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David Carr on curation, crowdsourcing, and the future of journalism

David Carr on curation, crowdsourcing, and the future of journalism | Information Skills | Scoop.it

"With search you’re pulling stuff in, and with social you’re pushing stuff out and sharing it. You’re developing an intellectual and social identity in doing so. You can depend on the wisdom of crowds to do so, to set up your media streams — but in my experience? Crowds: not that wise."

 

I think the primary concern is consumer literacy. Over and over, I think you should look at the source of information. There are lines sort of evaporating between what is marketing content and what is editorial content, what is government content — that all gets flattened out on the web so it all sort of looks the same, and the trade dress disappears. So are you reading news from a verifiable, reliable source, or are you reading propaganda? I think it’s sort of important to know where stuff came from.

 

I do think authorship in a pure sense and curation in a practical sense — credit where credit is due. In part because that’s often the only compensation that’s out there. That ego compensation or artistic compensation. When you rub that out and say, ‘I’ll rip you off whether you’re a company or some kid working in a dorm room’ — the web is a friction-free environment where it’s easy to produce content, but it’s a little short on incentives to produce content. Getting credit is one form of compensation.

 

I don’t think either Bill or Julian [Assange, editor in chief of WikiLeaks] believes that anymore. Julian initially believed that ubiquity of content would drive demand, when in fact it’s scarcity that drives demand.

 

As war becomes a more mechanized and privatized affair, it necessarily becomes a less knowable activity. Historically, public awareness about conflicts has been a driver of those conflicts and how they end. I think when you take public accountability out of wars — all of which seem undeclared; many of which seem under-covered — you create an environment where people can engage in acts of war however they want and expect that it will be virtually impossible to cover them.

 

It’s remarkable to have to say something like that at a time when there’s a parallel story running in which, given the internet, given the amazing tools of content distribution at our disposal — we still have these black spaces from which no one can get any information. I could not agree with you any more. The promise was that the reduction in friction and how information moves would lead to more openness, but I think it’s sparked institutional responses in creating artificial sources of friction to keep information from flowing too freely.

 

 It’s a weird sort of evolution. I will admit that this Guardian experiment, where social caught up with and overtook search in a matter of weeks — that really got my attention. But it does run the risk that the meaning of sharing could become demeaned over time. It becomes a passive activity. And if you’re putting all your stories out there and they’re being spreading frictionlessly on social, the hierarchy of importance among various stories is being settled democratically — or algorithmically, with people attached.

But now that I’m bathed in information every single day and stuff is wooshing by me, I kind of love the full-stop arrangement of stories on The New York Times. A lot of times I wake up and think about the day that’s just passed and wonder, ‘What was that? What happened?’ A lot of stuff, and I can’t really tell which part of it was important.

 

With search you’re pulling stuff in, and with social you’re pushing stuff out and sharing it. You’re developing an intellectual and social identity in doing so. You can depend on the wisdom of crowds to do so, to set up your media streams — but in my experience? Crowds: not that wise. I wouldn't want an informational diet that depends on what’s trending on Twitter.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Discover News According To Your Preferred Interests: Prismatic

Discover News According To Your Preferred Interests: Prismatic | Information Skills | Scoop.it

Robin Good: Prismatic is a news discovery tool allowing you to select and specify the "interests" and topics on which you want to be kept up-to-date.

 

Once configured Prismatic offers a well laid out web-based magazine format in which you can pick and look at any of your preferred news topics.

 

Prismatic automatically provides detailed information about each news story it will present you, including the number of times it has already been shared and the relevant tags associated to it.

 

Initially Prismatic connects to your main social networks (FB and Twitter) to learn about your interests and then gradually learns with your help what kind of content you are most interested in. 

 

Prismatic has two ways to discover new interests: search and links to related feeds. Search can find topic and publisher feeds or you can create a new feed from a query. Each story has links to related feeds, which you can follow to explore new interests.

 

Check out more News Discovery Tools here: 

https://www.mindmeister.com/134760952 ;

 

Free to use. 

