Innovation and the knowledge economy
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Innovation and the knowledge economy
what is innovation? How are innovation and the knowledge economy related
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Civic NationVoice: Civics Unbound: Knowledge, Skills, And Dispositions For A Thriving Democracy

Civic NationVoice: Civics Unbound: Knowledge, Skills, And Dispositions For A Thriving Democracy | Innovation and the knowledge economy | Scoop.it

Higher education institutions across the United States are doing creative, painstaking, hopeful work to prepare students for lives of meaningful engagement in their communities and democracy. Typically the focus of these efforts is on developing the knowledge, skills, and dispositions students need to cast informed votes, deliberate about public issues, appreciate perspectives and experiences they may not share, and serve as responsible stewards and change-agents.

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Opinion | You Still Need Your Brain

Opinion | You Still Need Your Brain | Innovation and the knowledge economy | Scoop.it

Outsourcing knowledge to Google keeps you from learning things the right way. Most adults recall memorizing the names of rivers or the Pythagorean theorem in school and wondering, “When am I ever gonna use this stuff?” Kids today have a high-profile spokesman. Jonathan Rochelle, the director of Google’s education apps group, said last year at an industry conference that he “cannot answer” why his children should learn the quadratic equation. He wonders why they cannot “ask Google.” If Mr. Rochelle cannot answer his children, I can. Google is good at finding information, but the brain beats it in two essential ways. Champions of Google underestimate how much the meaning of words and sentences changes with context. Consider vocabulary. Every teacher knows that a sixth grader, armed with a thesaurus, will often submit a paper studded with words used in not-quite-correct ways, like the student who looked up “meticulous,” saw it meant “very careful,” and wrote “I was meticulous when I fell off the cliff.” With the right knowledge in memory, your brain deftly puts words in context. Consider “Trisha spilled her coffee.” When followed by the sentence “Dan jumped up to get a rag,” the brain instantly highlights one aspect of the meaning of “spill” — spills make a mess. Had the second sentence been “Dan jumped up to get her more,” you would have thought instead of the fact that “spill” means Trisha had less of something. Still another aspect of meaning would come to mind had you read, “Dan jumped up, howling in pain.” The meaning of “spill” depends on context, but dictionaries, including internet dictionaries, necessarily offer context-free meanings. That’s why kids fall off cliffs meticulously. Perhaps internet searches will become more sensitive to context, but until our brains communicate directly with silicon chips, there’s another problem — speed.

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In the knowledge economy, we need a Netflix of education

In the knowledge economy, we need a Netflix of education | Innovation and the knowledge economy | Scoop.it
With 4.6 billion pieces of content produced daily, it might seem that our hunger for knowledge should be satisfied — but information production and distribution is not the same as consumption and it’s not as simple as just putting information out there.

The problem is that we are drowning in content — but are starving for knowledge and insights that can help us truly be more productive, collaborative and innovative.

When we want to acquire useful knowledge, we have to search the web broadly, find experts by word-of-mouth and troll through various poorly designed internal document sharing systems. This method is inefficient.

There should be a better solution that helps users find what they need. Such a solution would adapt to the user’s needs and learn how to make ongoing customized recommendations and suggestions through a truly interactive and impactful learning experience.
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Content Curation: From Information To Knowledge [Video]

Robin Good: Start this video clip at 1':42" (up to 3':30") and you can get a pretty good idea of what a content curator does and why what he does has so much to do with sense-making, making things understandable for others and ultimately extracting contextualized "meaning" from information "as is".

 

Must-see. Excellent. 9/10

 

 

P.S.: Thanks to Howard Rheingold for spotting this clip and sharing it.

 

Original clip: http://youtu.be/A625Yh6v6uQ

 



Via Robin Good
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Robin Good's comment, July 23, 2012 1:15 AM
Thank you Beth.
janlgordon's comment, July 24, 2012 11:22 AM
Thank you Robin Good and Howard Rhinegold for bringing this to my attention, it's excellent!
Anne-Solène Loiseau's curator insight, October 30, 2016 2:45 PM
Excellente vidéo sur le concept mapping avec un exemple sur le cheminement de l'information à l'action (début à 1'42). Merci à Robin Good et Howard Rheingold pour le partage.