Innovation and the knowledge economy
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MVO Nederland start Expeditie Sociale Innovatie Topsectoren | MVO Nederland

MVO Nederland start Expeditie Sociale Innovatie Topsectoren | MVO Nederland | Innovation and the knowledge economy | Scoop.it

12 bedrijven die met elkaar de diepte ingaan, praktische kennis opdoen en ervaringen uitwisselen, een halfjaar lang: dat is de Expeditie Sociale Innovatie Topsectoren. Vanaf vandaag kunnen ondernemers en managers zich inschrijven. Het traject gaat van start in januari 2013. Sectormanager bij MVO Nederland Michela van Kampen legt uit wat deze expeditie zo bijzonder maakt.

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Is scholarship a conversation?

Is scholarship a conversation? | Innovation and the knowledge economy | Scoop.it
“Conversation at Caffe Nero” by ktylerconk on Flickr
A few weeks ago I wrote that I was not too thrilled with the “threshold concept” theory underpinning the new ACRL information literacy framework.
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History of Machine Learning – Bloombench – Medium

Machine Learning…Artificial Intelligence…Data mining..Data Science….Data Analytics..

Well, if you are even remotely related to the technological field, chances are you may be aware of the world going gaga over these buzzwords. Though these different buzzwords are being used in a multitude of diverse application areas, at the core, they all mean the same thing — making sense of vast amounts of data in a way that would give out some intelligence to act upon.

Although Machine Learning has now gained prominence owing to the exponential rate of data generation and technological advancements to support it, its roots lie way back in 17th century. People have been attempting to make sense of data and processing it to gain quick insights since ages.

Let me take you through an interesting journey down the history of Machine Learning — how it all began and how did it come to what it is today.


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10 predictions for deep learning in 2018

10 predictions for deep learning in 2018 | Innovation and the knowledge economy | Scoop.it
I’ve got this ominous feeling that 2018 could be the year that everything changes dramatically. The incredible breakthroughs we saw in 2017 for deep learning will carry over in a very powerful way in 2018. A lot of work coming from 2017’s research will migrate into everyday software applications.
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5M€ in prizes for social innovations using Blockchains for social good

5M€ in prizes for social innovations using Blockchains for social good | Innovation and the knowledge economy | Scoop.it
The European Commission has launched a new Horizon Prize: 'Blockchains for Social Good'. 5 prizes of EUR 1 million each will be awarded to innovators that use Blockchain technology to develop decentralized solutions bringing about positive social change.
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Here's how to keep kids learning outside of the classroom

Here's how to keep kids learning outside of the classroom | Innovation and the knowledge economy | Scoop.it
Every year, a child lives 8,760 hours (that’s 24 hours times 365 days). Let’s say she sleeps 9 hours a night. That leaves 5,475 hours awake. How many of those does she spend in school? Official compulsory instructional time for primary school ranges from under 600 hours (Russia) to nearly 1,200 hours (Costa Rica) in the OECD database. Actual days may be significantly fewer with school closures and teacher absenteeism. In many low- and middle-income countries, school days are at the low end of that due to short school days. That means that only between 10 and 20 percent of children’s waking hours are spent in school [1].

At the same time, the World Development Report 2018 argues convincingly that there is a global learning crisis, with too many children failing to learn foundational skills – like functional reading – in school [2]. Clearly there is a need to improve the quality of schooling. But at the same time, why not leverage those other 80 to 90 percent of waking hours?

One way that parents try to use those extra hours is by paying for out-of-school tutoring. This is prevalent in many countries. But because parents pay for private tutoring, it creates a particular burden on the poorest children and their families. And some evidence suggests that it may create disincentives to teach during the school day (since teachers themselves are often tutors), as in Jayachandran (2014).
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Open-access books are downloaded, cited, and mentioned more than non-OA books

Open-access books are downloaded, cited, and mentioned more than non-OA books | Innovation and the knowledge economy | Scoop.it
Open-access journal articles have been found, to some extent, to be downloaded and cited more than non-OA articles. But could the same be true for books? Carrie Calder reports on recent research in…
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10 Most Innovative startups in India that will rule in 2018 and beyond - KnowStartup

10 Most Innovative startups in India that will rule in 2018 and beyond - KnowStartup | Innovation and the knowledge economy | Scoop.it

Very few startups have the potential to become big businesses. There are also very few with innovative ideas. Here are 10 Most Innovative startups

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Wat betekent doodsangst voor een algoritme? - Frankwatching

