratch and Peck Feeds – to offer sustainably produced and sourced ingredients. Most mealworms come from China, which means not only was the company not supporting their regional economy, they were also sourcing a product that requires overseas transport … and a lot of fuel along the way. Ambauen-Meade’s quest for a sustainable protein product continued.”
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Canadian approval for insects in salmon feed

Canadian approval for insects in salmon feed | Insect protein | Scoop.it
“Enterra Feed Corporation has received approval from the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) to sell its Whole Dried Black Soldier Fly Larvae as a feed ingredient for salmonids, including farmed salmon, trout and arctic char.With this approval, the company is now the first to market and sell this sustainable, natural product to aquaculture feed manufacturers in Canada. This is the first Canadian approval of an insect-based aquaculture feed ingredient, and follows the CFIA's approval using this same product in feed for chicken broilers last year. Enterra received a similar US approval for use in salmonid feeds in 2016.”
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What to feed the Black Soldier fly larvae?

What to feed the Black Soldier fly larvae? | Insect protein | Scoop.it
“The use of insect meal in livestock diets is a hot topic around the world. But equally important is to gain knowledge on what to feed the insects, to make sure the insect meal is nutritious and leads to high growth rates of the larvae.This is why agricultural students from a Dutch agricultural college looked at the optimum diet formulation for the Black Soldier Fly larvae (BSF). The BSF is used often for producing insect meal and grows well on waste streams from the food industry. The research has been commissioned by Dutch liquid feed by-product supplier Bonda.Parameters testedThe availability of the by-product streams, available at Bonda, formed the basis to formulate the ‘perfect’ diet for the larvae. Several raw materials were analysed for their ability to be the perfect structure, protein and/or energy source for the larvae. The zootechnical parameter used was growth rate and bioconversion. The students used different mashed feed formulations and divided these over different cups, each with 100 larvae (starting weight of 7-10 milligram per larvae) in each cup. Weight of the larvae was measured 3 times a week by taking a random sample of 20 larvae from each cup.”
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Are Cricket Bars the Next Big Thing? Grab These 5 Weird Food Products Now

Are Cricket Bars the Next Big Thing? Grab These 5 Weird Food Products Now | Insect protein | Scoop.it
“Yes, insect eating is trying to go mainstream in America, but if you're not ready to dig into a crunchy cricket quite yet, dip your toe in the bug-ingesting pool with a protein bar made with cricket flour. The bars' creators (friends from Brown University who launched their company via Kickstarter) claim that crickets are not only a complete protein that contain all the essential amino acids, but are also better for the environment, producing 100 times less greenhouse gases than cows. Flavors range from PB&J to banana bread; and no, you can't taste any actual crickets when you take a bite.”
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Microwave drying insect

Microwave drying insect | Insect protein | Scoop.it

Yellow powder insect is also called as mealworms or fly maggots. There is rich nutrition in the mealworm including 30% fat, 50% protein, phosphorus, potassium, sodium, iron and other microelement. Even the drying mealworm still contains 40% protein and other microelements as a wonderful feed. Therefore, many farmers take the mealworm as feeds for gold fish, tropical fish, bird, parrot, snake, turtle, centipede and other pets. The drying mealworm dramatically improves animal growing rate, rate of survive, disease-resistance, reproductive capacity. Why we choose microwave drying equipment for insect?1. MAX 2450MHz Powerful microwave equipment dramatically decreases the drying time and handy controls the condition of mealworm. 2. Comparing to traditional drying method, the microwave drying dehumidify the insects with good looking ,straight shape, original color and fresh. Only is the some liquid extracted 3. Microwave work as a radio frequency preserve the nutrition elements, mainly sterilize bacteria of mealworm to increase expiration date 4. MAX microwave drying system could continuously work for 24/7 with fully automatic conveyor and drying method. It could process large amount of material in few hours to dramatically improve the drying capacity.


