Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend?
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Harvard Woman Demos 3D Printed Makeup, Industry Disruption In Mind

Harvard Woman Demos 3D Printed Makeup, Industry Disruption In Mind | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it
"We’re going to live in a world where you can take a picture of your friend’s lipstick and print it out," says the founder.


Grace Choi was at Harvard Business School when she decided to disrupt the beauty industry. She researched and realized that "The makeup industry makes a whole lot of money on a whole lot of bulls**t,"  Choi said at TechCrunch Disrupt this week.


"They charge a huge premium on something that tech provides for free. That one thing is color."


Color printers are available to everyone, and the ink they have is the same as the ink makeup companies use in their products. She also says the ink is FDA approved.

She demonstrated how it works, then brushed some of the freshly-printed makeup onto her hand. 

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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Choi shows just how susceptible the beauty industry is to disruption with her 3D printer and company, Mink.   As email and the internet disrupted the US Postal Service and the media industry, 3D printing attracts entrepreneurs who are ready to disrupt long standing, premium priced industries like beauty products.  ~  Deb

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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, May 6, 2014 4:10 PM

Choi shows just how susceptible the beauty industry is to disruption with her 3D printer and company, Mink.   As email and the internet disrupted the US Postal Service and the media industry, 3D printing attracts entrepreneurs who are ready to disrupt long standing, premium priced industries like beauty products.  ~  Deb

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The Professors, Yes, the MOOC Hype is Worth It: Disruption in Higher Ed

The Professors, Yes, the MOOC Hype is Worth It:  Disruption in Higher Ed | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

Professors were asked, do they believe MOOCs "are worth the hype." 79% said yes.


===


In the largest survey of instructors who have taught massive open online courses, The Chronicle heard from critics, converts, and the cautious.

 

Hype around these new free online courses has grown louder and louder since a few professors at Stanford University drew hundreds of thousands of students to online computer-science courses in 2011.


Since then MOOCs, which charge no tuition and are open to anybody with Internet access, have been touted by reformers as a way to transform higher education and expand college access.


Many professors teaching MOOCs had a similarly positive outlook: Asked whether they believe MOOCs "are worth the hype," 79 percent said yes.


Via Smithstorian, Deb Nystrom, REVELN
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, March 18, 2013 12:40 PM

There is some synchroncity here that this article is showing up while I'm listening to a professor at UM talk about Harvard choosing a MOOC for accounting for their entry level accounting (Brigham Young) and outsourcing professors.

Can paths to efficiency and worker health co-exist?

Professor:  Wally Hopp, Associate Dean for Faculty and Research Herrick Professor of Manufacturing, Ross School of Business   Positively Lean: A Path to Efficiency and Energization?


Examples:  Henry Ford, Joe at GM Powertrain, FelPro (300% ROI on Employee Benefits, no turnover > sold to Federal Mogul)


Key themes in the blend:

  • Share the gain
  • Appeal to pride
  • Cultivate a community
  • Pursue a higher purpose <motivation>  (Sugar water or change the world)

 

Apple >> Change the world

Patagonia  >> Corporate responsibility  (Don't buy what you don't need)
University of Michigan  Uncommon education for the common man  (President James Burrill Angell) 


Questions:

  • Is the key challenge aligning organization & employee benefits from efficiency gains?
  • Or is it cultivating a sense of higher purpose?
  • Or something completely different?    
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Ten (10) Tech Trends That Will Change 2013 Business, Innovation Opportunities

Ten (10) Tech Trends That Will Change 2013 Business, Innovation Opportunities | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

Excerpts from10 top technology trends that may shape your 2013 business creativity and innovation.


Excerpts:



1. Big data goes mainstream.


Paul Daugherty, CTO at Accenture, predicts that 2013 will be the year that many companies plunge into big data in a big way, which doesn't ensure success, notes M. Eric Johnson, director of the Center for Digital Technology at Dartmouth University.
   

"…we will continue to see a good deal of disappointment, …a lot of companies are clueless about how to unlock the value …in their data."

  
2. The digital enterprise emerges.
A confluence of technologies and systems is ushering in an era of digital acceleration. Clouds, mobile technology and social media increasingly make proprietary hardware and software platforms irrelevant.
   

Bill Briggs, global lead of Deloitte Digital and deputy chief technology officer for Deloitte Consulting. "There is an immense interrelationship among various digital technologies. They are profoundly reshaping business and creating enormous opportunities."
    

3. Social media gets sophisticated.

        
"…the combination of mobility, social and location-based services has the ability to transform the enterprise."

     

4. Clouds are everywhere.

   
"The cloud means that you can …create a sum greater than the individual parts, …[which] also translates into greater agility and flexibility."

    

5. IT stocks talent.

   
Organizations are loading up on IT talent and building centers of technology excellence to spur innovation.

   

…Last September, General Motors said that it plans to hire as many as 1,500 workers to staff a new computer technology center near Detroit. Other major companies have made similar announcements in recent months.

   
6. IT means business.

   
"We're at the point where you cannot separate business strategy from technology strategy," explains Deloitte's Briggs.  

"Siloed organizations cannot act in the highly agile manner that's necessary," Georgetown's Prashant warns. He says that organizations must create cross-functional teams and engage in practices that help IT and business executives become more fluent in each other's domains.

    

7. The post-PC era takes hold.  

   
"It's vital to deliver the full fidelity of services and offerings across mobile platforms," says David Reilly, managing director of Bank of America's Technology Infrastructure organization. 2013 will be a year in which IT executives must focus on creating a consistent experience across devices and browsers.