Wat betekent doodsangst voor een algoritme? - Frankwatching | Innovation and the knowledge economy | Scoop.it
AlphaGo Zero toont aan hoe ver artificial intelligence is. In deze column lees je waarom het nog niet kan tippen aan de berggeit.
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Moeite met het stimuleren van innovatie? - ManagementSite

Moeite met het stimuleren van innovatie? - ManagementSite | Innovation and the knowledge economy | Scoop.it

‘Good artists borrow, great artists steal’, is een bekende uitspraak van Pablo Picasso. De Spaanse schilder en beeldhouwer, was altijd heel duidelijk over hoe goede kunst tot stand moest komen. Hij beging echter nooit de fout om zomaar kunst van zijn tijdgenoten over te nemen. De Spanjaard nam vooral onderdelen over van kunstobjecten, die ver buiten zijn eigen werkterrein lagen. Zo liet hij zich bij het maken van het schilderij Les Demoiselles d’Avignon, sterk beïnvloeden door Afrikaanse kunst. Maskers uit dat continent, waren een belangrijke inspiratiebron voor de totstandkoming van dit werk. Nu wordt het gezien als een van de meest baanbrekende schilderijen uit de kunstgeschiedenis.

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It's now tougher (and more expensive) to find big ideas - Futurity

It's now tougher (and more expensive) to find big ideas - Futurity | Innovation and the knowledge economy | Scoop.it

Big ideas are getting harder and harder to find, and innovations have become increasingly massive and costly endeavors, according to new research.

As a result, tremendous continual increases in research and development will be needed to sustain even today’s low rate of economic growth.

This means modern-day inventors—even those in the league of Steve Jobs—will have a tough time measuring up to the productivity of the Thomas Edisons of the past.

Nicholas Bloom, senior fellow at the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research and coauthor of a paper released this week by the National Bureau of Economic Research, contends that so many game-changing inventions have appeared since World War II that it’s become increasingly difficult to come up with the next big idea.

The thought now of somebody inventing something as revolutionary as the locomotive on their own is inconceivable,” Bloom says.

“It’s certainly true if you go back one or two hundred years, like when Edison invented the light bulb,” he says. “It’s a massive piece of technology and one guy basically invented it. But while we think of Steve Jobs and the iPhone, it was a team of dozens of people who created the iPhone.


Via Wildcat2030
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Facebook’s open source React library is increasingly worrying devs

Facebook’s open source React library is increasingly worrying devs | Innovation and the knowledge economy | Scoop.it
Should developers be afraid of Zuckerbergs bearing gifts?
Trudy Raymakers's insight:
Developers do need to be worried.
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Association of European Research Libraries (LIBER) Publishes Five Principles for Negotiations with Publishers Re: Open Access

Association of European Research Libraries (LIBER) Publishes Five Principles for Negotiations with Publishers Re: Open Access | Innovation and the knowledge economy | Scoop.it
From the Association of European Research Libraries (LIBER): The principles are based on the experiences of LIBER libraries in the past two years, and aim to guide libraries and consortia as they shift from a reader-pays model (subscription licensing) to an author-pays model based on Articl
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Five minutes with Mariana Mazzucato: “We have socialised the risk of innovation but privatised the rewards”

Five minutes with Mariana Mazzucato: “We have socialised the risk of innovation but privatised the rewards” | Innovation and the knowledge economy | Scoop.it

Five minutes with Mariana Mazzucato: “We have socialised the risk of innovation but privatised the rewards”

The public sector is often seen as sclerotic and conservative in contrast with a dynamic and innovative private sector. This assumption lies at the basis of much of the outsourcing of public services to the private sector. In this interview and her new book, Mariana Mazzucato argues against this assessment and in favour of state-led innovation and economic growth. She maintains that the public sector usually bears the highest risks of funding innovation without then reaping the rewards.

What are the myths about the public sector and private sector that you say need to be debunked?

The myth is of a dynamic, creative, colourful, entrepreneurial private sector, that at most needs ‘unleashing’ from its constraints from the public sector. The latter is instead depicted as necessary for fixing ‘market failures’ (investing in ‘public goods’ like infrastructure or basic research) but inherently bureaucratic, slow, grey, and often too ‘meddling’. It is told to stick to the ‘basics’ but to avoid getting too directly involved in the economy.

Instead, if we look around the world, those countries that have grown or are growing through innovation-led growth are countries where the state did not limit itself to just solving ‘market failures’ but actually developed strategic missions, and was active in directing public investment in particular areas with scale and scope, changing the technological and market landscape in the process. And ironically one of the government’s that have been most active on this front is the US government, which is usually depicted in the media (and by politicians) as being more ‘market oriented’. From putting a man on the moon, to developing what later became the Internet, the US government, through a host of different public agencies, provided direct financing not only of basic research but also applied research and even early stage public venture capital (indeed Apple received $500,000 directly from public funds). In each case it provided funding for the most high risk/uncertain investments, while the private sector sat waiting behind.



