Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend?
3.3K views | +0 today
Follow
Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend?
Where innovation is happening beyond the stuff of small start-ups & tech companies. For the BEST of the BEST curated news in performance, change, agile learning, innovation, motivation and careers, SUBSCRIBE to REVELN.com/Tools/
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN
Scoop.it!

The Myth of Crowdfunding (or The Crowdfunding Hydra)

The Myth of Crowdfunding (or The Crowdfunding Hydra) | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

Judy offers an experienced note of caution against over reliance on any single element in such a critical area of your organization’s mission as its fundraising. After all, quite often if your fundraising fails, so does your mission.Sometimes it can feel like any problem we face today can be ‘solved’ by throwing the internet at it.

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Judy identifies aspects of the "bright and shiny object" effect of crowd-(insert the blank) - sourcing, funding, guessing, contributing, conversing.  Like the beasts in cave-paintings of old, the first blog posts, one can be nourished or devoured by the such objects of our attention.  ~  Deb

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN
Scoop.it!

A more united United States of America: Sally Kohn's liberal views on Fox News & Today | TED Blog

A more united United States of America: Sally Kohn's liberal views on Fox News & Today | TED Blog | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

Sally Kohn is both liberal and a lesbian -- and she worked at FOX News, contributing to the conservative network for three years. During that time, sparred with some of the most conservative minds on television.  In this TED talk, she gives a bold idea for pushing past political polarization.

She feels strongly that the only way to address the issues facing our country is to sit down and have a real conversation — no more talking past each other or walking out of press conferences.  


She comments:  If people come up to me on the street, it’s: ” I don’t agree with you but I really like you. You seem really cool, you seem fun, you seem nice.” And to me, that’s huge. That’s 90% of the way there. As opposed to, “Oh you’re another one of those crazy, angry [people].”


Her current articles for 2014 are listed on The Daily Beast. 

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

This 2013 article has lessons for our 2014 news and social media, which has all kinds of filter bubbles built into it.  For example, have your heard more about July 2014 Miley Cyrus' tattoo of her dog lately than about the recent July 4th gun violence in Chicago?  82 people were injured, of that 14 killed, yet few news organizations covered it in prime time compared to a star's tattoo.

If Sally was a token liberal at FOX news, her message is still getting out, via TED's blog, as well as her record of exposure at FOX.  

What do you think?   ~  D

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN
Scoop.it!

5 Ways to Bring Creativity Back to Your Culture

5 Ways to Bring Creativity Back to Your Culture | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it
All too often, entrepreneurs build companies that stifle the very creativity they need. Here's how to get that creative spark back.


Excerpted:  Four changes (of five) you can make today to bring creativity back to your culture.

       

Offer Unlimited Vacation

Offering unlimited vacation won't make people skip work every Friday or leave people hanging at deadlines. Instead, it will give them control to choose when they decide to work and when they don't. Although this may seem trivial, being able to choose means everything in a creative culture.

   

Ditch the Meetings

The worst part about meetings is that they're incredibly easy to add. Even if you make an agenda, the number will only go up as you grow in size. As a result, little creative thinking will get done during the day.

    

Nix Department Goals

Department goals often help managers more than employees. Generally, you'll end up wasting valuable hours setting new goals and then even more time asking why you didn't hit them.
 

Worse still, each department relies on resources they don't control and departments they're not a part of to reach their goals. This can result in teams signing up for work they were unaware of, which can lead to arguments about whose goals are more important.

      

Give Plenty of Feedback

...A lot of companies make feedback a formal process, waiting until the end of the month, quarter, or year to share how they actually feel.


Creative cultures thrive on timely, spontaneous feedback. Whether it's good or bad, feedback helps teams raise their own expectations. It's the fuel you need to ignite a creative culture. And who doesn't want one of those?

     

Read more here.



Related tools & posts by Deb:

     

  • Don't miss a thing by subscribing to Best of the Best news, taken from Deb's  NINE curation streams @Deb Nystrom, REVELN, featuring three gold award change-themed streams, shared once a month via email,  free here,via REVELN Tools.

     

    

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

I left off his "Let Employees Work Remotely" not because I don't believe it helps, it's just that it has been challenged because of the need to interact with others, examine blind spots, and building a culture does involve a certain amount of showing up.

~  Deb 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN
Scoop.it!

What Nassim Taleb Misses About Technology and Innovation

What Nassim Taleb Misses About Technology and Innovation | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

"What Nassim Taleb misses about technology and innovation is that its purpose is not to entertain the delicate tastes of the chattering classes, but to improve the lives of us all.  ...What’s more, most of technology’s black swans are positive ones."


Excerpts: The Usefulness Of Useless Things


What Mr. Taleb fails to understand is that technologists are supremely aware that most of their efforts will come to nothing


_______________________

What, I wonder, would Mr. Taleb make of Edison’s 9,999th try?


