innovation creativity serendipity
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innovation creativity serendipity
innovation creativity serendipity
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Six ways to bring Agile Innovation into your company by Neil ...

So the great driver of innovation has been the historic increase in connectivity between us that creates infinitely more ...
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TED Curator Chris Anderson on Crowd Accelerated Innovation /via ...

I was the Chief Curator of the social initiative 30 Days of Creativity in 2010, where people were encouraged to create stuff, ...
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Steven Johnson's Where Good Ideas Come From: multidisciplinary hymn to diversity, openness and creativity

Steven Johnson's Where Good Ideas Come From: multidisciplinary hymn to diversity, openness and creativity | innovation creativity serendipity | Scoop.it
Science writer Steven Johnson's latest book, Where Good Ideas Come From: The Natural History of Innovation is, in some ways, a classic Johnson book: drawing from diverse sources across many disciplines, Johnson recounts historical scientific breakthroughs and draws from them parallels to modern technology, particularly networked computers and the way that they shape the societies around them.

But in another way, this is a very different kind of Johnson book. Unlike recent science histories like The Invention of Air or The Ghost Map, Johnson doesn't limit himself to a deep, biographical account of a single invention. Rather, Good Ideas is a sweeping survey of many, many inventions, some dating back to antiquity, and a comparison of these innovations to the innovations that occur on the grand scale -- in the natural evolution of new species and ecosystems -- and on the micro-scale -- the way that neuronal clusters alternate between synchronized, orderly firing and wild chaos to birth new ideas.

This is the heart of Johnson's thesis: that there are similarities to be found (and lessons to be learned) between the way that physics, chemistry and biology innovate to create successful variations in life; the way that humans work together to create successful new technologies; and the way that human brains accomplish the strange business of imagining new things, seemingly out of thin air.

For Johnson, the secret lies in the "thin air" -- the unplumbed space we credit for the "sparks of brilliance" and "happy accidents" that create new connections, strategies and thoughts. And for Johnson, this thin air is anything but: rather, it is a relatively predictable outcome arising from certain pre-conditions.

Wherever you have a lot of spare parts lying around, a lot of disciplines crossing paths, a reliable system for propagating good ideas, and an environment that doesn't unduly punish failed experiments or wall off certain areas of exploration lest they disrupt the status quo, innovation emerges. Working from a foundation of organic chemistry and the ways that complex carbon chains bootstrapped themselves into myriad combinations that built one upon another, on to organisms that co-evolve with their environments; and forward to inventions from movable type and double-entry bookeeping to GPS and Twitter, and finally to the cutting-edge neuroscience of idea formation, Johnson makes a convincing case that innovation is fractal.

That is, if you want to be innovative, you need to put yourself into innovative environments: places where lots of contradictory ideas from many disciplines are crossing paths, where institutions and governments don't over-regulate or conspire to crush new ideas; where existing platforms stand ready to have new platforms built atop them, as TCP/IP, SGML and various noodling experiments over many decades let Tim Berners-Lee invent the Web (itself a platform that many others invent atop of).

This is stirring stuff: a strong defense of open networks, shared ideas, serendipity (he even cites Boing Boing as a counter to doomsayers who say that the net's directed search creates a serendipity-free echo chamber) and minimal control over ideas so that they can migrate to those who would use them in ways their "creators" can't conceive of. These are axioms for many of us who grew up with the Internet and the Web, but to see these axioms defended with reference to history, paleontology, evolutionary biology, urban planning, and other diverse disciplines is heartening indeed.

It helps, of course, that Johnson is one of the field's most engaging writer, a science writer with a gift for narrative and clear examples (it probably also helps that I agree with him, of course!). But this is really one of those books you want to shove under the noses of everyone who's ever expected creativity in the least creative of environments, from bosses to politicians to teachers to urban planners, comprising a road-map for individuals, groups and societies to realize their best potential.

Where Good Ideas Come From: The Natural History of Innovation


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L'innovation toujours en panne dans l'Union

L'innovation toujours en panne dans l'Union | innovation creativity serendipity | Scoop.it
Technos et Innovations : Au moins, l'Europe ne se voile pas la face. Avec la publication de son nouveau tableau de bord l'Union de l'innovation (TBUI) 2010,... Sujets liés : Technos et Innovations - Presse en ligne de l'industrie
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A New Trait Theory: What Neurology Tells Us about Creativity And ...

A New Trait Theory: What Neurology Tells Us about Creativity And ... | innovation creativity serendipity | Scoop.it
The most intelligent person in the room is no longer the most powerful, for they are not always the most creative, and ...
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When Open innovation meets Rapid innovation | Rapid innovation in ...

