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Another Fatal Accident Hits A Samsung Plant

Another Fatal Accident Hits A Samsung Plant | Seguridad Industrial | Scoop.it

Three workers were killed and 12 injured on the late afternoon of July 26 when a huge water tank burst during a stress test at the Samsung Fine Chemicals Co., Ltd. plant in Ulsan, South Korea.


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Samsung Contract Worker Dies After Working An Average of 60 Hours A week

Samsung Contract Worker Dies After Working An Average of 60 Hours A week | Seguridad Industrial | Scoop.it

A young contractor of Samsung Electronics’ customer service arm died of what appears to be overwork, after putting in an average 60 hours a week in the past four months since May.Deadly Peak Season...


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Callum Dunlop's curator insight, March 28, 2015 7:46 PM

I think we have all had a time where we have felt overwork and under achieved, but this takes it to the next level.  But even if we look at this on a lower scale of the spectrum, especially in Australia how many times do see co-workers burn out because they are over worked? This directly relates to OHS and because it is about protecting your employees. We need to monitor our staff in the same sort of manner we would if they were using a dangerous piece of machinery. It relates to workplace safety being everyone’s responsibility – from management to the person standing next to you.

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Facultad de Química advierte sobre toxicidad en los laciados - El Observador

Facultad de Química advierte sobre toxicidad en los laciados - El Observador | Seguridad Industrial | Scoop.it
Facultad de Química advierte sobre toxicidad en los laciados El Observador La Administración de Seguridad y Salud Ocupacional de Estados Unidos (OSHA, por su sigla en inglés) señala que debe establecerse en la etiqueta que contiene formaldehído si...

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Gabriela Reyes's curator insight, March 6, 2014 4:26 PM

Este es un pequeño ejemplo de los riesgos quimicos y enfermedades ocupacionales.

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Cada día un trabajador fallece en accidente laboral en España - Cambio16 Diario Digital

Cada día un trabajador fallece en accidente laboral en España - Cambio16 Diario Digital | Seguridad Industrial | Scoop.it
Cambio16 Diario Digital Cada día un trabajador fallece en accidente laboral en España Cambio16 Diario Digital Con motivo de la cercanía del 28 de abril, día de la Salud y Seguridad en el Trabajo, ambos sindicatos, CCOO y UGT, denuncian los recortes...

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Riesgos Químicos en operación de pulidora

Exposición a riesgos químicos (polvos derivados de la abrasión por concreto)
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2014 - 02/26/2014 - OSHA issues 2014 inspection plan to reduce injuries and illnesses at high-hazard workplaces


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salud ocupacional- riesgos al no usar los elementos de seguridad contra accidentes

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Capacitacion contra los Riesgos Quimicos.

Este apoyo audiovisual esta dirigido al personal para hacer frente a los riesgos químicos que se susciten en la empresa según las NOM.-- Created using PowToo...
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10 killed in Bangladesh garment factory fire

At least 10 garment workers including some of the factory’s officials were killed and many injured by a devastating fire at a garment factory in Sreepur upazila, Gazipur on the outskirts of Dhaka, on Tuesday.

The fire originated in the dyeing section of Aswad Composite Mills owned by the Palmal Group.

The cause of the blaze is yet to be ascertained. However, eyewitnesses said, the flame spread to a nearby chemical store on the first floor and in no time engulfed the two floors.

Firemen recovered seven bodies from the ground floor and two from the second floor of the two-storey factory. Police said most of the bodies were charred beyond recognition.

At least 170 workers were on duty on the two floors when the fire broke out.


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India Says NO to Asbestos

December 2, 2013.

Over 300 scientists and health defenders from 36 countries condemn dangerous misinformation being disseminated in India by asbestos industry organisations

In a letter released today, over 200 scientists and over 100 labour and health organizations from 36 countries strongly condemned efforts by asbestos industry organisations to promote use of chrysotile asbestos in India. The letter, sent to Health Minister Sh Gulam Nabi Azad, Labour Minister Sh Sis Ram Ola and Environment Minister Ms Jayanthi Natarajan, noted that the asbestos industry is on a mission to enhance its profits and urged the National Government of India to put the health of the Indian population ahead of the vested interests of the asbestos industry.

“The International Chrysotile Association and the Asbestos Cement Products Manufacturers’ Association of India (ACPMA) are disseminating deadly, deceptive misinformation about chrysotile asbestos, that will cause suffering and loss of life for years to come,” said Dr. Joseph LaDou, Emeritus Chair, Division of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, University of California School of Medicine, USA.

“These organisations claim that scientific research shows that chrysotile asbestos can be safely used,” said Professor Luiz Augusto Facchini, Department of Social Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Universidade Federal de Pelotas, Brazil. “This claim is utterly false. The International Agency for Research on Cancer and the World Health Organization, as well as numerous other scientific organisations, have all called for an end to the use of chrysotile asbestos in order to prevent further tragic epidemics of asbestos-related diseases.”

“While a handful of scientists financed by and allied to the asbestos industry, deny the health risks of chrysotile asbestos and promote its continued used, not a single reputable scientific body in the world supports this position,” said Dr. Fernand Turcotte, Professor Emeritus of Preventive Medicine and Public Health, Laval University, Québec, Canada.

