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A Vending Machine Now Distributes Free Short Stories at Francis Ford Coppola's Café Zoetrope

A Vending Machine Now Distributes Free Short Stories at Francis Ford Coppola's Café Zoetrope | innovative libraries | Scoop.it

I loved the idea of a vending machine, a dispensing machine that doesn’t dispense potato chips or beer or coffee for money but gives you art. I especially liked the fact that you didn’t put money in. - Filmmaker Francis Ford Coppola

Thusly did filmmaker Coppola arrange for a free Short Edition story vending machine to be installed in Café Zoetrope, his San Francisco restaurant.

The French-built machine is the perfect companion for solitary diners, freely dispensing tales on skinny, eco-friendly paper with the push of a button. Readers have a choice over the type of story—romantic, funny, scary—and the amount of time they’re willing to devote to it.

After which, they can perhaps begin the task of adapting it into a feature-length film script. Part of Coppola’s attraction to the form is that short stories, like movies, are intended to be consumed in a single sitting.

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Brooklyn Public Library’s Central Branch will get a $135M upgrade

Brooklyn Public Library’s Central Branch will get a $135M upgrade | innovative libraries | Scoop.it

The Brooklyn Public Library’s imposing Central Branch will get some 21st-century friendly upgrades as part of $135 million revamp over the next two years.

“We are focused on broadening the definition of what it means to be literate,” Linda E. Johnson, president and chief executive of the Brooklyn Public Library system told the New York Times. “A hundred years ago, it was transactional: You borrowed a book, in English. You took it home. You brought it back.”

That, however, is no longer the case. Today, libraries not only act as a revolving door for the voracious reader, but also as a lifeline to classes in topics like ESL and computer literacy. Those extracurricular activities are needed all the more in Brooklyn, where a third of the borough’s households speak a language other than English. The revamp will create spaces for learning off the page.

“One of the problems is none of these libraries were built when anyone was thinking about technology. Being literate today means being digitally fluent,” Johnson told the Times.

Some of the building’s off-limits areas will be converted into useable public space: Two levels of stacks and other rooms once used for behind-the-scenes tasks like putting protective covers on the books will be converted into a new “experience space” where kids will be able to learn about things like robotics and 3D printing, among other things.

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Austin is reinventing the public library, and Dallas should too | Architecture

Austin is reinventing the public library, and Dallas should too | Architecture | innovative libraries | Scoop.it

Five years ago, at a time when the library was under assault as an obsolete institution in the digital age, writer and critic Zadie Smith argued to the contrary in a widely quoted essay. "What a good library offers cannot be easily found elsewhere: an indoor public space in which you do not have to buy anything in order to stay." In short order that bit of wisdom has been received, such that providing storage and access to books is now just one element of the library program, and arguably not the principal one. The new Central Library in Austin is a case in point. There are books, to be sure, but it was built to be much more than a place to read them. It is, as well, a co-working place, a conference center, an educational facility, a technology hub, a business incubator, a gallery, a bookstore, a live-music venue and performance space, a café, a butterfly garden, a bicycle repair clinic, and just about anything else Austinites might imagine for it.

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Recording studios and saunas: what Finland can teach the UK about libraries

Recording studios and saunas: what Finland can teach the UK about libraries | innovative libraries | Scoop.it

Yes, you can borrow books – but also musical instruments, footballs and sewing machines. 


Walking through the grand entrance hall of Kallio Library in Helsinki, it's hard to believe it began life as a homeless shelter. Shelves heaving with books in different languages are neatly stacked, and a piano sits in the middle of a large event space in the centre.
There's a comic book room, a section where you can borrow musical instruments, and a rainbow corner dedicated to LGBT literature. On the top floor, the lively (but still immaculately tidy) children's section features a quiet “fairytale attic” with desks for doing homework. It's full of kids who have come straight here with friends after school, as they do most days.
“The use of libraries is changing – more and more people use this as a workspace, they're here for hours and hours with their laptops,” says service administrator Kalle Riiheläinen.

“I think that if we removed all the books and replaced them with laptop points where you can charge your battery, it would still be as crowded and full... but of course we don't want to do that.”