_______________________


...They are, in fact, searching out black swans (to use Mr. Taleb’s own parlance), in full knowledge that they will spend most of their time rushing up blind alleys.  


What, I wonder, would Mr. Taleb make of Edison’s 9,999th try?

The truth is that useless things often end up very useful indeed.  Modern information technology did not originate with engineers, but has its roots in an obscure academic crisis, whose major figures, such as Cantor, Frege, Russell, Wittgenstein, Gödel and others never dreamed that their work would have important practical consequences.


...What Mr. Taleb seems to miss is that these are ...people dedicated to following their dreams and willing to put their own skin in the game to do so.


What’s more, most of technology’s black swans are positive ones. 

As [Greg Satell] recently wrote in the Harvard Business Review, “Innovation is a particularly sticky problem because it so often remains undefined.”  You can’t simply focus on the technologies that are sure bets, but must take into account the entire matrix (pictured in the article, four quadrants.)

 

... the logical consequence of his argument) is that we should remain in the upper right quadrant, where both the problem and the domain are well defined and he would presumably assign the lowest value on basic research and disruptive innovation, which have no clear applicability.


Yet it is there that we break truly new ground.


Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

I've shared news about Taleb's perspective on Change Leadership Watch. It's now paired with this innovation perspective about the place of failure! a compelling view.  ~ D

more...
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, April 28, 2013 11:16 PM

This is a follow-up on the "Anti-Fragile" post below.  The author discusses failure is an important part of the process leading to success, as author Greg Satell explains via the nature of innovation.  


This seems to be a worthy new perspective and critique of Taleb's work, also listed in our Innovation and Institutions curation stream.  ~  Deb

Bill LeGray's comment, April 29, 2013 11:26 AM
Good thoughts verey deeply buried within the Social Media mileau. BUT not so deep I will not try to follow the Change Leadership Watch, and other excellent Forums provided by Scoop It. In fact, while quite broad, the entire Innovatioon and Institutions stream may be worth a look now and then. Deb; "Thanks for leading the way for creativity, process changes, and obtaining "better" innovations and institutions with more properly responsive institutional outcomes."
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's comment, April 30, 2013 3:37 PM
Thanks for the comment Bill. Best to you.
Scooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN
Scoop.it!

Warren Berger Tells How to Ask a ‘Beautiful Question’ - How to Amplify Innovation & Performance

Warren Berger Tells How to Ask a ‘Beautiful Question’ - How to Amplify Innovation & Performance | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

A More Beautiful Question by Warren Berger is about the importance of asking thoughtful, ambitious "beautiful questions"—the kind that can bring about change in the world around you.


How do you define a "beautiful question"?
 

Warren Berger:  The term is inspired by this line from the poet E.E. Cummings: "Always the beautiful answer who asks a more beautiful question."

The way I define a beautiful question in the book is: "An ambitious, yet actionable, question that can begin to change the way we think about something—and might serve as a catalyst to bring about change."


For example, when someone steps back and asks, Why are we doing things the way we've been doing them the past 20 years—what if we tried a whole new approach? That's a beautiful question.


- See more at: http://www.thedailybeast.com/articles/2014/03/08/warren-berger-tells-how-to-ask-a-beautiful-question.html#sthash.Y9LUzjHR.dpuf

Related tools & posts by Deb:

      

              

      

       

  • Are you local to SE Michigan?  Find out more about horse-guided leadership development sessions (no fee demos) for individuals by contacting Deb, after reviewing her coaching page here.

 

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

In the consulting world, it's shared that a good consultant knows how to ask good questions.  This article amplifies performance and innovation by interviewing the author about breakthroughs (the cell phone, the Internet), helpful organizations (The Red Cross, the Olympics) that started with a question.

So the weird, the unusual, the provocative can end up being the beautiful when it comes to a great, powerful question.  ~  Deb 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN
Scoop.it!

Disruptive Technology and Innovation Requires Change Management & New Talent Strategy

Disruptive Technology and Innovation Requires Change Management & New Talent Strategy | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it
HR professionals know that anything that causes business disruptions is certain to have implications for human resource management, including the growth of 3-D printing.


I admit I'm looking forward to it. I think the 3-D printer is such a disruptive technology that I want to be in on the fun.


______________________
   

...The teenager found the plans on the Internet. Imagine, open-sourced body parts!

    

______________________

   


The news reports range from 3-D printing an iPhone case to high-heel shoes, or models of body parts on which doctors can practice.


...my favorite use of the technology so far goes to a teenager who used a 3-D printer at a local library to build a prosthetic hand for a boy who was born without fingers. The hand opens and closes and can even hold a pencil. The teenager found the plans on the Internet. Imagine, open-sourced body parts!


Implications for HR leaders? 
  

McKinsey recently issued a report highlighting some of the business disruptions that are likely to result from this new technology.