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Unlocking Nigeria’s Agriculture Value Chain through Innovation - Nigeria Today

Unlocking Nigeria’s Agriculture Value Chain through Innovation - Nigeria Today | Insect protein | Scoop.it
Innovation underscored the Stanbic IBTC Business Leadership Series, which had the theme, ‘Gems in the Field.’ It was no surprise that the event had as headliner Jason Drew, South African farmer who grabbed global attention by creating a multi-million dollar business by rearing flies. Drew teamed up with Ogbeh and Kola Masha, Managing Director, Doreo Partners, an agriculture-focused investment firm, to provide critical insight on transforming Nigeria via agriculture.
Drew showcased at the event, a forum designed to inspire the next generation of Nigerian business leaders and entrepreneurs through knowledge sharing capable of optimising growth of the Nigerian economy, the significance of innovation, doggedness and creativity to business success.
Having identified a huge and growing need – meat and protein – Drew set up an eco-venture through which he harvested soldier flies which are reared to produce millions of tons of maggots which are processed, pressed and dried into nutrient-rich fertilizer and shipped to chicken farms and aquaculture plants as food. This translates to more meat and protein for human consumption.
Drew’s quest is driven by a simple calculation. The global population is projected to hit nine billion by 2050, an addition of two billion people from the current figure. Feeding the additional mouths will trigger a rapid demand for protein in the form of beef, pork, fish and chicken, which will be further buoyed by growing global prosperity and rising income levels in Asia and Africa. According to the World Health Organisation, global production of meat will have to increase to 376 million tonnes by 2030 if hopes of meeting the demand for protein from the developing world are to be met.

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Pepsi CEO Says: ‘Bugs Are the Food of the Future’

Pepsi CEO Says: ‘Bugs Are the Food of the Future’ | Insect protein | Scoop.it
“Bug-related stuff is big,” Nooyi told investors at the Net/Net event at the New York Stock Exchange. "[Experts] said the hottest thing is eating crickets. I am not talking about the game cricket, I am talking about crickets! In chips. And I am a vegetarian, I am not eating any cricket chips. But they said if you want a high protein source, there is a series of products being launched with crickets."

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Nutrient Absorption of Edible Insects Measures up to Beef

Nutrient Absorption of Edible Insects Measures up to Beef | Insect protein | Scoop.it
How about swapping beef with bugs? As more sustainable alternatives to eating meat and fish continue to trend, research into the nutrient levels of edible insects like grasshoppers and crickets reveals eating bugs could provide as much iron and other nutrients as consuming beef. 

A new study examines how the nutrients, particularly iron, provided by such insects really measures up to beef - and finds that bugs actually do fill that dietary need.

Dr Yemisi Latunde-Dada (pictured below), lecturer at the Diabetes and Nutritional Sciences Division Faculty of Life Sciences & Medicine at King’s College, London, tells FoodIngredientsFirst how grasshoppers, crickets, mealworms and buffalo worms were analyzed for their mineral contents. The team estimated how much each nutrient would likely get absorbed if eaten, by using a lab model of human digestion.

“Mineral levels and solubility (an index of availability) were determined in the insects. Cell culture model was used to measure absorption,” Dr Latunde-Dada says.

The insects had varying levels of iron, calcium, copper, magnesium, manganese and zinc. Crickets, for example, had higher levels of iron than the other insects did. Minerals including calcium, copper and zinc from grasshoppers, crickets and mealworms are more readily available for absorption than the same minerals from beef.

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How to knock out herpesvirus RNA transport — with applications from cold sores to cancer

How to knock out herpesvirus RNA transport — with applications from cold sores to cancer | Insect protein | Scoop.it
A new approach has been developed to combat diseases caused by herpesvirus infections, including everything from cold sores to cancer.

 

Researchers at the University of Leeds have discovered a way to prevent herpesviruses hijacking important pathways in cells which are required for the virus to replicate and cause disease.

Professor Adrian Whitehouse from the School of Molecular Biology and Astbury Centre for Structural Molecular Biology at the University led the five year study, the results of which are published today in the journal Nature Microbiology.

 

Prof Whitehouse said: "We've spent several years demonstrating that a protein found in all herpesviruses, recruits a protein complex in the host cell, called human TREX, to help stabilise and transport herpesvirus RNAs out of a cell's nucleus so they are turned into viral proteins. "Now we have identified a compound which can disrupt this essential virus-host cell interaction which in turn prevents herpesviruses replicating and producing infectious particles."

 

The approach the researchers used was unique as it targeted the enzyme activity of a key component of the cellular human TREX complex, known as UAP56.  Inhibiting t his activity prevented the remodelling of the human TREX complex which stopped the interaction with the viral protein.

