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Information Literacy Weblog: New #SCONUL 7 Pillars publications: employability lens; review

Information Literacy Weblog: New #SCONUL 7 Pillars publications: employability lens; review | infoliteracy | Scoop.it

New #SCONUL 7 Pillars publications: employability lens; review, By Sheila Webber /Information Literacy Weblog https://t.co/UZks6mZY7s

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The Four Stages Of The Self-Directed Learning Model

The Four Stages Of The Self-Directed Learning Model | infoliteracy | Scoop.it
The Four Stages Of The Self-Directed Learning Model

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
Elsa Winch's insight:

Nice synthesis of inquiry vs. just finding

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Carlos Rodrigues Cadre's curator insight, November 30, 2014 2:54 PM

adicionar a sua visão ...

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Metacognition: The Gift That Keeps Giving

Metacognition: The Gift That Keeps Giving | infoliteracy | Scoop.it
Many teachers we know enjoy teaching students how to wield one of the most powerful thinking tools: metacognition, or the ability to think about your thoughts with the aim of improving learning. A metaphor that resonates with many students is that learning cognitive and metacognitive strategies offers them tools to "drive their brains." The good news for teachers and their students is that metacognition can be learned when it is explicitly taught and practiced across content and social contexts.

A student who is excited about being in the driver's seat and steering toward learning success may well be destined to become an independent thinker on the way to charting a responsible course for school, career, and life. Being metacognitive can be likened to being more conscious, reflective, and aware of one's progress along the learning path. Teachers have told us how they feel an extraordinary sense of pleasure teaching their students useful strategies that can be applied to all aspects of their lives in and outside of school.

Via Howard Rheingold
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Howard Rheingold's curator insight, November 5, 2014 6:07 PM

Short, informed article, free of neurobollocks, with 5 practical steps for teaching metacognition -- withlinks to  useful resources

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The Difference Between Google And A Library

The Difference Between Google And A Library | infoliteracy | Scoop.it
TEST  
The Difference Between Google And A Library
by Terry Heick
Ed note: This republished post is part 2 of 2 in a mini-series on Google and student inquiry.

Via Susan Grigsby @sksgrigsby
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Susan Grigsby @sksgrigsby's curator insight, November 17, 2014 8:35 AM

While there may not be "new" information for those of us in library land, this is an excellent article to share with those administrators who think they can replace a certified librarian with a para or parent because of Google. Enjoy!

Julieanne Jackson's curator insight, November 18, 2014 2:39 PM

Donate to charity.  Not only are you helping others in need, you get the tax deduction and de-clutter. http://www.collectibleswithcauses.org/ This non-profit charity accepts collectibles, all different vehicles, real estate, even aircraft. They pick up your donation free of charge. 

Алла Миргородская's curator insight, December 1, 2014 3:23 AM

добавить ваше понимание ...

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Teaching Adolescents How to Evaluate the Quality of Online Information

Teaching Adolescents How to Evaluate the Quality of Online Information | infoliteracy | Scoop.it
Guest blogger Julie Coiro, a professor of education, examines four critical thinking disciplines for helping middle and high school students determine the value of information they read online.

Via Gust MEES
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Mark McLendon's curator insight, September 1, 2014 10:30 PM

Super necessary skills for our kids.

Scott Spargo's curator insight, September 4, 2014 1:16 AM

One of the most difficult skills for students to do well - this provides a nice framework to hang our evaluations on and ideas for how to work with the students as they practise these skills.

Tony Guzman's curator insight, September 4, 2014 9:50 AM

Helping your younger students determine the worth of what they find on the Internet.

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Great Examples of How Content Curation Tools Can Be Effectively Used In Education

Great Examples of How Content Curation Tools Can Be Effectively Used In Education | infoliteracy | Scoop.it

Via Robin Good
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N Kaspar's curator insight, September 2, 2014 12:33 PM

Intriguing idea.

Alina Dogaru's curator insight, December 19, 2014 4:42 AM

Forstå og komme i gang med kurator tjenester.

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Teaching Metacognition

Teaching Metacognition | infoliteracy | Scoop.it

"Metacognition is a critically important, yet often overlooked component of learning. Effective learning involves planning and goal-setting, monitoring one's progress, and adapting as needed. All of these activities are metacognitive in nature. By teaching students these skills - all of which can be learned - we can improve student learning. There are three critical steps to teaching metacognition:

 

Teaching students that their ability to learn is mutableTeaching planning and goal-settingGiving students ample opportunities to practice monitoring their learning and adapting as necessary"
Via Howard Rheingold
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Brad Tollefson's curator insight, July 22, 2013 5:29 PM

Learning how to learn explained...

