Innovation and the knowledge economy
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HarperCollins to Launch New Global Publishing System, Streamlining Worldwide Operations and Data | Digital Book World

HarperCollins to Launch New Global Publishing System, Streamlining Worldwide Operations and Data | Digital Book World | Innovation and the knowledge economy | Scoop.it

HarperCollins Publishers Invests in Global Publishing System -By integrating systems and assets across the globe, the new centralized system will provide the company with the long term infrastructure needed to maximize its extensive catalogue of books, e-books and apps. It will transform the way staff view, manage and share product information throughout the publishing lifecycle.

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Is scholarship a conversation?

Is scholarship a conversation? | Innovation and the knowledge economy | Scoop.it
“Conversation at Caffe Nero” by ktylerconk on Flickr
A few weeks ago I wrote that I was not too thrilled with the “threshold concept” theory underpinning the new ACRL information literacy framework.
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Where Do New Ideas Come From?

Where Do New Ideas Come From? | Innovation and the knowledge economy | Scoop.it

With close study, the genealogies of even the most original ideas can be traced
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How Student Makers Solve Real-World Problems - iQ by Intel

How Student Makers Solve Real-World Problems - iQ by Intel | Innovation and the knowledge economy | Scoop.it
Student makers tackle real-world challenges with Maker Share missions, creating innovative tech solutions driven by hands-on learning and a passion to make a difference.

Whenever teenager Hannah Edge suffered an asthma attack, it often resulted in a trip to the emergency room for a spirometry test. The bulky diagnostic machine, which tests lung function, always helped her recover. She wondered if she could build a small portable measuring device that she could use at home, something that could also help other asthma patients avoid regular trips to the hospital.

Edge embodies the creative and problem-solving spirit of the maker movement. At only age 15, she founded SpiroEdge, a start-up medical device company. Her portable lung function analyzer could potentially help patients who suffer from asthma, a respiratory condition that affects 25 million people in the U.S.
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Facebook Built Its Vision of Democracy on Bad Data

Facebook Built Its Vision of Democracy on Bad Data | Innovation and the knowledge economy | Scoop.it
Mark Zuckerberg argues that more information reaching more people enhances democracy. But, as the adage goes, quantity does not equal quality.
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Blockchain in Education

Presentation of the European Commission's JRC report on blockchain in education focusing on digital accreditation of learning. Groningen, 5th September 2017

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To be creative, learn these seven stages of creativity

To be creative, learn these seven stages of creativity | Innovation and the knowledge economy | Scoop.it

Art is hard. Creative insights are hard to predict, and just when it gets difficult, your mind immediately jumps to a distraction: something easier to do, an excuse, a scapegoat.
To get the most out of your creative energy, carve out space for creative work. To make that space, you need to make space for the other types of work, too. The key to this is understanding how creative insights happen.
The four “stages of control” that build creative insights

In 1891, German scientist Hermann von Helmholtz—whose accomplishments included inventing the ophthalmoscope—was honored with a party for his 70th birthday. He got up to make a speech, and shared how he achieved his creative insights:
Often … [ideas] arrived suddenly, without any effort on my part, like an inspiration.… They never came to a fatigued brain and never at the writing desk. It was always necessary, first of all, that I should have turned my problem over on all sides to such an extent that I had all its angles and complexities “in my head.” … Then … there must come an hour of complete physical freshness and quiet well-being, before the good ideas arrived. Often they were there in the morning when I first awoke.… But they liked especially to make their appearance while I was taking an easy walk over wooded hills in sunny weather.
Thirty-five years later, social psychologist Graham Wallas cited Helmholtz’s speech, and proposed four “stages of control”: Preparation, Incubation, Illumination, and Verification.
During Preparation, you’re learning everything you can about the problem, or, as Helmholtz would say you’ve “turned [the] problem over on all sides” so that everything about it is “in [your] head.”
During Incubation, you’re allowing your unconscious mind to work on the problem. It happens while you’re “taking an easy walk over wooded hills,” or while you’re sleeping. Whatever you do to achieve “complete physical freshness and quiet well-being.”
When Illumination happens, the solution comes to you. As Helmholtz said, it doesn’t tend to happen while you’re sitting at your desk. It might be when you’ve just woken up.
During Verification, you ensure that the idea meets up to your standards. Does it solve the problems you identified during the Preparation stage?
These four stages have been cited in thousands of research papers on creativity. As neuroscientists Mark Beeman and John Kounios wrote in their book The Eureka Factor, Helmholtz’s observations still stand up more than 120 years later.