    

8. Consumerization rules.
Confront the bring-your-own-device (BYOD) movement and the consumerization of IT to support smartphones, tablets and other employee devices.

    

9. Organizations get serious about cyber-security.
Cyber-threats are increasing…Ernst & Young's Nichols says that organizations must examine security in a more holistic manner, including examining the cloud, partners and mobile systems.

The good news is that tools are becoming more sophisticated, and the coming year may be as a turning point.


10. Analytics is for everyone.

   

"We are quickly reaching a point of maturity…" …Analytics software is allowing more agile and effective decision making in business. This trend will continue to accelerate in 2013.

     

Read the full article here.


Photo credit: by UggBoy UggGirl - Flickr

    

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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:
  • Technology continues as an accelerator to business and a foil for creativity and innovation.  This is a great list to add to the trends cited in Change Leaders Watch.
         
  • It's also a good trend watch mix for what's next in our VUCA world  (Volatile, Uncertain, Complex, Ambiguous), although this list helps it be a tad less so.

   
~  Deb 

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Disruptive Technology and Innovation Requires Change Management & New Talent Strategy

Disruptive Technology and Innovation Requires Change Management & New Talent Strategy | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it
HR professionals know that anything that causes business disruptions is certain to have implications for human resource management, including the growth of 3-D printing.


I admit I'm looking forward to it. I think the 3-D printer is such a disruptive technology that I want to be in on the fun.


______________________
   

...The teenager found the plans on the Internet. Imagine, open-sourced body parts!

    

______________________

   


The news reports range from 3-D printing an iPhone case to high-heel shoes, or models of body parts on which doctors can practice.


...my favorite use of the technology so far goes to a teenager who used a 3-D printer at a local library to build a prosthetic hand for a boy who was born without fingers. The hand opens and closes and can even hold a pencil. The teenager found the plans on the Internet. Imagine, open-sourced body parts!


Implications for HR leaders? 
  

McKinsey recently issued a report highlighting some of the business disruptions that are likely to result from this new technology.



______________________

   

... there may be very specific, and difficult to find, talent requirements for such a shift, and begin to devise a talent-development and sourcing strategy to meet the [need]

   

______________________

   

3-D technology  -- aka additive manufacturing -- is likely to accelerate product development.  ... Value may not come from manufacturing a product; it may come from being able to add uniqueness to the design alone.

   

  • Don't wait until someone tells you it might have an impact: Know the business well enough to raise the issue if no one has mentioned it already. 
     
  • Help the executive team consider the strategic implications of the technology and whether it can be leveraged to the business' advantage or whether the business needs to be prepared to meet new forms of competition.
    
  • Recognize that there may be very specific, and difficult to find, talent requirements for such a shift, and begin to devise a talent-development and sourcing strategy to meet the skilled-worker needs of a new manufacturing strategy.

 

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  • Stay in touch with Best of the Best news, taken from Deb's  NINE multi-gold award winning curation streams from @Deb Nystrom, REVELN delivered once a month via email, available for free here,via REVELN Tools.

          

    
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

This is a quality article emphasizing the need to be ready for adaptive change, perhaps fast.  As author Susan R. Meisinger suggests, be "not only be prepared to manage the change, ...be leaders within the organization in embracing and driving change."  I'd add, create a learning environment now with leadership at all levels to empower your ability to change together.  Share what's important to be ready.  ~  D

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Why Apple, Academia, Tesla & VCs May Die, Disruption Guru Christensen Talks

Why Apple, Academia, Tesla & VCs May Die, Disruption Guru Christensen Talks | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

"Harvard business professor Clayton Christensen literally wrote the book on technology disruption...and he thinks Apple, Tesla Motors, venture capitalists and most of the nation’s colleges and universities should be afraid."

  

The author of The Innovator’s Dilemma said Wednesday that all of them could be killed by less advanced competitors in the same way that many once dominant technology companies have been in the past.

  

...He believes that and the commoditization of smartphones threaten Apple in the long run.

  

...“For 300 years, higher education was not disruptable because there was no technological core."

  

“But now online learning brings to higher education this technological core, and people who are very complacent are in deep trouble.'

__________________

    

...people who are very complacent are in deep trouble.

__________________


...“there is a different business model that is disrupting this in addition to online learning. It’s on-the-job education. ...you come in for a week and we’ll teach you about strategy and you go off and develop a strategy.  


...You learn it and you use it. These are very different business models and that’s what’s killing us.”

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

I've posted this to BOTH Change Leader Watch & here.  On the Innovations & Institutions stream, I'll be adding examples of organizations that are adapting to this disruption in academe and the other industries mentioned.  ~  Deb

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Marie Jeffery's comment, February 11, 2013 11:13 AM
KMInstitute.org
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's comment, February 17, 2013 4:30 PM
Thanks for your comments Marie. Knowledge Management is quite an industry, with various opinions of the traction it holds in business. I am most curious as to where it is headed.
Patrick J Scanlon's curator insight, March 12, 2013 5:58 PM

If you don't like change.  You will like irrelevance even less #media #higherEd #VC

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Why Innovation Dies, Disruption, not Deans: Higher Ed's long, winding Road to Online Education, Forbes

Why Innovation Dies, Disruption, not Deans: Higher Ed's long, winding Road to Online Education, Forbes | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

Here's the companion post to the previous article that features the long & winding road in dealing with online education, and confronts disruption head-on.


Author:  Steve Blank   Source:  http://www.forbes.com/sites/groupthink/2012/05/01/why-innovation-dies/2/

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