 

The project is a collaboration between virologists led by Professor Whitehouse and a team of chemists led by Dr Richard Foster also from the University of Leeds. Dr Foster's team performed a virtual screen of thousands of compounds to identify potential inhibitors. These were then tested for their ability to stop herpesvirus replication without damaging the host cell.


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Emily's comment, November 21, 2016 12:57 AM
Look great
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First for Australia: BAP-Certified Rainbow Trout Farms | Aquaculture Directory

First for Australia: BAP-Certified Rainbow Trout Farms | Aquaculture Directory | Insect protein | Scoop.it
Congratulations to Goulburn River Trout, the first rainbow trout business in Australia and the Eastern Hemisphere to attain Best Aquaculture Practices (BAP) certification. Both of the company’s farms, Thornton Farm and Walnut Island Farm, which are located in the foothills of the Great Dividing Range in northeast Victoria, earned BAP certification on October 25.

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Coop soon to sell mealworms and crickets

Coop soon to sell mealworms and crickets | Insect protein | Scoop.it

Expected in spring 2017, the new food regulation enters into force. Sales of three species of insects as food is in Switzerland then allowed: mealworms, grasshoppers and crickets.


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Ana C. Day's curator insight, November 4, 2016 4:41 AM

"The retailer Coop wants to take a leading role in this new trend. Roland Frefel, head fresh products at Coop, said in an interview of 20 minutes that his company will have the date of legalization of insect products on the shelves. Possible make this a collaboration with the start-up Essento from Switzerland. What are the plans of Coop from? How to cook insects? See this and more in the video."

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Shrimp trial sets stage for insect protein in aquafeed

Shrimp trial sets stage for insect protein in aquafeed | Insect protein | Scoop.it
“The trial, conducted by Kasetsart University in Bangkok, confirmed the performance of Ynsect’s TMP (Tenebrio molitor defatted protein meal) in terms of its impact on weight gain, palatability and FCR (feed conversion ratio) in juvenile white leg shrimp. The best results were observed when TMP was included at a level of 10.3% in the diet (50% fishmeal replacement), with shrimp showing an increase of 33.7% in weight gain and 24% in final body weight and FCR decreasing by up to 25% versus those subjects fed a control diet. The researchers tested five different diets, one a control containing 25% fishmeal, and the other four containing different levels of TMP (25%, 50%, 75% and 100%) as a replacement for fishmeal. No significant difference was assessed in the palatability of the diets, but diets containing TMP resulted in greater weight gain and body weight by the end of the eight-week trial period. Besides monitoring feed performance criteria, the study included a challenge test performed with the pathogen Vibrio parahemolyticus, which is responsible for Early Mortality Syndrome. ”
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Evaluation of black soldier fly (Hermetia illucens) larvae as an alternative protein source in pig creep diets in relation to pr...

Evaluation of black soldier fly (Hermetia illucens) larvae as an alternative protein source in pig creep diets in relation to pr... | Insect protein | Scoop.it
“SummaryIn the animal nutrition industry it has become a necessity to seek sustainable and alternative protein sources for animal production. As an alternative protein source, insect meals have been reported to have various beneficial effects in both production and health of animals. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate the potential of black soldier fly (Hermetia illucens) larvae, grown on kitchen waste, as an alternative protein source in pig creep diets. The current trial included two treatment diets, i.e. a control diet containing no black soldier fly larvae meal (BSFLM) and an inclusion diet containing 3.5% BSFLM of the total diet. These diets were fed to 315 pure bred Large White and Landrace piglets from 10 to 28 days of age in a four week phase-over feeding scheme.The BSFLM contained, on a dry matter basis, a crude protein content of 35.9%, 48.1% crude fat, 6.5% crude fibre and 7.8% ash. Both the treatment diets were formulated to contain similar chemical compositions with a crude protein content of 22%, 6% crude fat, 2-4% crude fibre and 4-6% ash, as this provides for the piglet’s requirements (PIC, 2008). The first part of this study was to investigate the effect of larvae meal inclusion on the production parameters of the piglets. There were no significant (P>0.05) differences achieved for cumulative feed intake, 0.276 kg and 0.282 kg, and average daily gain (ADG), 0.203 kg and 0.199 kg, for the control and inclusion diets per piglet, resepectively. It was concluded that the BSFLM sustained normal growth and development of the young pigs and could be effectively utilized to partially replace other protein sources.”
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Enterra Receives CFIA Approval to Sell Insect Larvae to Aquaculture Industry