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Which Anonymous Sources Are Worth Paying Attention To?

Which Anonymous Sources Are Worth Paying Attention To? | Innovation and the knowledge economy | Scoop.it

So you wake up one day, get on Twitter and find everyone buzzing about some story in The New York Times or The Washington Post about some associate or friend of President Trump’s who has some connection to Russia. You read the story, but not only are the sources unnamed, they are unnamed in all kinds of different ways — an “intelligence source” in paragraph three, “administration officials” in paragraph seven, “people familiar with the investigation” in the next one and “law enforcement officials” at the end. You understand all the words on the screen, but you don’t really understand who’s telling you what or why.

In the first part of our guide to unnamed sources, we laid out some general tips for making sense of these kinds of stories. In this part, we want to get more specific, to help you to essentially decode these stories. We also want you to be able to know which stories you should rely on based on the different kinds of sourcing used.

So we’re going to divide anonymous sources into six general types and give the pros and cons of each, in terms of reliability. We ordered the types of unnamed sources, roughly speaking, from most reliable to least reliable (at least in my experience)

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In the knowledge economy, we need a Netflix of education

In the knowledge economy, we need a Netflix of education | Innovation and the knowledge economy | Scoop.it
With 4.6 billion pieces of content produced daily, it might seem that our hunger for knowledge should be satisfied — but information production and distribution is not the same as consumption and it’s not as simple as just putting information out there.

The problem is that we are drowning in content — but are starving for knowledge and insights that can help us truly be more productive, collaborative and innovative.

When we want to acquire useful knowledge, we have to search the web broadly, find experts by word-of-mouth and troll through various poorly designed internal document sharing systems. This method is inefficient.

There should be a better solution that helps users find what they need. Such a solution would adapt to the user’s needs and learn how to make ongoing customized recommendations and suggestions through a truly interactive and impactful learning experience.
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Open Textbook Library - Web Literacy for Student Fact-Checkers

Open Textbook Library - Web Literacy for Student Fact-Checkers | Innovation and the knowledge economy | Scoop.it
download in different formats!

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
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Wikipedia’s founder wants to fix fake news

Wikipedia’s founder wants to fix fake news | Innovation and the knowledge economy | Scoop.it
Can a cadre of professional journalists, edited by volunteers and paid via crowdfunding, crack a problem that’s plaguing the Internet?
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A First Look at the Essential Phone, Andy Rubin’s Anti-iPhone

A First Look at the Essential Phone, Andy Rubin’s Anti-iPhone | Innovation and the knowledge economy | Scoop.it
ANDY RUBIN WASN’T ready to retire when he left Google in 2014. He certainly could have: After an illustrious career developing some of the most innovative products in tech, he had all the wealth and accolades anyone could want. As an engineer at the Apple spinoff General Magic, he built some of the world’s first internet-connected portable devices. As CEO at Danger, he created the Sidekick, a smartphone that defined the category before anyone had invented the term. And then, of course, Rubin created Android, the operating system found in more than two billion phones, televisions, cars, and watches.

But Rubin wasn’t done. More to the point, he couldn’t be done.
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Daryl Bem Proved ESP Is Real. Which Means Science Is Broken.

Daryl Bem Proved ESP Is Real. Which Means Science Is Broken. | Innovation and the knowledge economy | Scoop.it

it seemed obvious, at first, that Jade Wu was getting punked. In the fall of 2009, the Cornell University undergraduate had come across a posting for a job in the lab of one of the world’s best-known social psychologists. A short while later, she found herself in a conference room, seated alongside several other undergraduate women. “Have you guys heard of extrasensory perception?” Daryl Bem asked the students. They shook their heads.