 

Try it out now: http://getprismatic.com 


Via Robin Good
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Otir's comment, April 10, 2012 8:28 AM
Have you tried it? How is it different from ScoopIt?
Robin Good's comment, April 10, 2012 8:44 AM
Hello Otir, yes I have.

Nothing to do with Scoop.it. This is good either to create a page where to see all of your preferred RSS feeds in a visual fashion, or to create out of your feeds a visual page that displays them all.
Otir's comment, April 10, 2012 5:25 PM
Thanks for your reply, Robin! I will look into it more in depth then! Seems really interesting... (so many new tools, so little time, though :-)
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If You Are Searching For Content, Here Is Where To Search: Top Vertical Search Engines

If You Are Searching For Content, Here Is Where To Search: Top Vertical Search Engines | Information Skills | Scoop.it

Robin Good: Adam Vincenzini on TheNextWeb has put together a nice and useful list of the 30 dedicated search engines that you can use to explore and research specific content areas. 

 

From blogs to video and forums, here is a good list of search engine tools from where you can start your own research.

 

Helpful. 7/10

 

Full list: http://thenextweb.com/lifehacks/2012/04/29/30-specialist-and-super-smart-search-engines/ ;


Via Ana Cristina Pratas, Robin Good
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Gust MEES's curator insight, February 15, 2013 1:11 PM

Try them out...

 

Jeff Domansky's curator insight, June 29, 2013 8:42 PM

Great list and useful alternatives to Google search.

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How to: verify content from social media (like a boss)

How to: verify content from social media (like a boss) | Information Skills | Scoop.it

- Monitor across platforms (including Facebook, YouTube, Twitter, Soundcloud, AudioBoo, Bambuser)

- Spot and understand trends (using tools like Hootsuite, Tweetdeck and Trendsmap to create lists and identify trending topics)

- Build a network of contacts before the story breaks and limit the stress
- Use online tools to examine evolution of images (including TinEye, Google Images and WolframAlfra)
- Verifying sources – speak to them and cross reference answers with social data
- Verifying sources – look at social media history across platforms
- Use Whois tools to verify websites
- Check for photoshopping or repetition in images
- Apply the Too Good To Be True test
- Harness online discussion boards and experts (use sites like Snope to spot urban myths and common hoaxes early on)
- Question edited footage
- How urgent is it – could more steps be taken to verify before you publish?
- Crowdsourcing – 'be judicious' about how you send out unconfirmed information
- Consider any permissions and crediting which may be necessary
- Clearly communicate the level of verification a story has been given
- Made a mistake or new information come to light? Issue a clear and networked correction

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Summarize The Content of Any Web Page with Cruxbot

Summarize The Content of Any Web Page with Cruxbot | Information Skills | Scoop.it

Robin Good: Summarize the content of any web page by simply clicking on a dedicated bookmarklet. This is What Cruxbot does, while adding two great features:

 

1. The ability to determine how much to summarize dinamically.

 

2. The ability to have the summary built around specific keywords available in the content.

 

Cruxbot is free to use.

 

How to use it : http://www.cruxbot.com/howToUse.html ;


Try it out now: http://www.cruxbot.com 


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Ann Blair on The History of Information

Ann Blair on The History of Information | Information Skills | Scoop.it

1, A Social History of Knowledge : Nói về cách thông tin được lan truyền từ xưa đến nay, đến việc thành lập các viện, think tank của chính phủ nhằm "gathered, classified, deciphered, evaluated, corrected and disseminated knowledge, and how information could be used for policy purposes or not, and how information was hidden, lost, and destroyed – intentionally and not"

 

2, The History of Reading in the West : Nói về mental process trong quá trình đọc sách, từ văn hóa oral theo số đông đến việc đọc sách viết một mình trong sự tập trung, tĩnh lặng.

 

3, Too Much to Know: Nói về cách thức quản lý luồng thông tin của con người từ thời Phục Hưng.

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Đỗ Hoàng Tùng's comment, May 18, 2012 1:33 PM
Em có muốn mua cuốn nào ko? Anh đặt hộ cho?