It can't be a coincidence that Finland, a country with one of the highest literacy rates in the world, also boasts a network of effective, well-stocked libraries that people actually use – from students and freelancers to families. Around 2,000 customers visit Kallio Library every day – more than 600,000 a year – mostly local residents who travel less than 1km. They check out half a million items annually.

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Library Creates Genius Bookmark To Teach Students How To Spot Fake News

Library Creates Genius Bookmark To Teach Students How To Spot Fake News | innovative libraries | Scoop.it

Though he's often wrong about his sources, President Trump is very right about one thing: there's a lot of fake news swirling around the internet these days. In fact, the problem has become so prevalent that many teachers are taking extra steps to ensure their students can tell which news is fake and which is real.

For instance, Reddit user soldier4hire was at his local library when he noticed a unique bookmark.


SOLDIER4HIRE/REDDIT
Arming their readers with knowledge, the library was distributing some awesome advice: when reading an article online, check the headline, author, and URL. Look at fact-checking sites like Politifact and Snopes to ensure the story's authenticity. Compare it to other reliable sources.


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Libraries in the 21st century: the struggle between perception and reality | IB Community Blog

Libraries in the 21st century: the struggle between perception and reality | IB Community Blog | innovative libraries | Scoop.it

Librarians make libraries “loveable!” (Photo submitted by Carole Mondin, then at American International School of Lagos, Nigeria)


It speaks volumes when the man in charge of the world’s fourth-biggest public library insists digital technologies are an opportunity rather than a threat to libraries. In an interview with Forbes Magazine, Anthony W Marx, president of New York Public Library, countered fears that they were dying:

There are people who think that the Digital Age is a mortal threat to the library. I think it’s the greatest opportunity in the history of libraries, and that means that this institution of huge scale and beloved by millions of people is also at a moment of revitalizing itself fundamentally. In my line of work, that’s an unbeatable combination.

In truth, libraries and librarians have fundamentally changed but not everyone has noticed. Those with the privilege of internet access have the ability to find every sort of information offered on the web. Much of modern global culture has been captured into bits and bytes of data, then packaged for consumption to suit every preference. The internet in these ways seems very similar to a library, or at least a repository of information, distributed on a global scale but accessed locally. However, the presence of the internet has obscured the library, making many unaware of how it has evolved, what makes it different, and why it is so important to co-exist with the internet.

Dr Marx points out this distinction:

The library is misunderstood as a repository of books. The library is a repository of information, and a sharing, and providing of access to information, and guide to using it.

Many librarians see collaboration as the most impactful aspect of their work.  The internet is no doubt a giant resource, but it does not guide creativity and understanding—it is designed to reflect preferences rather than needs. Algorithms, bots and social media tracking filter and package information based on searches but they do not highlight information that helps us to learn and grow in understanding. Humans still need to research, analyze, and ultimately decide on complex, difficult issues. Internet sources are not usually designed to assist in doing these things. In fact, they can negatively affect our judgment and restrict what we do depending on how the information is packaged.

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For the Love of Libraries: How Libraries Use Content to Tell New Stories

For the Love of Libraries: How Libraries Use Content to Tell New Stories | innovative libraries | Scoop.it

I never gave much thought to library marketing until I met Angela Hursh, content team leader in the marketing department of the Public Library of Cincinnati and Hamilton County. Going to my neighborhood library to browse and check out books is one of my favorite things to do; I’ve been visiting on a regular basis for as long as I can remember. As a dedicated bookworm, I took for granted the effort of marketing the library does to reach people for whom visiting isn’t second nature.

While my personal interest is book-centric, libraries offer much more to the local community, of course. At the library you can learn a new language, get help with your income taxes, or use a 3-D printer. Parents can bring their kids for story time. Teens have a safe, comfortable space in which to do their homework. Senior citizens can take computer classes.

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A Night of Philosophy and Ideas at the Brooklyn Public Library

A Night of Philosophy and Ideas at the Brooklyn Public Library | innovative libraries | Scoop.it
Written by John Seroff January 25, 2018
A Night of Philosophy and Ideas is a thinker’s lollapalooza. The free, 12-hour weekend lyceum at the Brooklyn Public Library includes spirited debate, live music, theater, performance art pieces, and film screenings. At any given hour, five or six different events will be taking place simultaneously. Visitors are encouraged to come and go as the spirit moves them.
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Future Ready: The Emerging New Library/Librarian Experience

Future Ready: The Emerging New Library/Librarian Experience | innovative libraries | Scoop.it

Libraries and librarians are all about experiences. How would you describe the experience of dealing with you? What are the benefits? In this post, I’d like to explore the knowledge experience and how it has changed over the years with respect to the library/librarian value proposition. As we enter an era of new opportunities it’s wise to see how we got to this point.