When Open innovation meets Rapid innovation | Rapid innovation in ... | innovation creativity serendipity | Scoop.it
flexible, agile, open to new opportunities picked out from the innovation market, driven by “creative tension“, it has strong ...
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Jonathan Rosenberg: Rules to success

Jonathan Rosenberg: Rules to success | innovation creativity serendipity | Scoop.it
In his quarter century of working in Silicon Valley at such companies as Apple, @Home, and Google, CMC Alum Jonathan Rosenberg has had ample opportunity to watch successful people in action. He will share his observations on what makes great people tick and draw conclusions on how a liberal arts education can arm the next generation of leaders. His talk will include a set of "rules" that promise to be excellent preparation for any student who plan at some point to enter the real world.
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Innovate - US Zeitgeist 2010

Innovate - US Zeitgeist 2010 | innovation creativity serendipity | Scoop.it
Human beings are driven to create. How can we sponsor innovation in ourselves, and encourage it in others? Tim O'Reilly Founder & CEO, O'Reilly Media Jerry Yang Co-founder & Chief Yahoo, Yahoo! Steve Cousins President & CEO, Willow Garage Andrew Serwer Managing Editor, Fortune Magazine Thomas Tull Chairman & CEO, Legendary Pictures Ariel Emanuel Co-CEO, WME Entertainment Patrick Whitesell Co-CEO, WME Entertainment Find out more at: Zeitgeistminds.com
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What's the difference between creativity and innovation? - Kansas City Entrepreneurship | Examiner.com

What's the difference between creativity and innovation? - Kansas City Entrepreneurship | Examiner.com | innovation creativity serendipity | Scoop.it
Yesterday, I attended a Kansas City Chamber seminar.  This "Brain Food" event was called Creative Thinking and Innovation.  The event was a learning experience
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Do Distractions Make You More Creative? | Lateral Action

Do Distractions Make You More Creative? | Lateral Action | innovation creativity serendipity | Scoop.it
Creativity is a multi-faceted process, involving ideas, feedback and execution. Distractions are great for finding new ideas; ...
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Sylvia Sowa's curator insight, March 10, 2016 6:23 PM
For those who are absent-minded and distracted, as I am too!! 
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Reverse brainstorming: A better way to generate creative ideas ...

Reverse brainstorming: A better way to generate creative ideas ... | innovation creativity serendipity | Scoop.it
This post was mentioned on Twitter by Jorge Barba and Jorge Barba, paulo ganns. paulo ganns said: RT @jorgebarba: New blog ...
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Innovate, create | Harvard Gazette

Innovate, create | Harvard Gazette | innovation creativity serendipity | Scoop.it
Creativity and innovation come from being able to apply fresh insights to different contexts. To teach that, classes have to ...
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Front end of Innovation

Front end of Innovation | innovation creativity serendipity | Scoop.it
Involve customers in new ways. 4. Focus on the needs that customers don't express. 5. Seek ideas from new customer groups. 6. ...
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Connect Ideas, Don't Protect Them - Doug French - Mises Daily

Connect Ideas, Don't Protect Them - Doug French - Mises Daily | innovation creativity serendipity | Scoop.it
While there is the occasional Willis Carrier who singlehandedly conceived of a way to reverse the process of heating to create ...
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Innovation's New Champion | InnovationManagement

Innovation's New Champion | InnovationManagement | innovation creativity serendipity | Scoop.it
We know innovation depends on many different factors, all described in the many hundreds of books each trying to say what it ...
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The Next Big Thing in Managing Innovation - Henry Chesbrough - The Conversation - Harvard Business Review

The Next Big Thing in Managing Innovation - Henry Chesbrough - The Conversation - Harvard Business Review | innovation creativity serendipity | Scoop.it
Understanding the most important management innovations of the past will inform how we continue to expand and build on our knowledge to improve the innovation process in the future and advance human progress. So with a decade just ended, it is a good time to take stock of recent developments, and then look ahead to likely future management innovations.

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Directed Serendipity

Directed Serendipity | innovation creativity serendipity | Scoop.it
As each year goes by it gets tougher to buy Christmas presents, as you have to search harder for something original and at the same time desired. There is a strong parallel with Open Innovation (OI). You need to look harder and in new places to find new things. That’s where the concept of Directed Serendipity comes in. It simply means that to get lucky you need to be looking in the right places.
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WHERE GOOD IDEAS COME FROM by Steven Johnson

WHERE GOOD IDEAS COME FROM by Steven Johnson | innovation creativity serendipity | Scoop.it
One of our most innovative, popular thinkers takes on-in exhilarating style-one of our key questions: Where do good ideas come from? With Where Good Ideas Come From, Steven Johnson pairs the insight of his bestselling Everything Bad Is Good for You and the dazzling erudition of The Ghost Map and The Invention of Air to address an urgent and universal question: What sparks the flash of brilliance? How does groundbreaking innovation happen? Answering in his infectious, culturally omnivorous style, using his fluency in fields from neurobiology to popular culture, Johnson provides the complete, exciting, and encouraging story of how we generate the ideas that push our careers, our lives, our society, and our culture forward. Beginning with Charles Darwin's first encounter with the teeming ecosystem of the coral reef and drawing connections to the intellectual hyperproductivity of modern megacities and to the instant success of YouTube, Johnson shows us that the question we need to ask is, What kind of environment fosters the development of good ideas? His answers are never less than revelatory, convincing, and inspiring as Johnson identifies the seven key principles to the genesis of such ideas, and traces them across time and disciplines. Most exhilarating is Johnson's conclusion that with today's tools and environment, radical innovation is extraordinarily accessible to those who know how to cultivate it. Where Good Ideas Come From is essential reading for anyone who wants ...
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