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CES 2018: Running list of digital health products

CES 2018: Running list of digital health products | Innovation and the knowledge economy | Scoop.it

CES has begun and innovators from all over the globe have flocked to Las Vegas to show off their latest products. While news of smart cities and self driving cars seems to be taking over the Internet coverage of the event, digital health innovators have a few tricks up their own sleeves hoping to disrupt the industry. From a mouthguard that can detect concussions to a cuddly AI duck that comforts kids with cancer, digital health innovators have a myriad of products to offer. 

Below is a running list of digital health products on display at CES. We'll update this list with more products as the week goes on.

The future of concussion detection could come in the form of a mouthguard. 
Philips just launched a new sleep enhancement product called SmartSleep.
Healbe will be display its weight loss and maintenance wearable, GoBe2. 
Cardiomo will be showing off its wearable vital monitor. The wireless monitor fits on the users chest and continuously collects vital data. The technology uses an algorithm which picks up on heart abnormalities and gives preventative suggestions.
Bewell has just unveiled its latest product called MyPeriTens, a connected device designed to help treat women with weak pelvic floor issues. 
A cuddly Aflac duck could be key to comforting kids living with cancer. 
Omron Healthcare unveiled the Omron Blood Pressure Monitor + EKG, a home medical device that measures blood pressure and EKG. 

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The Dutch city that’s more like Dubai

The Dutch city that’s more like Dubai | Innovation and the knowledge economy | Scoop.it
You should always arrive in Rotterdam by train. That way, as you leave the station, you can turn around, as I did last month, put your bag down and look back at one of the most joyful buildings in the world. It’s the most exuberantly designed transportation hub since architect Eero Saarinen’s TWA Flight Center at Idlewild Airport (later renamed JFK). Rotterdam Station soars, ignoring gravity, a balletic leap captured in steel, glass and wood.

This is the architectural test kitchen of Europe

In any other city it would be a centrepiece, probably an anomaly, like Bilbao’s Guggenheim or Toronto’s City Hall. But in Rotterdam, it fits right in. This is a city of wild experimentation, the architectural test kitchen of Europe, a post-war Dubai or Doha, but done better. Instead of being thrown up by a single generation of wealthy people looking to make a global reputation, Rotterdam has evolved over three quarters of a century in response to the developing needs of its people and the times they have lived in. It’s a liveable, walkable, bikeable city. But it’s managed, like those Gulf state insta-cities, to impress at every turn, not with two or three standout buildings – a Transamerica Pyramid here, a Walt Disney Concert Hall there ­– but dozens.

But it wasn’t always this way.
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The Evolving Landscape of Federated Research Data Infrastructures

The Evolving Landscape of Federated Research Data Infrastructures | Innovation and the knowledge economy | Scoop.it
The Evolving Landscape of Federated Research Data Infrastructures Via Gary Price at LJ InfoDocket "From a Knowledge Exchange Introductory Post and an Abstract (via Zenodo): In 2016 the Knowledge Exchange Research Data expert group identified a need for better understanding of the nature and consequences of research and data infrastructure being more and more federated. Work was designed to find…
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Civic NationVoice: Civics Unbound: Knowledge, Skills, And Dispositions For A Thriving Democracy

Civic NationVoice: Civics Unbound: Knowledge, Skills, And Dispositions For A Thriving Democracy | Innovation and the knowledge economy | Scoop.it

Higher education institutions across the United States are doing creative, painstaking, hopeful work to prepare students for lives of meaningful engagement in their communities and democracy. Typically the focus of these efforts is on developing the knowledge, skills, and dispositions students need to cast informed votes, deliberate about public issues, appreciate perspectives and experiences they may not share, and serve as responsible stewards and change-agents.

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Learning How To Learn: Anatomy Of A Good MOOC - eLearning Industry

Learning How To Learn: Anatomy Of A Good MOOC - eLearning Industry | Innovation and the knowledge economy | Scoop.it
Interested in an anatomy of a good MOOC? Check why the Learning How To Learn MOOC has 2 million learners and a retention rate 5 times more than other MOOCs.