In the face of the public health disaster caused by asbestos, 54 countries have banned any use of asbestos. The asbestos industry, in order to ensure its continued profits, is aggressively targeting Asian countries for sales. Just six Asian countries – China, India, Indonesia, Vietnam, Thailand and Sri Lanka – now represent 70% of world asbestos consumption.

India imports more asbestos than any other country in the world, with imports having risen from 253,382 tons in 2006 to 473,240 tons in 2012, an increase of 186%. “These vast amounts of asbestos, being placed in homes and schools across India, are a deadly time bomb that will go on causing suffering and deaths for decades to come,” said Dr V. Murlidhar, Pneumoconiosis compensation board, TN Trust, UK and Trauma surgeon, Mumbai, India.

As a result of increased use of asbestos in Asia, asbestos experts, Dr. G.V. Le and Dr. K. Takahashi have warned: “A surge of Asbestos Related Disorders (ARD) in Asia should be anticipated in the coming decades. Asian countries should not only cease asbestos use but also prepare themselves for an impending epidemic of ARD.”

One of the ‘eminent’ speakers at the forthcoming industry conference, Dr David Bernstein was found by a New York court early this year to have committed potential crime-fraud by billing per hour to publish papers in the scientific literature that were financed and controlled by an asbestos products company.[1]

The independence of a 2012 study conducted by the National Institute of Occupational Health titled ‘Health hazards/ environmental hazards resulting from use of Chrysotile variety of asbestos in the country’ commissioned by the Ministry of Chemicals and Petrochemicals was tarnished by the participation of the asbestos industry behind the scenes.

Commenting on the study, Dr Arthur Frank, Professor of Public Health, Drexel University, USA stated: “There are so many things wrong with this study it is hard to know where to begin. Perhaps the single most damning statement in the whole document is to be found on page 106 - All workers were using personal protective equipment device such as a piece of cloth as mask. Who could possibly believe that a piece of cloth acts as a piece of protective equipment for microscopic Asbestos dust?”

“It shows cynical indifference on the part of the asbestos industry that they are holding their event to promote a toxic product on the anniversary of the Bhopal tragedy,” said Pralhad Malvadkar, Occupational Health and Safety Centre, Mumbai.  “The millions of tons of asbestos that are being placed in homes and schools in India will create thousands of innocent victims, while this irresponsible industry reaps the profits. A slow motion Bhopal is being created. It may be reliably predicted that the toll of death and disease from asbestos in India will be at least 10 to 100 times as great as that from the disaster in Bhopal.  The corporate mentality that is the cause is the same in both cases”.

We call on the three government ministers to reject the discredited propaganda of a tainted, irresponsible industry and instead show leadership that respects reputable science and protection of health.

We call on the national government to adopt an enlightened policy and to support the WHO’s recommendation to end all use of asbestos in India.

CONTACT:

Mohit Gupta, OEHNI: oehni.del@gmail.com

Krishnendu Mukherjee, Barrister: tublumukherjee@yahoo.co.uk

Madhumita Dutta, OEHNI: madhudutta.new@gmail.com


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Jamis Brooks's curator insight, March 8, 2014 6:59 AM

To think that Asbestos is still being used in this day and age after all the law suits and the health risks it has presented. It is essential for the UN to step in and stop this injustice. 

OHS OHS's curator insight, July 18, 2014 9:55 AM

It is hard to understand that there would even be any reason in todays world to continue to use asbestos. 

 

It goes to show that there is still a long way to come in OHS in a lot of poorer nations around the world.

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Por qué la ergonomía hace empresas más productivas - La Nación (Chile)

Por qué la ergonomía hace empresas más productivas La Nación (Chile) Es decir, vincula al individuo, la tarea que desempeña y el entorno en el cual se desenvuelve, con la finalidad de prevenir el desarrollo de enfermedades y a su vez, optimizar su...

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El calzado de seguridad, clave para evitar accidentes laborales

El calzado de seguridad, clave para evitar accidentes laborales | Seguridad Industrial | Scoop.it
Las profesiones relacionadas con la industria, la construcción, la siderurgia, la metalurgia o electricidad son las que entrañan mayor riesgo para los pies y, por tanto, requieren mayor protección.

Via Daniel Poma Ayala, Gabriela Reyes
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Vías de evacuación obstruidas, salidas inexistentes y malos olores

Vías de evacuación obstruidas, salidas inexistentes y malos olores | Seguridad Industrial | Scoop.it
No están señalizadas ni las salidas de emergencia ni las vías de evacuación y los trabajadores no han sido formados en medidas de evacuación.
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Oregon OSHA En Español

Oregon OSHA official website, providing workplace safety and health regulations, education, and enforcement information.
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Seguridad en el manejo de químicos- Prevención de Riesgos

Aspectos básicos de seguridad en el manejo de químicos. Si les sirve, un me gusta al video :)
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Prevención de Accidentes Laborales y Enfermedades Ocupacionales

Video sobre prevención de accidentes laborales y enfermedades ocupacionales, posee material relacionado a los factores de riesgos en el trabajo, visita nuest...
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