First, let’s start with an assumption and my bias. I don’t believe that you can call anything a library unless there’s an information professional (librarian, technician, archivist, records manager, etc.) involved. In the old days that would have been merely a book room or warehouse for paper. It wasn’t a library at all and wouldn’t be today. Today, a web presence without the involvement and animation of an information pro is just a website—truly plain and simple. A search box simply doesn’t meet the mark in rising to be a true modern library experience, since there’s not, to my mind and opinion, enough value-added in the experience. In order to define something/somewhere as a library there must be some personal increase in the value received in the experience that results in the transformation of the user.



Stephen Abram describes the 4 stages in the history of physical and virtual library experiences: Stage 1: access to library books Stage 2: services added to the book foundation Stage 3: library services differentiated based on service design Stage 4: libraries co-create experiences with our users Stephen Abram describes the 4 stages in the history of physical and virtual library experiences: Stage 1: access to library books Stage 2: services added to the book foundation Stage 3: library services differentiated based on service design Stage 4: libraries co-create experiences with our users


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Photos Show the Light and the Dark in Zaha Hadid Architects' Vienna Library

Photos Show the Light and the Dark in Zaha Hadid Architects' Vienna Library | innovative libraries | Scoop.it
Edwin Seda's photographs explore the impact of light on Zaha Hadid Architects' Library and Learning Centre at the University of Economics Vienna.
Via michaelcollins
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New program puts social workers in some First State libraries

New program puts social workers in some First State libraries | innovative libraries | Scoop.it

Delaware’s Department of Health and Social Services and the Division of Libraries are teaming up to make some state services more accessible.

A pilot program is bringing state social workers to a handful of libraries across the state on a weekly basis.
Two social workers from Division of Social Services’ Community Partner Support Unit will be available at seven different libraries once a week for three hours.

Division of Social Services director Ray Fitzgerald says many people they serve already look to libraries for resources and are comfortable going there.

“Libraries have computers and other resources – and it’s a warm place.  Some people who are homeless may frequent there.  We know libraries provide services to everybody, but some of the people, low income families we’re attempting to reach frequent the library so we figure that would be a win-win," said Fitzgerald.

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Libraries: a trio of European court rulings | EIFL

Libraries: a trio of European court rulings | EIFL | innovative libraries | Scoop.it
In recent years, the Court of Justice of the European Union (CJEU), Europe’s highest court, has made three important rulings concerning digital library activities in Europe.

The first of the three CJEU rulings took place in 2014, and originated in Germany in a case known as ‘TU Darmstadt’ (Case C-117/13). The ruling in TU Darmstadt is seen as a significant boost for European libraries to digitize works in their collections and to make them available in library reading rooms.

In November 2016, in cases that began in the Netherlands and France, two equally important issues were adjudicated by the Court: the lending of e-books by libraries, and author consent for the digital exploitation of their works.

In this guest blog for EIFL, Vincent Bonnet, Director, European Bureau of Library, Information and Documentation Associations (EBLIDA) and Barbara Stratton, Chair, EBLIDA Expert Group on Information Law, discuss the two most recent cases, and examine what they mean for libraries in Europe and beyond.
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The Extinction of Libraries: Why the Predictions aren’t Coming True

The Extinction of Libraries: Why the Predictions aren’t  Coming True | innovative libraries | Scoop.it

When was the last time you went to the library and for what purpose?

For what purpose do libraries exist? For books, right? 

The purpose of libraries has always been a hub for information. Our need for information has not changed just the way we receive the information has.

Five years ago Forbes published an article asking this very question, “Will Public Libraries Become Extinct” (https://www.forbes.com/sites/quora/2012/10/02/will-public-libraries-become-extinct/#2d5f14b3693c) and the answer in the article was yes, in fact the prediction was that we would see a decline within 5 years and within 15 years, poof they will be gone.

