Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend?
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Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend?
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...Innovation Will Have To Be 'Heart And Mind,' Or Nothing At All" ~ Dr Kobus Neethling

...Innovation Will Have To Be 'Heart And Mind,' Or Nothing At All" ~ Dr Kobus Neethling | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

In [Dr. Neethling's]  work in more than 30 countries and which spans two decades, he has witnessed an overbearing close-minded perspective on innovation---as if innovation is predominantly a discipline of ‘things’.
    
He goes on to say:
The shaping of a better planet for all of us is and will become even more complicated and unpredictable and therefore we will need a new kind of wisdom, courage and purpose-driven passion to innovate for the benefit of all.  


______________________
   
What's needed?  "Respect for and inclusion of ideas from every group affected by the innovation."

    

_____________________

      

....the groundbreaking innovations of the 20th century...served only the needs of a few. Naturally we have to continue our pursuit of cutting edge technology, ideas and systems. but the context in which these innovations take place, is and remains the fundamental issue.   

    

Of all the innovations ....the one that comes the closest to heart and mind innovation and the one that considered the context of the dramatic changes that the innovation would bring with immense sensitivity is the creation of a new South Africa.

     

In a television series that I wrote called ‘Creating a miracle’ I highlighted the critical factors which led to this unique societal innovation.

    

  • A rare integration of spiritual, creative and pragmatic leadership
  • A bringing together of opposite visions into a single shared vision
  • The creation of new symbols, values, attitudes, principles, customs and practices (and the letting go of the traditions, norms and conventions which would obstruct or frustrate the creation of a free and democratic society)
  • Respect for and inclusion of ideas from every group affected by the innovation
  • An extraordinary insight into the essence of the innovation that was required

      

As my mentor Paul Torrance said many times: “Creative people can perform miracles but they are always in danger of crucifixion”



Related posts by Deb:

        

      

          


Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Yes, it is time to, as Dr. Neethling says, elaborate on Aristotle: “Innovating the mind without innovating the heart is no innovation at all,” Lessons from a fully co-created innovation in South Africa has insights for us all.  

I became aware of Dr. Neethling's work through the whole brain assessment, the NBI.  I'm glad to see how much more there is to benefit us all.  ~  Deb

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People are Biased against Creative Ideas, Research Studies Find

People are Biased against Creative Ideas, Research Studies Find | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

The next time your great idea at work elicits silence or eye rolls, you might just pity those co-workers.

______________________________
    
"How is it that people say they want creativity but in reality often reject it?"
 

- Jack Goncalo, ILR School assistant professor of organizational behavior 

___________________________________

        

Fresh research (at the time - this is a post from 2011) indicates they don't even know what a creative idea looks like and that creativity, hailed as a positive change agent, actually makes people squirm.

    

"How is it that people say they want creativity but in reality often reject it?" said Jack Goncalo, ILR School assistant professor of organizational behavior and co-author of research to be published in an upcoming issue of the journal Psychological Science.

   

The paper reports on two 2010 experiments at the University of Pennsylvania involving more than 200 people.

     

The studies' findings include:

  • Creative ideas are by definition novel, and novelty can trigger feelings of uncertainty that make most people uncomfortable.
  • People dismiss creative ideas in favor of ideas that are purely practical -- tried and true.
  • Objective evidence shoring up the validity of a creative proposal does not motivate people to accept it.
  • Anti-creativity bias is so subtle that people are unaware of it, which can interfere with their ability to recognize a creative idea.



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    Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

    My original post on this topic migrated away with the shut-down of Posterous as of April 2013.   This is still important research to remember in 2013 >   Creativity can be hard to live with, work with, yet absolutely essential to assist change and innovation.


    "Don't think. Thinking is the enemy of creativity. It's self-conscious, and anything self-conscious is lousy. You can't try to do things. You simply must do things."  ~  Ray Bradbury

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    The Science of Success with Innovation Research

    The Science of Success with Innovation Research | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

    "She started her own creativity and innovation consultancy company to do what was NOT being done, – using academic research to improve innovation in companies"


    Amantha Imber wondered why the research she had read was not being applied to help firms innovate.