Enterra Receives CFIA Approval to Sell Insect Larvae to Aquaculture Industry | Insect protein | Scoop.it
“LANGLEY, BC--(Marketwired - February 15, 2017) - Enterra Feed Corporation has received approval from the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) to sell its Whole Dried Black Soldier Fly Larvae as a feed ingredient for salmonids, including farmed salmon, trout and arctic char. With this approval, the Metro Vancouver-based company is now the first to market and sell this sustainable, natural product to aquaculture feed manufacturers in Canada. This is the first Canadian approval of an insect-based aquaculture feed ingredient, and follows the CFIA's approval using this same product in feed for chicken broilers last year. Enterra received a similar U.S. approval for use in salmonid feeds in 2016.Canada is the fourth-largest producer of farmed salmon in the world, according to the Department of Fisheries and Oceans. In 2015 the farm gate value -- the net value when it leaves the farm -- of salmon and trout in Canada was $850 million1."Aquaculture feed producers have been keenly awaiting this approval and we look forward to supplying their needs immediately," said Andrew Vickerson, Chief Technology Officer, Enterra. "Fish eat insects in their natural environment and our product is a healthy, digestible and renewable source of protein and fat that can replace less sustainable ingredients, including fish meal and soybean meal."Production of fish meal, which is a standard aquaculture feed ingredient, can deplete wild ocean fish stocks and is subject to substantial price fluctuations. Soybean meal requires significant agricultural inputs that could otherwise be used more efficiently to grow food for people.”
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Vietnamese production base keeps costs low for Belgian insect meal producer

Vietnamese production base keeps costs low for Belgian insect meal producer | Insect protein | Scoop.it

We caught up the co-founders and directors of the Belgium headquartered insect meal producer, Alexandre de Caters and Gaetan Crielaard, ahead of VIV Asia later on this month.Entobel, they said, is attending the Bangkok trade show in the hope of extending its feed trial network and R&D partners: “We will introduce our products, mostly insect meal and insect oil, to potential clients interested in performing trials,” said the directors.Insect rearing on organic biomass and processing is the core activity of the company. Production is based on the Black Soldier Fly. Alongside the meal and oil, its product portfolio includes live and dried larvae and organic fertilizer.German company, Hermetia, is its technical partner. However, Entobel’s production is based in South Vietnam. It started operations in 2013: “Our pilot plant, with a capacity of 60 tons of fresh larvae a year, has been running for two years."


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Working with nature to help feed the world

Working with nature to help feed the world | Insect protein | Scoop.it

Jason Drew, CEO of AgriProtein, the first and largest commercial-scale insect meal producer in the world, is a man in a hurry. He has a planet to save and he’s using pesky flies to do so.Every day, at least 25,000 people die of starvation and the seas will soon be depleted of fish. Canada’s great fishing industry has already collapsed and Britain’s is threatened. People all over the globe aren’t getting enough protein to survive, let alone thrive.Some years ago, the entrepreneurial Drew, author of two books on the perilous state of the environment, saw a huge pool of blood with a thick cloud of flies hovering over it outside a chicken slaughterhouse near Stellenbosch. Its manager told Drew that a Stellenbosch University professor had told him that flies could be used to recycle the waste blood to make useable protein.Drew knew that in nature, both chicken and stream-inhabiting fish eat flies, not the fishmeal they are fed by humans. Trawlers produce fishmeal "in one of the most destructive activities on the planet", he says. In 2008, assisted by scientists, researchers, farmers and his brother David, Drew created AgriProtein. Today, it is valued at about R1.5bn.


