Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend?
3.3K views | +0 today
Follow
Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend?
Where innovation is happening beyond the stuff of small start-ups & tech companies. For the BEST of the BEST curated news in performance, change, agile learning, innovation, motivation and careers, SUBSCRIBE to REVELN.com/Tools/
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN
Scoop.it!

Innovation vs. Measurement & Systems: Leadership Is Always The Key

Innovation vs. Measurement & Systems:  Leadership Is Always The Key | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

"Think of “win-lose” structures in incentives.  If you can only win if someone else loses, what are the odds of your developing a working relationship grounded in trust?"

Trust:

Strong leadership can recognize “win-lose” structures or norms and work to eliminate them.  It seems obvious that leadership drives trust, not systems.


_________________________

Without ...systems ...built to allow for ...individual and group failure, risk will always be a negative organizational value. 


_________________________


DIVERSITY:      . . . of people, points of view, ideas, ethics, and beliefs.  Diversity is what drives and powers iteration, constant challenge, testing, playing, and randomness. Strong leadership will drive (or diminish) diversity much more profoundly than will the most deeply embedded systems.  


RISK:     Risk tolerance and the attractiveness of rapid iteration are the hallmarks of innovative organizations.  Without operational systems that are built to allow for and to contextualize individual and group failure, risk will always be a negative organizational value.


...Should you be thinking a little more about how you encourage and foster strong leadership, and a little less about your systems of measurement and evaluation.?  You might be surprised by where this reflection will take you.

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

The venture capitalist who wrote this post has a view I share on putting measurement and evaluation within the right context, including a certain tolerance for enough risk-taking to help organizations be adaptive and "anti-fragile." ~  Deb

more...
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, July 5, 2013 8:29 PM

This is also shared here via Performance and Talent Development because of the theme of leadership above performance systems, and leadership to build an innovation, adaptive culture that trumps traditional measurement practices. ~  D

Rescooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN from The Jazz of Innovation
Scoop.it!

Big Companies Need Small Companies in their Open Innovation Ecosystems

Big Companies Need Small Companies in their Open Innovation Ecosystems | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

Matching to Innovate:  Small companies often are at the leading edge of breakthrough or disruptive innovation, and need the resources the larger company can provide.

 

This rings so true.  The magic is in the matching the small with the big, so both will benefit.

 

Excerpted:  Breakthrough innovation – that is, innovation with potential to be a real game changer – can be exceedingly hard to achieve in a large, bureaucratic organization where people work in silos, have their own turf to protect and are wedded to the status quo.


Small companies can take risks that large companies can’t afford to take because the bigger entities have to protect and defend their established core business operations.  (DN:  I have als0 been reading and curating examples of larger companies cannibalizing their core operations to fund new ventures & innovations, so the examples are out there, especially in the fringes of big company ventures.)

 

The price of failure for the small, agile start-up is significantly less than that of a large corporation. At this level people tend to embrace risk, while the larger companies may have cultures that don’t support risk taking at all.


Smaller companies are often closer to the markets they serve than large corporations are to their markets. As a result, small companies can be effective in helping large companies obtain a better grasp of changing needs within a market and better insights into innovations that might meet those needs. Smaller companies may also have developed ties with sub-markets that corporations have not been able to reach. This again offers more opportunities for innovation.


Via Peter Verschuere
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN
Scoop.it!

Moving Beyond Surreptitious Manager Improv, Risk & Reward, Emerging Best Practice in your Org, Steve Leybourne

Moving Beyond Surreptitious Manager Improv, Risk & Reward, Emerging Best Practice in your Org, Steve Leybourne | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

"Managers improvise all the time, surreptitiously, outside of processes & strategies, in order to deal with compression of time & resources."  


How to make it work, Boston Univ.,  Asst. Professor views, referencing the financial industry.


My notes from the video:


Steve Leybourne covers the softer, challenging elements of work, confirming that more than ever, work is not predictable. It is doing too much, with too little, and so, managers improvise all the time, surreptitiously.  


Managers then work outside of processes, strategies, goals and plans, so there is risk.   Managers will this on your own, and expose themselves to failure.  If things go right, they will have an emerging best practice. But if they fail, then they are really exposed.    See the full Improvisation in Organizations video here.



________________________


Successful improvisation produces better ways of achieving tasks = emerging best practice.  -  Steve Leybourne, Asst. Professor, Boston University


________________________



The model pictured from the video features:


Three constructs: Creativity, Intuition & Bricolage (making the best of whatever resources you have at hand) from Moorman & Miner (1998.) They define improvisation as:
"the degree to which composition and execution converge in time."



Add in three more from their later research, Adaptation, Compression, Innovation (deviation from existing practices & knowledge) leading to Learning. Miner et. al. Minnesota (2001)


Leybourne lists these added three as outputs, which, in the model depicted lead to learning that is fed back into the process.   Adaptive routines are actually outputs to the next round of improvisations.


________________________


It is doing too much, with too little, and so, managers improvise all the time, surreptitiously.

________________________



He also covers what can go wrong in improvisation, how to build trust within a team to improvise, and dealing with ambiguity, poor specifications.


See the full Improvisation in Organizations video here.


Thanks to Sources:  Rutger Slump and Steve Leybourne,  guest speaker at de Baak about Improvisation in Organizations. He is a assistant professor at Boston University in Innovation and Entrepreneurship. letsplayinnovation.wordpress.com



more...
No comment yet.