    What was the use of having a body of scientific research, including proven drivers to innovation, if it was not being used to help companies grow?


    “There was a gap between academic research and what happens ‘in the real world’,” she says.


    _____________________

    "..staff need to feel a sense of challenge. They also need to have the resources to deliver."

    _____________________

    Six years later the consultancy she founded, Inventium, is advising some of the world’s best-known corporations, including Coca-Cola Amatil, American Express, Qantas and Commonwealth Bank of Australia.


    Inventium won this year’s BRW Client Choice Award for best management consulting firm. The awards are run by Beaton and are based on responses from more than 40,000 professional services clients to ensure their independence.


    ...“People talk about trying to build a culture of innovation. From analysis we know what sorts of elements need to be present,” Imber says.

    “One of the most important is that staff need to feel a sense of challenge. They also need to have the resources to deliver.

    People need to feel that risk-taking is allowed and failure is not terrible, but rather an opportunity to learn.”


    She says there are keys to transforming ideas into realities.


    “Crush assumptions,” she says. “Whenever we set out to solve a problem, we have assumptions that fence in our thinking.


    By deliberately crushing assumptions and asking ‘What if the opposite was true?’ you can significantly increase your  creativity.”


    Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

    Quite the success story. Congratulations to Amantha Imber and the companies she's helped be successful. ~ Deb

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    How Leaders Lose Their Luck, the Paradox of the Journey to the Top

    How Leaders Lose Their Luck, the Paradox of the Journey to the Top | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

    While researching his forthcoming book — Heart, Smarts, Guts, and Luck — co-author Anthony Tjan made a fascinating discovery: a surprising number of company founders and business-builders attribute much of their success to luck.

    ...


    There are ways we create our own luck, as listed on the innovation leadership companion post on this curation stream.  Becoming disconnected, as Anthony describes, on the way to the top, is one way for leaders to lose their luck.


    Excerpted:


    Almost 25% of those we surveyed came out as "luck-dominant" on the Entrepreneurial Aptitude Test we devised; many more gave luck at least partial credit.


    ...Here's the paradox:  Once they have made it to the top — after they've reached high levels of entrepreneurial or corporate success — leaders often become disconnected from the crucial lucky qualities and relationships that helped get them there in the first place. By definition, the top is less of a journey and more of an arrival point. A newfound reputation is difficult to risk.


    We've identified seven attributes, and they are among the most difficult ones for leaders to master and maintain. They are: humility, intellectual curiosity, optimism, vulnerability, authenticity, generosity, and openness.


    The post defines these and begs the question:


    How do leaders reconnect to the reality, attitude, and relationships that can sustain and take their company's excellence to a new place?


    Author:  Anthony Tjan is CEO, Managing Partner and Founder of the venture capital firm Cue Ball and vice chairman of the advisory firm Parthenon.

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    Open Innovation & Organizational Boundaries, in Institutions, Will it Blend? — HBS Working Knowledge

    Open Innovation & Organizational Boundaries, in Institutions, Will it Blend? — HBS Working Knowledge | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it
    Open innovation, enabled by low-cost communication and the decreased costs of memory and computation, has transformed markets and social relations.


    As the authors illustrate, it will be challenging to manage contrasting modes of innovation, and that is exactly what is needed in organizations that expect to innovate and are systemically, culturally, not set up to help this happen. 



    Excerpts:

    Open innovation, in contrast to firm-centered innovation, is radically decentralized, peer based, and includes intrinsic and pro-social motives.


    The authors of this working paper use in-depth examples from Apple, NASA, and Lego to argue that open innovation will at least complement, if not increasingly substitute for, more traditional innovation modes.


    This is within the contexts of increasing modularity and decreased communication costs.   (DN:  Just look at digital communication today.  Think ahead 4 months to 1 year of what's next.)


    Emerging theories must be informed by these contrasting innovation modes and the implications for governance, incentives, intellectual property, managerial choice, professional and organizational identity, and organizational cultures.


    Key concepts include:


    • Leaders and senior teams can take advantage of contrasting innovation modes, paradoxical organizational requirements, and associated dynamic boundaries.