Just 5 years prior to this prediction the Pew Research Center released a study that indicated that “Libraries drew visits by more than half of Americans (53%) in the past year for all kinds of purposes, not just the problems mentioned in the survey. And young adults in tech-loving Generation Y (age 18-30) led the pack. Compared with their elders, Gen Y members were the most likely to use libraries for problem-solving information and in general patronage for any purpose. Furthermore, young adults are the most likely to say they will use libraries in the future when they encounter problems: 40% of Gen Y say they would do that, compared with 20% of those above age 30 who say they would go to a library.” (http://pewresearch.org/pubs/677/in-search-of-solutions)

We have seen a surge in library usage since this study as libraries helped people everywhere during the “Great Recession” and continue to be not only valid but thriving.  Why is this?

Libraries are way more than books, they are vibrant community centers with programs and activities full of life, discovery, and excitement. Today’s libraries are places people are engaging and learning about new technology from 3D printers and virtual reality to coding and robotics. In addition to this discovery and excitement libraries are a resource for finding employment, obtaining new skills, and yes still a great place to find a good book.

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Chattanooga Public Library Introduces Indoor Play Equipment to the Delight of its Patrons

Chattanooga Public Library Introduces Indoor Play Equipment to the Delight of its Patrons | innovative libraries | Scoop.it

Over 75 excited visitors converged at the Chattanooga Public Library last week to experience an innovative new play product that is designed to spark the brains of its youngest patrons. "In many ways our library is a learning playground for kids of all ages. Now, with SnugPlay at our downtown branch, there are even more child-directed play options where children choose what to play with and then make up their own rules. And kids are always going to climb, so why not give them the equipment and a safe place to do so," stated Corinne Hill, Director of the Downtown Chattanooga Public Library.

The downtown branch received their SnugPlay equipment on a Wednesday and wasted no time having it installed in time for a busy Saturday in the children's department. The portable nature and interactive, dynamic pieces stimulate spontaneous and cooperative play that invite both children and adults to participate and engage in meaningful play.

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Carnegie Library Lab

Carnegie Library Lab | innovative libraries | Scoop.it

 Carnegie Library Lab is our programme aimed at supporting and developing innovation and leadership in the public library sector.

We are currently looking for applications from individual library staff working in early and mid-management roles across the UK and Ireland. Successful applicants will work with us as Carnegie Partners for 18 months (June 2018 and September 2019).
We have previously worked with two cohorts of Partners, from libraries throughout the UK and Ireland.

Carnegie Library Lab offers participants:
- financial support to develop and deliver an innovative, practical project in their local library service;
- exclusive access to a bespoke online learning programme to support innovation, leadership and skills development;
- access to an external mentor to assist with project management and personal development;
- networking events including face-to-face meetings and online platform; and an external evaluation.

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Jenny Ryan | Movers & Shakers 2018 – Educators

Jenny Ryan | Movers & Shakers 2018 – Educators | innovative libraries | Scoop.it

Super Representation. In Saskatoon, First Nations people make up nine percent of the population, and Jenny Ryan wanted to find ways to serve those communities. So when she came across the story of a new DC superhero, Equinox—a young, female Cree—she got excited. “I had been trying to find representation of indigenous teens to add to the collection, and I wanted more female representation, too,” she says.

Ryan organized an event at the Saskatoon Public Library (SPL) around the comic’s publication, incorporating performances by indigenous drummers and youth dancers, as well as a Skype Q&A with the comic’s creator, Jeff Lemire. She contacted a cultural advisor in a local school to ensure that interactions with tribal Elders were respectful and appropriate. There was one major benefit of all this learning, says Ryan. “The young people at the event saw indigenous and nonindigenous adults working together to honor traditional practices.”

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Lots of movers&shakers in the library world. Here is just one of them.
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Newsmaker: Emilio Estevez: actor and filmmaker tackles the library response to homelessness

Newsmaker: Emilio Estevez: actor and filmmaker tackles the library response to homelessness | innovative libraries | Scoop.it

Emilio Estevez is no stranger to the library world. Thirty-three years after portraying one of five teens sentenced to Saturday detention in a school library in the 1985 teen classic The Breakfast Club, Estevez steps behind the camera to write, direct, and star in The Public, about a group of homeless people who seek refuge in Cincinnati’s downtown public library during a bitterly cold Midwestern winter evening. A staunch library advocate, Estevez spoke with American Libraries about the film, its origin, and his connection to libraries.