Via Dr. Susan Bainbridge
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What We Can Learn From the Second Life of Google Glass

What We Can Learn From the Second Life of Google Glass | Innovation and the knowledge economy | Scoop.it

For every new piece of technology that gets developed, you can usually find people saying it will never be useful. The president of the Michigan Savings Bank in 1903, for example, said, “The horse is here to stay but the automobile is only a novelty—a fad.” It’s equally easy to find people raving about whichever new technology is at the peak of the Gartner Hype Cycle, which tracks the buzz around these newest developments and attempts to temper predictions. When technologies emerge, there are all kinds of uncertainties, from the actual capacity of the technology to its use cases in real life to the price tag.

Eventually the dust settles, and some technologies get widely adopted, to the extent that they can become “invisible”; people take them for granted. Others fall by the wayside as gimmicky fads or impractical ideas. Picking which horses to back is the difference between Silicon Valley millions and Betamax pub-quiz-question obscurity. For a while, it seemed that Google had—for once—backed the wrong horse.

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A Modern Professional Learner’s Toolkit for 2018 – Modern Workplace Learning Magazine

A Modern Professional Learner’s Toolkit for 2018 – Modern Workplace Learning Magazine | Innovation and the knowledge economy | Scoop.it
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Where Do New Ideas Come From?

Where Do New Ideas Come From? | Innovation and the knowledge economy | Scoop.it

With close study, the genealogies of even the most original ideas can be traced
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How Student Makers Solve Real-World Problems - iQ by Intel

How Student Makers Solve Real-World Problems - iQ by Intel | Innovation and the knowledge economy | Scoop.it
Student makers tackle real-world challenges with Maker Share missions, creating innovative tech solutions driven by hands-on learning and a passion to make a difference.

Whenever teenager Hannah Edge suffered an asthma attack, it often resulted in a trip to the emergency room for a spirometry test. The bulky diagnostic machine, which tests lung function, always helped her recover. She wondered if she could build a small portable measuring device that she could use at home, something that could also help other asthma patients avoid regular trips to the hospital.

Edge embodies the creative and problem-solving spirit of the maker movement. At only age 15, she founded SpiroEdge, a start-up medical device company. Her portable lung function analyzer could potentially help patients who suffer from asthma, a respiratory condition that affects 25 million people in the U.S.
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Facebook Built Its Vision of Democracy on Bad Data

Facebook Built Its Vision of Democracy on Bad Data | Innovation and the knowledge economy | Scoop.it
Mark Zuckerberg argues that more information reaching more people enhances democracy. But, as the adage goes, quantity does not equal quality.
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Blockchain in Education

Presentation of the European Commission's JRC report on blockchain in education focusing on digital accreditation of learning. Groningen, 5th September 2017

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To be creative, learn these seven stages of creativity

To be creative, learn these seven stages of creativity | Innovation and the knowledge economy | Scoop.it

Art is hard. Creative insights are hard to predict, and just when it gets difficult, your mind immediately jumps to a distraction: something easier to do, an excuse, a scapegoat.
To get the most out of your creative energy, carve out space for creative work. To make that space, you need to make space for the other types of work, too. The key to this is understanding how creative insights happen.
The four “stages of control” that build creative insights

In 1891, German scientist Hermann von Helmholtz—whose accomplishments included inventing the ophthalmoscope—was honored with a party for his 70th birthday. He got up to make a speech, and shared how he achieved his creative insights:
Often … [ideas] arrived suddenly, without any effort on my part, like an inspiration.… They never came to a fatigued brain and never at the writing desk. It was always necessary, first of all, that I should have turned my problem over on all sides to such an extent that I had all its angles and complexities “in my head.” … Then … there must come an hour of complete physical freshness and quiet well-being, before the good ideas arrived. Often they were there in the morning when I first awoke.… But they liked especially to make their appearance while I was taking an easy walk over wooded hills in sunny weather.
Thirty-five years later, social psychologist Graham Wallas cited Helmholtz’s speech, and proposed four “stages of control”: Preparation, Incubation, Illumination, and Verification.
During Preparation, you’re learning everything you can about the problem, or, as Helmholtz would say you’ve “turned [the] problem over on all sides” so that everything about it is “in [your] head.”
During Incubation, you’re allowing your unconscious mind to work on the problem. It happens while you’re “taking an easy walk over wooded hills,” or while you’re sleeping. Whatever you do to achieve “complete physical freshness and quiet well-being.”
When Illumination happens, the solution comes to you. As Helmholtz said, it doesn’t tend to happen while you’re sitting at your desk. It might be when you’ve just woken up.
During Verification, you ensure that the idea meets up to your standards. Does it solve the problems you identified during the Preparation stage?
These four stages have been cited in thousands of research papers on creativity. As neuroscientists Mark Beeman and John Kounios wrote in their book The Eureka Factor, Helmholtz’s observations still stand up more than 120 years later.

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