While most labs in the psych department were harshly lit with fluorescent ceiling bulbs, Bem’s was set up for tranquility. A large tasseled tapestry stretched across one wall, and a cubicle partition was draped with soft, black fabric. It felt like the kind of place where one might stage a séance.

“Well, extrasensory perception, also called ESP, is when you can perceive things that are not immediately available in space or time,” Bem said. “So, for example, when you can perceive something on the other side of the world, or in a different room, or something that hasn’t happened yet.”

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John Oliver pleads with viewers to revive net neutrality fight

John Oliver pleads with viewers to revive net neutrality fight | Innovation and the knowledge economy | Scoop.it
The net neutrality fight is unfortunately back, and just as he did three years ago, comedian John Oliver has devoted a segment of his show Last Week Tonight to call out the importance of th
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A threat to innovation and knowledge society
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Wat betekent doodsangst voor een algoritme? - Frankwatching

Wat betekent doodsangst voor een algoritme? - Frankwatching | Innovation and the knowledge economy | Scoop.it
AlphaGo Zero toont aan hoe ver artificial intelligence is. In deze column lees je waarom het nog niet kan tippen aan de berggeit.
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Moeite met het stimuleren van innovatie? - ManagementSite

Moeite met het stimuleren van innovatie? - ManagementSite | Innovation and the knowledge economy | Scoop.it

‘Good artists borrow, great artists steal’, is een bekende uitspraak van Pablo Picasso. De Spaanse schilder en beeldhouwer, was altijd heel duidelijk over hoe goede kunst tot stand moest komen. Hij beging echter nooit de fout om zomaar kunst van zijn tijdgenoten over te nemen. De Spanjaard nam vooral onderdelen over van kunstobjecten, die ver buiten zijn eigen werkterrein lagen. Zo liet hij zich bij het maken van het schilderij Les Demoiselles d’Avignon, sterk beïnvloeden door Afrikaanse kunst. Maskers uit dat continent, waren een belangrijke inspiratiebron voor de totstandkoming van dit werk. Nu wordt het gezien als een van de meest baanbrekende schilderijen uit de kunstgeschiedenis.

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It's now tougher (and more expensive) to find big ideas - Futurity

It's now tougher (and more expensive) to find big ideas - Futurity | Innovation and the knowledge economy | Scoop.it

Big ideas are getting harder and harder to find, and innovations have become increasingly massive and costly endeavors, according to new research.

As a result, tremendous continual increases in research and development will be needed to sustain even today’s low rate of economic growth.

This means modern-day inventors—even those in the league of Steve Jobs—will have a tough time measuring up to the productivity of the Thomas Edisons of the past.

Nicholas Bloom, senior fellow at the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research and coauthor of a paper released this week by the National Bureau of Economic Research, contends that so many game-changing inventions have appeared since World War II that it’s become increasingly difficult to come up with the next big idea.

The thought now of somebody inventing something as revolutionary as the locomotive on their own is inconceivable,” Bloom says.

“It’s certainly true if you go back one or two hundred years, like when Edison invented the light bulb,” he says. “It’s a massive piece of technology and one guy basically invented it. But while we think of Steve Jobs and the iPhone, it was a team of dozens of people who created the iPhone.


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Facebook’s open source React library is increasingly worrying devs

Facebook’s open source React library is increasingly worrying devs | Innovation and the knowledge economy | Scoop.it
Should developers be afraid of Zuckerbergs bearing gifts?
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Developers do need to be worried.
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Association of European Research Libraries (LIBER) Publishes Five Principles for Negotiations with Publishers Re: Open Access

Association of European Research Libraries (LIBER) Publishes Five Principles for Negotiations with Publishers Re: Open Access | Innovation and the knowledge economy | Scoop.it
From the Association of European Research Libraries (LIBER): The principles are based on the experiences of LIBER libraries in the past two years, and aim to guide libraries and consortia as they shift from a reader-pays model (subscription licensing) to an author-pays model based on Articl
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Drukker uit Oldenzaal komt met unieke prijscalculator - blokboek.com