    .

    • Leaders need to execute strategic choices with the systems, structures, incentives, cultures, and boundaries tailored to open and firm-based innovation modes.
    .
    • Multiple types of boundaries will increasingly be employed to manage innovation, from traditional to complex intra firm boundaries (such as ambidextrous designs), to webs of interdependence with partners and potentially anonymous communities.
    .
    • Senior teams must build their capabilities to deal with contradictions as well as their organization's ability to embrance contradictions.  


    A link to the full working paper, downloadable by Assistant Professor, Karim R. Lakhani & colleague is here.


    Source:  Karim R. Lakhani is an assistant professor in the Technology and Operations Management unit at Harvard Business School.  


    This link was also recommended by Jeffrey DeGraff at the University of Michigan Ross School of Business, and I also think it's right on, even if the language is quite academic.  It will make you think about your institutional systems, and refresh your vocabulary.    ~  Deb

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    Leading Continuous Innovation INFOGRAPHIC: Culture, Fringe Experiments, Customer Immersion

    Leading Continuous Innovation INFOGRAPHIC: Culture, Fringe Experiments, Customer Immersion | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

    How can change leaders support high performance, innovative teams? The infographic below cites 10 innovation strategies.  This is close.  There will be more of these process charts and innovation graphics.  


    This one features:


    Step 2:  Working at the organization's edges, the fringe & close to customers I've heard Dr. Jeff DeGraff talk about fringe teams this year at the Michigan Ross School of Business.


    Step 3:  Culture that  supports experimentation, failure.  This is ubiquitous in mention, scarce in after-the-fact reporting.  Better known examples, 3M (Post-Its) and Google (Google Lab: Buzz, Wave, etc.)


    Step 6: Customer immersion, pain points


    Step 10:  Metrics, measures

     

    Sources include:  Christensen & Raynor, The Innovator's Solution: Creating & Sustaining Successful Growth, 2003  


    Note the continuous improvement language, adjusted slightly, a 'la W. Edwards Deming:  Ready, Aim, Fire, Adjust.  Like Plan, Do, Check, Act.


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    Innovation, Impact, Change Words: Enough Talk, More Do | The Nonprofit Quarterly

    Innovation, Impact, Change Words: Enough Talk, More Do | The Nonprofit Quarterly | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

    This matches my current experience.  Does it match yours in the fields of innovation and change leadership?

     

    Excerpt:  If you’re a nonprofit news junkie, you know it’s nearly impossible to go a day without reading or hearing the words “innovation” and “impact.

    "It’s little surprise, then, that collective eyes are beginning to roll when the terms innovation and impact are tossed around with little explication as to what they look like on the ground and within a more systematic framework. So, maybe it’s time to start putting our money where our mouths are and get serious about assessing what, exactly, is true innovation; and, most important, what are the kinds of innovation that lead to real impact—especially those that can be rigorously assessed and measured..."  Source:  @npquarterly 


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    Looks Promising! New Alzheimer’s treatment fully restores memory function

    Looks Promising! New Alzheimer’s treatment fully restores memory function | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

    Australian researchers have come up with a non-invasive ultrasound technology that clears the brain of neurotoxic amyloid plaques responsible for memory loss in Alzheimer’s patients.

        

    The research team reports fully restoring the memories of 75 percent of the mice they tested it on, with zero damage to the surrounding brain tissue. They found that the treated mice displayed improved performance in three memory tasks - a maze, a test to get them to recognize new objects, and one to get them to remember the places they should avoid.
         

    Alzheimer’s affects 50 million worldwide. A team from the Queensland Brain Institute (QBI) have come up with a promising solution for removing the defective brain beta-amyloid and tau proteins.
         

    Publishing in Science Translational Medicine, the team describes the technique as using a particular type of ultrasound called a focused therapeutic ultrasound, which non-invasively beams sound waves into the brain tissue. By oscillating super-fast, these sound waves are able to gently open up the blood-brain barrier, which is a layer that protects the brain against bacteria, and stimulate the brain’s microglial cells to move in. Microglila cells are basically waste-removal cells, so once they get past the blood-brain barrier, they’re able to clear out the toxic beta-amyloid clumps before the blood-brain barrier is restored within a few hours.

    Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

    I and the friends and families of those who know someone with Alzheimer's, estimated 50 million, hope this is true.  It could be the breakthrough we need with implications for huge change in the world.  ~  Deb

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    Richard Platt's curator insight, March 23, 2015 7:43 PM

    Very promising trials, now it will need to pass FDA testing, given that ultrasound has typically been shown to be non-invasive and generally harmless this does seem like something that is worth investigating.

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    Why Steve Jobs Never Listened to His Customers - Sheltered Innovation and Crowdsourcing

    Why Steve Jobs Never Listened to His Customers  - Sheltered Innovation and Crowdsourcing | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

    Does innovation require listening to your customers? Or is to better to ignore them?  "It's really hard to design products by focus groups. A lot of times, people don't know what they want until you show it to them."— Steve Jobs    Also:  What worked for Steve Jobs may not work for your company.

        

    The Benefits of Sheltered Innovation


    Multiple studies have shown that individuals have a tendency to produce the most novel ideas when working alone (as opposed to crowdsourcing ideas from an external group).


    • But can this focus on the internal creativity of teams really have a place in the business world?

    • Should customers be ignored?


    According to Mario D’Amico, senior VP of marketing at Cirque du Soleil, the answer is, well, maybe.


    ...was Jobs right or not?

    Many respected entrepreneurs would say that yes, he was right ... but only for theextremely unconventional and circumstantial situation that his company was in.


    ...understanding your customers’ wants is a pivotal part of growing your business—but doesn’t have to restrict your innovation.


    Read more:   https://www.helpscout.net/blog/why-steve-jobs-never-listened-to-his-customers/


    Related posts by Deb:


                      




    Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

    The Wisdom of Crowds has individual and collective component, when you dig down deep.  The JCPenney example cited in this story is also a good cautionary tale.  ~  D

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    Moving Beyond Surreptitious Manager Improv, Risk & Reward, Emerging Best Practice in your Org, Steve Leybourne

    Moving Beyond Surreptitious Manager Improv, Risk & Reward, Emerging Best Practice in your Org, Steve Leybourne | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

    "Managers improvise all the time, surreptitiously, outside of processes & strategies, in order to deal with compression of time & resources."  


    How to make it work, Boston Univ.,  Asst. Professor views, referencing the financial industry.


    My notes from the video:


    Steve Leybourne covers the softer, challenging elements of work, confirming that more than ever, work is not predictable. It is doing too much, with too little, and so, managers improvise all the time, surreptitiously.  


    Managers then work outside of processes, strategies, goals and plans, so there is risk.   Managers will this on your own, and expose themselves to failure.  If things go right, they will have an emerging best practice. But if they fail, then they are really exposed.    See the full Improvisation in Organizations video here.



    ________________________


    Successful improvisation produces better ways of achieving tasks = emerging best practice.  -  Steve Leybourne, Asst. Professor, Boston University


    ________________________



    The model pictured from the video features:


    Three constructs: Creativity, Intuition & Bricolage (making the best of whatever resources you have at hand) from Moorman & Miner (1998.) They define improvisation as:
    "the degree to which composition and execution converge in time."



    Add in three more from their later research, Adaptation, Compression, Innovation (deviation from existing practices & knowledge) leading to Learning. Miner et. al. Minnesota (2001)


    Leybourne lists these added three as outputs, which, in the model depicted lead to learning that is fed back into the process.   Adaptive routines are actually outputs to the next round of improvisations.


    ________________________


    It is doing too much, with too little, and so, managers improvise all the time, surreptitiously.

    ________________________



    He also covers what can go wrong in improvisation, how to build trust within a team to improvise, and dealing with ambiguity, poor specifications.


    See the full Improvisation in Organizations video here.