______________________

   

... there may be very specific, and difficult to find, talent requirements for such a shift, and begin to devise a talent-development and sourcing strategy to meet the [need]

   

______________________

   

3-D technology  -- aka additive manufacturing -- is likely to accelerate product development.  ... Value may not come from manufacturing a product; it may come from being able to add uniqueness to the design alone.

   

  • Don't wait until someone tells you it might have an impact: Know the business well enough to raise the issue if no one has mentioned it already. 
     
  • Help the executive team consider the strategic implications of the technology and whether it can be leveraged to the business' advantage or whether the business needs to be prepared to meet new forms of competition.
    
  • Recognize that there may be very specific, and difficult to find, talent requirements for such a shift, and begin to devise a talent-development and sourcing strategy to meet the skilled-worker needs of a new manufacturing strategy.

 

Related tools & posts by Deb:

      

  • Stay in touch with Best of the Best news, taken from Deb's  NINE multi-gold award winning curation streams from @Deb Nystrom, REVELN delivered once a month via email, available for free here,via REVELN Tools.

          

    
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

This is a quality article emphasizing the need to be ready for adaptive change, perhaps fast.  As author Susan R. Meisinger suggests, be "not only be prepared to manage the change, ...be leaders within the organization in embracing and driving change."  I'd add, create a learning environment now with leadership at all levels to empower your ability to change together.  Share what's important to be ready.  ~  D

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN
Scoop.it!

Innovation vs. Measurement & Systems: Leadership Is Always The Key

Innovation vs. Measurement & Systems:  Leadership Is Always The Key | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

"Think of “win-lose” structures in incentives.  If you can only win if someone else loses, what are the odds of your developing a working relationship grounded in trust?"

Trust:

Strong leadership can recognize “win-lose” structures or norms and work to eliminate them.  It seems obvious that leadership drives trust, not systems.


_________________________

Without ...systems ...built to allow for ...individual and group failure, risk will always be a negative organizational value. 


_________________________


DIVERSITY:      . . . of people, points of view, ideas, ethics, and beliefs.  Diversity is what drives and powers iteration, constant challenge, testing, playing, and randomness. Strong leadership will drive (or diminish) diversity much more profoundly than will the most deeply embedded systems.  


RISK:     Risk tolerance and the attractiveness of rapid iteration are the hallmarks of innovative organizations.  Without operational systems that are built to allow for and to contextualize individual and group failure, risk will always be a negative organizational value.


...Should you be thinking a little more about how you encourage and foster strong leadership, and a little less about your systems of measurement and evaluation.?  You might be surprised by where this reflection will take you.

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

The venture capitalist who wrote this post has a view I share on putting measurement and evaluation within the right context, including a certain tolerance for enough risk-taking to help organizations be adaptive and "anti-fragile." ~  Deb

more...
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, July 5, 2013 8:29 PM

This is also shared here via Performance and Talent Development because of the theme of leadership above performance systems, and leadership to build an innovation, adaptive culture that trumps traditional measurement practices. ~  D

Scooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN
Scoop.it!

Industries Not Worth Saving - U.S. Whaling: An Innovation Story for Today, The Atlantic

Industries Not Worth Saving - U.S. Whaling: An Innovation Story for Today, The Atlantic | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

"An extinct business offers surprisingly current lessons about the triumph of technology, the future of work, and the inevitable decline of industries that might not be worth saving."


--------------------------------

...the vessel's technology had become so easy to maneuver, even an unwashed cannibal could use it.

--------------------------------- 


In context, consider the companion predatory for-profit higher education news - taking advantage of the GI bill for returning vets and producing, for some vets, what turns out to a worthless degree, with considerable debt, and slim job prospects.


Excerpts: 


BLUBBER!    Fat had never made a city so flush.

In the mid-nineteenth century, New Bedford, Mass., was the center of the whaling universe and the richest city per capita in the United States -- if not in the world, according to one 1854 American newspaper. The US whaling industry grew by a factor of fourteen between 1816 and 1850.


Innovations in winch technology made it easier to pull in or let out large sails, reducing the number of skilled workers needed to man a vessel.


...Winch tinkerings practically made the book Moby Dick possible. Melville could realistically populate his book with shady, far-flung, ragtag characters precisely because the vessel's technology had become so easy to maneuver, even an unwashed cannibal could use it.


Other featured innovations:

  • Americans sailed bigger and better ships, guided by smarter ocean cartography and more precise charts.
  • ...whale captains were innovators in employee compensation. 
  • ...tinkerings with harpoon technology led to the invention of the iron toggle harpoon, an icon of 19th-century whaling.


Decline wasn't in the rise of the oil/petroleum economy, it was:

  • US workers got too darn expensive, and other countries stole our share of the whale business.
  • Between the 1860s and the 1880s the wages of average US workers grew by a third, making us three times more expensive than your typical Norwegian seaman.
.
Click the title link for the full article.
more...
No comment yet.