What was the inspiration behind The Public?

I was inspired by a moving 2007 essay called “Written Off” by Chip Ward, now-retired assistant director of the Salt Lake City Public Library System, published in part in the Los Angeles Times (and in full at tomdispatch.com under the title, “What They Didn’t Teach Us in Library School: The Public Library as an Asylum for the Homeless”). Ward’s essay was not hyperbole. We are in the midst of an epidemic. I knew the world Ward described: I completed the bulk of the research for my film Bobby at Los Angeles Public Library’s Central Library downtown, and Salt Lake City Public Library was identical to what I witnessed there. I have carried that section of the Los Angeles Times in a folder in my backpack for the past 11 years, and I show it to anyone who asks where the inspiration for this story originally came from.

What obligations do libraries and other public spaces have to help the homeless and other populations in need?


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6 Trends Driving Technology Adoption in Libraries | Wiley

6 Trends Driving Technology Adoption in Libraries | Wiley | innovative libraries | Scoop.it

As Benjamin Franklin, founder of one of the earliest lending libraries in America, once said, “When you’re finished changing, you’re finished.” Fortunately for all of us, academic and research libraries (ARLs) are apparently not finished just yet. At least, they are not finished according to the NMC Horizon Report: 2017 Library Edition. In this report education and technology experts identify six trends they predict will influence technology-related decision-making by academic and research libraries over the next five years, as they evolve into the libraries of the future.

Short-Term Trends are those considered to be currently driving technology adoption in academic and research libraries but which are expected to become either commonplace or to fade in importance over the next one to two years. For this time frame, the two trends considered the most impactful by the Project’s experts include Research Data Management and Valuing the User Experience.

1. Libraries taking on Research Data Management
2. Valuing the User Experience

 Mid-Term Trends are those expected to become increasingly vital in driving technology adoption over the next several years and to have their greatest impact on decision-making over the next 3-5 years. The two most impactful trends discussed in the Report for this time frame include Patrons as Creators and Rethinking Library Spaces.

3. Patrons as Creators
4. Rethinking Library Spaces

Long-Term Trends are trends seen as currently impacting technology adoption decisions and which are predicted to continue to do so for the next five years and more. The Horizon Project’s two most impactful trends over this timeframe include Cross-Institution Collaboration and the Evolving Nature of the Scholarly Record.


5. Cross-Institution Collaboration

6. Evolving Nature of the Scholarly Record

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Peter Fellows: What are libraries for?

Peter Fellows: What are libraries for? | innovative libraries | Scoop.it

OpinionFebruary 28, 2018
By Guest Columnist
Within the time taken to do a half-hearted Google and burn my face on a cup of tea, it’s made abundantly clear that writers using what they perceive to be clever puns about libraries do not go down well with librarians. And so I punched backspace on the words “turning a new chapter”, “end of story” and “Be LESS Quiet Please (re campaigning for libraries)”, burnt my face again, checked Twitter (oh look, a follow from someone called @PalletMeister, whose profile picture is of some pallets), then turned to my emails.

“We often hear about the wonderful work that libraries do, but all of this wonderful work depends on the library workers doing their jobs. This discussion should not be about buildings, it should be about the people who are making our libraries great.”

I stared at those words and felt a jolt of anxiety shimmy through my guts. They’d come from Dawn Finch, a brilliant children’s writer and current President of the Chartered Institute of Library and Information Professionals. Dawn holds over 27 years’ experience in public libraries. I, by stark comparison, had spent a few minutes dousing myself in the facts and figures surrounding their mass closure: In the financial year of 2014/15, the UK lost 106 public libraries… 260 static libraries were put under threat of closure… Last year there were still 3,850 public libraries in the UK, whereas in 2009 there were 4,482.