    Thanks to Sources:  Rutger Slump and Steve Leybourne,  guest speaker at de Baak about Improvisation in Organizations. He is a assistant professor at Boston University in Innovation and Entrepreneurship. letsplayinnovation.wordpress.com



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    Creating your Own Luck to Build a Successful Innovation Culture, the Innovator's Mindset

    Creating your Own Luck to Build a Successful Innovation Culture, the Innovator's Mindset | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

    "Is it a mindset of creating your own luck that sets innovative organizations apart?"


    Do the featured characteristics of innovative cultures in organizations follow the make-your-own-luck characteristics listed in this article?   See if you agree that it's about having a certain mindset translated to culture:


    Excerpted:


    ...Having a positive, innovator’s mindset actually CREATES success, and luck.


    In The Luck Factor (Miramax, 2003) professor Richard Wiseman, from the University of Hertfordshire, details his research providing the following insight – Luck (or success) comes to those who embrace and embody four essential principles:


    Creating luck by noticing and acting on opportunities,
    Expecting that one can create luck through perseverance,
    ‣ Making decisions which are informed by the well honed intuition, and
    ‣ Resisting the negative by finding and even creating the bright side of every situation


    The post author, Bradley Bendle, also cites several other recent innovation books including a model from Andy Stefanovich in Look at More (Jossey-Bass, 2011) and his five M’s framework (Mood, Mindset, Mechanisms, Measurement, Momentum.)


    Like other posts on his site, the post is rich in citations plus the author's own spin and distillation based on his innovation readings including his view of the Innovator’s Mindset as being comprised of following six reinforcing domains:


    1) Alertness
    2) Curiousness
    3) Willingness
    4) Joy
    5) Desire
    6) Drive



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    3 snapshots of Chinese innovation: GM, Semiconductors, AstraZeneca | McKinsey

    3 snapshots of Chinese innovation: GM, Semiconductors, AstraZeneca | McKinsey | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it
    Chinese innovation is evolving in diverse ways and at an uneven pace across a range of different industries.


    1) GM China president Kevin Wale explains the importance of team-based innovation efforts in China and describes GM’s rapidly growing Advanced Technical Center in Shanghai. He also observes that innovation in China’s auto industry is more about commercialization models than technical achievements.


    What China does better than any place else in the world is to innovate by commercialization, as opposed to constant research and perfecting the theory, like the West.


    When the Chinese get an idea, they test it in the marketplace. They’re happy to do three to four rounds of commercialization to get an idea right, whereas in the West companies spend the same amount of time on research, testing, and validation before trying to take products to market.


    2) The semiconductor industry is a powerful example of the tension surrounding China’s potential for innovation.  For two decades they have sought to create a more potent domestic semiconductor industry—with mixed results.


    3) AstraZeneca's R&D focuses on unique disease mechanisms in China.  Certain diseases have high prevalence and, in many cases, could have different populations or different disease etiologies, presenting a white space on which R&D innovation can focus.

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    The 2011 Global Innovation 1000: Why Culture is Key to Performance

    The 2011 Global Innovation 1000: Why Culture is Key to Performance | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it
    Certain companies succeed in producing innovative new products and services, and in so doing generate superior financial results.

    Our 7th annual Global Innovation 1000 study has consistently demonstrated that the success of these companies is not a matter of how much these companies spend on research and development, but rather how they spend it.

    This year, we took under consideration two particular qualities — strategic alignment and a culture that supports innovation — that truly innovative companies have put in place that allow them to outperform the competition.
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    America Falling Behind in Space Race & Innovation |

    America Falling Behind in Space Race & Innovation | | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it
    Fear is growing among some Americans that China may take ownership of the moon.

     

    China is racing ahead to build its first space station: a potential jumping off point for deeper space missions and a center for scientific research.

     

    Meanwhile Americans are dependent on other countries for access to the international space station.


    Fear is growing among some Americans that China may take ownership of the moon.

     

    ... with America’s space program in shambles while other nations build their programs up, America may lag behind in the race to dominate space and technology.

     

    The space program may seem trivial to some, but it goes hand in hand with being an economic leader.  It brings with it unparalleled innovation in high tech fields, and if we invest in that and ensure our domestic industries are protected, we can begin to rebuild our economic strength.

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