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GOUZEAUCOURT - Un élevage de mouches implanté d’ici septembre, au moins quinze emplois à la clef

GOUZEAUCOURT - Un élevage de mouches implanté d’ici septembre, au moins quinze emplois à la clef | Insect protein | Scoop.it
“ L’annonce officielle a été faite ce mercredi à la communauté d’agglomération de Cambrai : Innova feed, une start-up de production de protéine d’insecte à destination de l’aquaculture, va s’implanter d’ici septembre prochain à Gouzeaucourt. L’entreprise recrute.”
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Bühler, Protix form joint insect production venture

Bühler, Protix form joint insect production venture | Insect protein | Scoop.it
As the world’s population grows, sustainably generated protein sources for livestock are becoming a more important aspect of food production. To that end, food and feed industry provider Bühler and insect production company Protix have founded Bühler Insect Technology Solutions, a Liyang, China-based joint venture that will develop industrial solutions for the rearing and processing of insects to provide protein for animal feed and food. The world’s population is projected to increase to more than nine billion people by 2050, which would require more than . . .
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Insects Are As Good A Source Of Iron As Beef

Insects Are As Good A Source Of Iron As Beef | Insect protein | Scoop.it
New research has found that buffalo worms are a better source of iron than beef, and grasshoppers aren’t far behind.

Insects are an attractive replacement for food animals like cows. They’re high in protein and relatively low in fat, which makes them a healthy option. They also have environmental advantages over livestock, like not needing a lot of land to graze on. And they don’t fart as much as cows, who make the greenhouse gas methane.

But can insects really take over the role meat plays in our diets? Meat is more than just protein; it also has minerals like iron and calcium. Nutrition researcher Gladys Latunde-Dada of King’s College London wanted to find out.

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Click here to support Converting Organic Waste Into Food by Saad Ringa

Click here to support Converting Organic Waste Into Food by Saad Ringa | Insect protein | Scoop.it
Converting Organic Waste Into Food

Modern societies produce a lot of organic waste. This waste is usually sent away to be buried in landfills. What if we could convert all the waste back to food? We can close the cycle!

By using Black Soldier Fly Larvae (BSFL), we are converting waste into high protein feed for chickens, fish, and other livestock. The process also produces a rich compost and liquid fertilizer.

Current Production

We have been experimenting with BSFL for six years now. Up until last year, we have been harvesting about 15 lbs per month during the wild BSF season, which is from June to October. The larvae were fed to our small flock of chickens. This year, we were able to produce up to 85 lbs per month, with the first harvest in mid May. We accomplished this by saving larvae from the previous year and starting the season in a small greenhouse-type setup. We diverted more than 2,500 lbs of organic material from the landfill and our gardens benefited from loads of compost and liquid fertilizer.

Via Ana C. Day, Jean-François Kleinfinger
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Bug-eating chef hosts new YouTube series

Bug-eating chef hosts new YouTube series | Insect protein | Scoop.it

Starting Wednesday, Chef Don Peavy will host a nine-episode web series, “Buggin' Out,” that producers hope will make you want to eat bugs.

The show will debut on Facebook and YouTube, focused on "entomophagy,” the practice of eating insects.


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Ana C. Day's curator insight, November 2, 2016 1:58 PM

"It's entertaining, but also an attempt to get more people used to the idea, as insects contain protein and nutrients and can be raised with less environmental damage than livestock farming.

The show is set in a Brooklyn, New York, kitchen with co-host Mosquito, a bearded magic dragon, as well as insect-eating human guests."

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Bugs in Bangkok before Bugs in Europe! - 4ento

Bugs in Bangkok before Bugs in Europe! - 4ento | Insect protein | Scoop.it
Insects as Food and Feed constitute one of the major options for a future source of protein to feed our fast growing population expected to reach about 9 billion in 2050 : at AETS in Bangkok where I am working in this field, it has been understood and there is an increasing move and development to the Ento way !

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So, what happened at FoodHack Geneva? – FoodHack – Medium

So, what happened at FoodHack Geneva? – FoodHack – Medium | Insect protein | Scoop.it
9:23pm: Word about the treats arrival quickly spreads and already a group has formed around Sylvia Schibli Saputra from Grimiam who is preparing the different delicacies for us to try.
9:30pm: The stage is set, 3 different kinds of insects cooked and ready, some straight from Sylvia's garden this morning. Accompanying is an appetiser of mash potatoes, coriander and maggots along with “insect breakfast bars”.
Sylvia explains the reasoning behind insects for human consumption and how they can be a part of our daily diet. Following this, she invites everyone to a taste. Whilst some people jump forward to have a try others crawl backward waiting to see their fellow participants reactions first.

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