I recently overheard this sentence (in a pub of all places): “Kids having access to books at home is a middle-class privilege”. That’s a dangerous way to look at the world. It ties into the fear of difference, distrust of knowledge

You do the maths ‘coz I’m too lazy, but basically IT LOOKS BAD FOR LIBRARIES. There are 5.4 million library visits every week in the UK. There are 5.4 million people in Scotland. That second bit is to give a little context; I’m not saying that all 5.4 million visitors are Scottish. But some of them, inevitably, are.

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Why university libraries are tossing millions of books - CSMonitor.com

Why university libraries are tossing millions of books - CSMonitor.com | innovative libraries | Scoop.it

FEBRUARY 7, 2018 INDIANA, PA.—A library without books? Not quite, but as students abandon the stacks in favor of online reference material, university libraries are unloading millions of unread volumes in a nationwide purge that has some print-loving scholars deeply unsettled.

Libraries are putting books in storage, contracting with resellers, or simply recycling them. An ever-increasing number of books exist in the cloud, and libraries are banding together to ensure print copies are retained by someone, somewhere. Still, that doesn't always sit well with academics who practically live in the library and argue that large, readily available print collections are vital to research.

"It's not entirely comfortable for anyone," said Rick Lugg, executive director of OCLC Sustainable Collection Services, which helps libraries analyze their holdings. "But absent endless resources to handle this stuff, it's a situation that has to be faced."

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What changes will 2018 bring to libraries? - directly from library experts

What changes will 2018 bring to libraries? - directly from library experts | innovative libraries | Scoop.it
Wondering what changes will 2018 bring to libraries? Stephen Abram, Jane Cowell and Laurinda Thomas shared their thoughts with us. Read their insights here!
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How public libraries are reinventing themselves for the 21st century

How public libraries are reinventing themselves for the 21st century | innovative libraries | Scoop.it

On any given day, in one of the world’s busiest urban library systems, 50,000 people come through the doors of the Toronto Public Library’s 100 branches, while 85,000 make an online visit. The walk-ins bring their coffee and their lunches; they talk and watch TV while charging their phones; they do their homework, often via thousands of computer sessions; they make videos or create objects with 3D printers; take classes in computer coding or yoga; attend author talks or listen to experts offer advice for those looking after elderly relatives; access video tutorials on everything from website design to small business management from Lynda.com (an American online education giant that offers 3,600 courses taught by industry experts). Together with their online fellows, they borrow musical instruments, passes to the city’s art galleries and museums, WiFi hotspots, lamps that battle seasonal affective disorder, Raspberry Pis (small, single-board computers primarily used for coding training), DVDs, more than 12,000 ebooks and—of course—plain old print-and-ink books, a good 90,000 of them every day. All at no cost.

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s.pierros's curator insight, January 31, 6:52 AM
To Τορόντο έχει πληθυσμό περίπου 3 εκατομμύρια και η Δημόσια Βιβλιοθήκη του Τορόντο το 2016 ξόδεψε [https://goo.gl/vAhDbS] περίπου 195 εκατομμύρια δολάρια Καναδά (περισσότερο από 120 εκατομμύρια ευρώ) - περίπου 40 ευρώ ανά κάτοικο. 


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Dartmouth 'blazing a trail' with new outdoor library | by Justin Trudeau Stories - YouTube

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SWIB17 - Semantic Web in Libraries | Programme

SWIB17 - Semantic Web in Libraries | Programme | innovative libraries | Scoop.it

(UPDATED) slides (download) from  the conference SWIB17 - Semantic Web in Libraries. 04 - 06 December 2017 in Hamburg.

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5 Elements To Keep In Mind When Measuring Your Library’s Success

5 Elements To Keep In Mind When Measuring Your Library’s Success | innovative libraries | Scoop.it

Every library should have some key performance indicators that help evaluate the effectiveness of its strategy. Yet, libraries can struggle in proving their importance to policy makers and to the community.

As we analyzed the library trends of 2017, it is clear that the focus of libraries and the challenges they face have remained the same as in the previous years: the continuous need to involve the whole community in the library’s activity and to target the services to their changing needs and also the imperative need to keep up with the tech changes nowadays.

So, how can libraries measure their success in this challenging time when their very existence is being questioned?  What makes a library successful?

How can #libraries measure their success in this challenging time when their very existence is being questioned? 
1. Collections
2. Services and programs
3. Users and communities
4. Technology
5. Staff

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