Future Ready: The Emerging New Library/Librarian Experience | innovative libraries | Scoop.it

Libraries and librarians are all about experiences. How would you describe the experience of dealing with you? What are the benefits? In this post, I’d like to explore the knowledge experience and how it has changed over the years with respect to the library/librarian value proposition. As we enter an era of new opportunities it’s wise to see how we got to this point.

First, let’s start with an assumption and my bias. I don’t believe that you can call anything a library unless there’s an information professional (librarian, technician, archivist, records manager, etc.) involved. In the old days that would have been merely a book room or warehouse for paper. It wasn’t a library at all and wouldn’t be today. Today, a web presence without the involvement and animation of an information pro is just a website—truly plain and simple. A search box simply doesn’t meet the mark in rising to be a true modern library experience, since there’s not, to my mind and opinion, enough value-added in the experience. In order to define something/somewhere as a library there must be some personal increase in the value received in the experience that results in the transformation of the user.



Stephen Abram describes the 4 stages in the history of physical and virtual library experiences: Stage 1: access to library books Stage 2: services added to the book foundation Stage 3: library services differentiated based on service design Stage 4: libraries co-create experiences with our users Stephen Abram describes the 4 stages in the history of physical and virtual library experiences: Stage 1: access to library books Stage 2: services added to the book foundation Stage 3: library services differentiated based on service design Stage 4: libraries co-create experiences with our users