Chasing the Future
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Chasing the Future
information related to new technologies & innovation, developments in science and space exploration
Curated by Sílvia Dias
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Rescooped by Sílvia Dias from Digital Design and Manufacturing
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Need a Chair? Now You Can 3D Print One at Home Thanks to Joris Laarman (video)

Need a Chair?  Now You Can 3D Print One at Home Thanks to Joris Laarman (video) | Chasing the Future | Scoop.it
Who says that 3D printers are only for making small objects such as toys, spare parts, and chess pieces? Artist Joris Laarman and several others are changing th

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Rescooped by Sílvia Dias from Short Look at the Long View
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Nanoparticle coating could let aircraft engines last three times longer

Nanoparticle coating could let aircraft engines last three times longer | Chasing the Future | Scoop.it
In order to run at high temperatures, the metal components of airplane engines are presently treated with heat-shielding coatings. Scientists are now develo...

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Joel Barker's curator insight, March 28, 2014 8:19 PM

One of the most important attributes of new technology should be how long they last. Especially things like jet engines can benefit from this kind of "life extension." The implications, of course, are significant for the engine builders since these new engines could last three times longer.  JB

Rescooped by Sílvia Dias from Tracking the Future
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Titanium powder used to 3D print automotive parts

Titanium powder used to 3D print automotive parts | Chasing the Future | Scoop.it

To date, the 3D printing revolution has focused on the use of plastics – cheap printers' feedstock and high throughput. Until now 3D printing with metal has been prohibitively expensive because of the cost of titanium powders which currently sell for $200-$400 per kilogram.
Rotherham based company Metalysis have developed a new way of producing low-lost titanium powder, which heralds a new era in additive layer manufacture, and will see greater use of titanium in components across the automotive, aerospace and defence industries.
The Renishaw 3D printer, which is based at the Mercury Centre within the Department of Materials at the University of Sheffield, made the parts, demonstrating the feasibility of producing titanium components using additive layer manufacturing.
The Metalysis process is radically cheaper and environmentally benign compared with existing titanium production methods, such as the energy-intensive and toxic Kroll process.


Via Szabolcs Kósa
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Material Science Revolution: lightweight, strong and 3D printed

Material Science Revolution: lightweight, strong and 3D printed | Chasing the Future | Scoop.it

"The next generation of materials are growing stronger and lighter thanks to superior modelling technology and 3D printing systems. Take the the Nanoscribe 3D printer Photonic Professional GT: this 3D laser lithography system can tackle rapid and powerful micro – and nanofabrication tasks in three dimensions. "


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Rescooped by Sílvia Dias from Cool New Tech
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Space elevator could be built by 2035

Space elevator could be built by 2035 | Chasing the Future | Scoop.it

Imagine a ribbon roughly one hundred million times as long as it is wide. If it were a meter long, it would be 10 nanometers wide, or just a few times thicker than a DNA double helix. Scaled up to the length of a football field, it would still be less than a micrometer across — smaller than a red blood cell. Would you trust your life to that thread? What about a tether 100,000 kilometers long, one stretching from the surface of the Earth to well past geostationary orbit (GEO, 22,236 miles up), but which was still somehow narrower than your own wingspan?

The idea of climbing such a ribbon with just your body weight sounds precarious enough, but the ribbon predicted by a new report from the International Academy of Astronautics (IAA) will be able to carry up to seven 20-ton payloads at once. It will serve as a tether stretching far beyond geostationary (aka geosynchronous) orbit and held taught by an anchor of roughly two million kilograms. Sending payloads up this backbone could fundamentally change the human relationship with space — every climber sent up the tether could match the space shuttle in capacity, allowing up to a “launch” every couple of days.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald, Szabolcs Kósa, Kalani Kirk Hausman
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Laura E. Mirian, PhD's curator insight, March 9, 2014 12:49 AM

Think I will pass on this

Linda Liem's curator insight, March 9, 2014 8:06 AM

Science fiction may be coming true.

Guillaume Decugis's curator insight, March 10, 2014 10:41 PM

Hundreds of challenges remain to be solved but as even NASA struggles to maintain an edge, the pay-off of a Space Elevator has never been clearer. The original idea of Konstantin Tsiolkovsky which Arthur C. Clarke turned into a novel could be the revolution space exploration needs.

Rescooped by Sílvia Dias from Tracking the Future
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Researchers create CMOS-compatible, 30nm programmable graphene transistor

Researchers create CMOS-compatible, 30nm programmable graphene transistor | Chasing the Future | Scoop.it

Electronic engineers at Japan’s GNC and AIST research centers have successfully created graphene transistors that are constructed and operated in a way that redefines 50 years of transistor development. These graphene transistors can be built using conventional CMOS processes, and could potentially be many times smaller, hundreds of times faster, and consume much less power than silicon transistors.


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