Drukker uit Oldenzaal komt met unieke prijscalculator - blokboek.com | Innovation and the knowledge economy | Scoop.it
Drukker uit Oldenzaal komt met unieke prijscalculator
aug 17, 2017 | Posted by Rob van den Braak | Zakelijk Nieuws
Online drukkerij ZoGedrukt.nl biedt de klant de mogelijkheid om direct een totaalprijs te berekenen voor een specifieke digitale drukopdracht. Met de ontwikkeling van de unieke tool PrintCalc kan een digitale drukopdracht direct worden berekend. Hiermee onderscheidt de drukker uit Oldenzaal zich van de overige online drukkers, en biedt hiermee nog meer service aan klanten.
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Revisiting Two Perspectives on Library-based University Presses - The Scholarly Kitchen

Revisiting Two Perspectives on Library-based University Presses - The Scholarly Kitchen | Innovation and the knowledge economy | Scoop.it

Two posts from 2013, each taking different points of view on partnerships and collaborations between university presses and university libraries. The first, by Joe Esposito, was titled Having Relations with the Library: A Guide for University Presses. The second, written in response, is from Rick Anderson, titled Another Perspective on Library-Press “Partnerships“.

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The World May Be Headed for a Fragmented ‘Splinternet’

The World May Be Headed for a Fragmented ‘Splinternet’ | Innovation and the knowledge economy | Scoop.it
The rulings on online speech are coming down all over the world. Most recently, on June 30, Germany passed a law that orders social media companies operating in the country to delete hate speech within 24 hours of it being posted, or face fines of up to $57 million per instance. That came two days after a Canada Supreme Court ruling that Google must scrub search results about pirated products. And in May a court in Austria ruled that Facebook must take down specific posts that were considered hateful toward the country’s Green party leader. Each of those rulings mandated that companies remove the content not just in the countries where it was posted, but globally. Currently, in France, the country’s privacy regulator is fighting Google in the courts to get the tech giant to apply Europe’s “right to be forgotten” laws worldwide. And, around the world, dozens of similar cases are pending.

The trend of courts applying country-specific social media laws worldwide could radically change what is allowed to be on the internet, setting a troubling precedent. What happens to the global internet when countries with different cultures have sharply diverging definitions of what is acceptable online speech? What happens when one country's idea of acceptable speech clashes with another's idea of hate speech? Experts worry the biggest risk is that the whole internet will be forced to comport with the strictest legal limitations.

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The Master Networker Will Connect You Now | Backchannel

The Master Networker Will Connect You Now | Backchannel | Innovation and the knowledge economy | Scoop.it
In contrast, The Kairos Society is a chameleon, able to adopt the most helpful traits of accelerators and incubators and dispense with the rest. Its founders are selected from among the same group of young people who are attracted to the contemporary Gold Rush of the tech industry explosion. To these charges, the Kairos Society is a network builder, cheerleader, problem solver—some of the classic tenets of incubators. But it hasn’t asked for equity. It hasn’t demanded a months-long exclusive commitment. It hasn’t promised real estate. And it definitely would not call itself an incubator. So far, it's just offered help.
Thus, in an environment where time and attention are the chief constraints, Kairos has managed to win both from many of the most elite young entrepreneurs—the same 20-somethings who become Thiel Fellows and complete Y Combinator. Kairos’s first fellows now include accomplished alumni like Kayvon Beykpour, who sold Periscope to Twitter, or Riley Ennis, a cofounder of Freenome, the liquid biopsy company that just raised $65 million from Andreessen Horowitz. Says Ennis: “What I liked about Kairos was that they had strong relationships with biotech and pharma companies. That industry is very hard to break into.” He adds: “Ankur was so helpful in making connections, teaching, mentoring, pushing you to think bigger, for no gain.”
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Opinion | You Still Need Your Brain

