Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend?
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Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend?
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Six Stages to Achieving a Big Data and Innovation Culture

Six Stages to Achieving a Big Data and Innovation Culture | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it
Companies are realizing analytics are actually at the center of their company, whereas before analytics was just at the edge. According to Bruno Aziza of SiSense, that’s having an impact.


Aziza’s credentials are robust. Prior to SiSense, he ran data analytics programs at Microsoft, Apple and Business Objects (now a SAP company). He is the co-author of two books in the business analytics space, one of them the best-selling tome, Drive Business Performance: Enabling a Culture of Intelligent Execution(Wiley, 2008).


 He is a fellow at the Advanced Performance Institute, an independent advisory group specializing in organizational performance, and he has over 12,800 Twitter followers at @brunoaziza.


Excerpts:


…there are six cultural stages, kind of like the five stages of grief, except that …the higher you go the better shape you’re in.

  

1) Increased Visibility > looking at data but not able to tell what the data is telling them.

  

2) Move Beyond Gut Feel > understand the data, apply judgment to it so you’re able to react to information faster than anybody else.

In these first two stages, the types of problems you’re trying to solve are backwards looking analysis. you’re building infrastructure so you understand where your data comes from and what happened yesterday.

   

3) Plan for Success > “Here is what success means.”

   

4) Execute on Strategy > align our strategy to our knowledge, our ability to adjust based on success or failure on certain actions. Very few companies are at this stage.

   

5) Power to Compete > you are able to compete, taking strategic market share from the market you’re in, or adjacent markets.

   

6) Culture of Performance >  which is more of the North Star rather than a place where you end up:  “Run it like you own it.”

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Some data driven, high performance companies may be over obsessed with data. The author describes six (6) stages of becoming, including "achieving a Culture of Performance as more of the North Star rather than a place where you end up." ~ D

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Scooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN
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Innovate like Intuit - Customer-centric, grassroots, connected

Innovate like Intuit - Customer-centric, grassroots, connected | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

"Innovation doesn't have to be hard to master - a great case study with Intuit, the customer-centric, grassroots innovative TurboTax folks."


It's inspiring to read how Intuit structures in ways to understand its customers, deeply.  We're TurboTax customers, by the way.


Excerpts:


To grow faster than your market, you need to create more value. The essential business challenge is to create better products, less costly solutions, or more effective internal processes that results in better, faster or cheaper service.


Sounds easy, but when you call that “innovation,” many companies freeze up.



One company that excels at listening is personal-finance software giant Intuit Inc. of Mountain View, Calif. The $4-billion-a-year maker of QuickBooks and TurboTax has grown on grassroots innovation.


When Intuit founder Scott Cook was developing the program that became known as Quicken, his sister-in-law phoned hundreds of consumers to find out what they liked and disliked about managing their personal finances.


Cook learned:


  • 80% of consumers resented the time and paperwork required, so he vowed his product would save customers time. 
  • Quicken took off because it was simpler and easier to use than its competitors (which Cook dubbed the “47th-mover advantage”).
Cook also started to follow customers home; he and other staffers would sit at consumers’ kitchen tables and watch them pay their bills. This passion for field research still thrives at Intuit.
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