Opinion | You Still Need Your Brain | Innovation and the knowledge economy | Scoop.it

Outsourcing knowledge to Google keeps you from learning things the right way. Most adults recall memorizing the names of rivers or the Pythagorean theorem in school and wondering, “When am I ever gonna use this stuff?” Kids today have a high-profile spokesman. Jonathan Rochelle, the director of Google’s education apps group, said last year at an industry conference that he “cannot answer” why his children should learn the quadratic equation. He wonders why they cannot “ask Google.” If Mr. Rochelle cannot answer his children, I can. Google is good at finding information, but the brain beats it in two essential ways. Champions of Google underestimate how much the meaning of words and sentences changes with context. Consider vocabulary. Every teacher knows that a sixth grader, armed with a thesaurus, will often submit a paper studded with words used in not-quite-correct ways, like the student who looked up “meticulous,” saw it meant “very careful,” and wrote “I was meticulous when I fell off the cliff.” With the right knowledge in memory, your brain deftly puts words in context. Consider “Trisha spilled her coffee.” When followed by the sentence “Dan jumped up to get a rag,” the brain instantly highlights one aspect of the meaning of “spill” — spills make a mess. Had the second sentence been “Dan jumped up to get her more,” you would have thought instead of the fact that “spill” means Trisha had less of something. Still another aspect of meaning would come to mind had you read, “Dan jumped up, howling in pain.” The meaning of “spill” depends on context, but dictionaries, including internet dictionaries, necessarily offer context-free meanings. That’s why kids fall off cliffs meticulously. Perhaps internet searches will become more sensitive to context, but until our brains communicate directly with silicon chips, there’s another problem — speed.

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Could your next peer review be done by ... a robot?

Could your next peer review be done by ...  a robot? | Innovation and the knowledge economy | Scoop.it
Peer review is an integral part of scientific publishing.

It is a process whereby experts from a particular field evaluate the work done by a researcher in the same discipline.

Peer review was established to ensure scientific accuracy, credibility of the claims and research methods, to maintain standards, and enhance the quality of manuscripts.

Another important role of peer review is to ensure the manuscript is suitable for the intended journal and identify new pathways for future research.

In its early days, it took the form of a friendly scientific face-to-face or mail exchange. In time, it evolved into an official and rigorous process that evaluates scientific knowledge.
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What an academic hoax can teach us about journalism in the age of Trump

What an academic hoax can teach us about journalism in the age of Trump | Innovation and the knowledge economy | Scoop.it

From the “hermeneutics of quantum gravity” to the “conceptual penis,” attempted hoaxes tell us that our contemporary problems around truth are both cultural and structural.

Call it, if you like, a replication experiment. Twenty-one years ago, the New York University physicist Alan Sokal attempted to prove that the influence of postmodern ways of thinking in the humanities had reached the point where academic nonsense was indistinguishable from academic sense. As a physicist, Sokal found writing about science to be particularly offensive, and he submitted a “hoax” paper to the important academic journal Social Text titled “Transgressing the Boundaries: Towards a Transformative Hermeneutics of Quantum Gravity.” Sokal was conducting an experiment to see if “a leading North American journal of cultural studies — whose editorial collective includes such luminaries as Fredric Jameson and Andrew Ross — [would] publish an article liberally salted with nonsense if (a) it sounded good and (b) it flattered the editors’ ideological preconceptions.” They did.

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Session with Jimmy Wales - Quora

Session with Jimmy Wales - Quora | Innovation and the knowledge economy | Scoop.it
How is WikiTribune different from other news platforms?
 
Jimmy Wales, worked at Wikimedia Foundation
Answered Thu
I would say that there are two essential differences that WikiTribune has to distinguish it from most other platforms.First, we will have paid professional journalists working side-by-side with community members as equals. This means that staff journalists may be doing interviews, research, fact-checking, editing, planning alongside community members at every step of the way. I don’t think anyone has really attempted this exact thing before, and I hope that my long experience with wikis gives me some good ideas about how to make this work.Second, we are launching without advertising, and ye... (more)
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