Dean J. Fusto's comment, September 3, 2013 10:03 PM
Thanks for sharing this. I don't come across many articles such as this on Metacognition. Great scoop!
Dean J. Fusto's curator insight, September 3, 2013 10:05 PM

A wonderful and useful skill to teach our students. I haven't come across many articles on metacognition, but found this on Howard Rheingold's Scoop.it page. Enjoy.

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This Is How to Create A Library in Google Scholar ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning

This Is How to Create A Library in Google Scholar ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning | infoliteracy | Scoop.it

Via Educatorstechnology
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Metacognition: The Gift That Keeps Giving

Metacognition: The Gift That Keeps Giving | infoliteracy | Scoop.it
Many teachers we know enjoy teaching students how to wield one of the most powerful thinking tools: metacognition, or the ability to think about your thoughts with the aim of improving learning. A metaphor that resonates with many students is that learning cognitive and metacognitive strategies offers them tools to "drive their brains." The good news for teachers and their students is that metacognition can be learned when it is explicitly taught and practiced across content and social contexts.

A student who is excited about being in the driver's seat and steering toward learning success may well be destined to become an independent thinker on the way to charting a responsible course for school, career, and life. Being metacognitive can be likened to being more conscious, reflective, and aware of one's progress along the learning path. Teachers have told us how they feel an extraordinary sense of pleasure teaching their students useful strategies that can be applied to all aspects of their lives in and outside of school.

Via Howard Rheingold
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Howard Rheingold's curator insight, November 5, 2014 6:07 PM

Short, informed article, free of neurobollocks, with 5 practical steps for teaching metacognition -- withlinks to  useful resources

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Study Proves Why We Need Digital Literacy Education | DMLcentral

Study Proves Why We Need Digital Literacy Education | DMLcentral | infoliteracy | Scoop.it
Laptops do not make students take notes in a particular way. Rather, they are tools that enable a wide range of note-taking practices, including both summary and synthesis as well as verbatim transcription. Like any other tool, however, students need to be trained how to use them effectively. As this study suggests, when students are not provided this training, they may develop habits that may not be beneficial to their learning. 

It is our job as instructors to identify beneficial habits and teach students how (and when) to apply them. That we do not do so is not a failure of laptops or students, but a failure of their education in an increasingly digital society.

I am not criticizing Mueller and Oppenheimer's research, only the implications they draw from it. The correlation between laptop use and verbatim note taking is incredibly useful information for it allows educators to address how students use their tools. It certainly does not suggest that laptops are "harm[ful]" or should be restricted. The "pen" is not "mightier than the keyboard."

Rather, it demonstrates the need for explicit instruction in how to most effectively take notes, either by pen or laptop. In other words, it points to the need for digital literacy instruction. Indeed, because text can be input into laptops faster than by hand, these tools actually provide a potential benefit to note-takers: the ability to take more notes. This feature of laptops, combined with instruction in how to take notes, could make these tools more effective than pen and paper for learning, not less.

Via Howard Rheingold
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Howard Rheingold's curator insight, November 4, 2014 1:54 PM

Knowing how to use a laptop to take notes is an important element of infotention literacy -- as is knowing why this is so.

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In the Library with the Lead Pipe » Becoming a Writer-Librarian

In the Library with the Lead Pipe » Becoming a Writer-Librarian | infoliteracy | Scoop.it

Via MCLibrarianRMIT
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Metacognition: ask, not only ‘What are you learning?’ but ‘How are you learning?’

Metacognition: ask, not only ‘What are you learning?’ but ‘How are you learning?’ | infoliteracy | Scoop.it

Vanderbilt University

 

"Metacognition is, put simply, thinking about one’s thinking.  More precisely, it refers to the processes used to plan, monitor, and assess one’s understanding and performance. Metacognition includes a critical awareness of a) one’s thinking and learning and b) oneself as a thinker and learner.


Metacognitive practices increase students’ abilities to transfer or adapt their learning to new contexts and tasks."


Via Mel Riddile
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Mel Riddile's curator insight, July 25, 2014 9:13 AM

Four assignments for explicit instruction:


  1. Preassessments—Encouraging Students to Examine Their Current Thinking
  2. The Muddiest Point—Giving Students Practice in Identifying Confusions
  3. Retrospective Postassessments—Pushing Students to Recognize Conceptual Change
  4. Reflective Journals—Providing a Forum in Which Students Monitor Their Own Thinking




Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's curator insight, July 25, 2014 7:05 PM

Emotional intelligence and learning how to learn might be the two most important teaching work we do for children. It is about connecting with what is important in healthy ways and understanding learning more completely. We can never do this completely, but we should make the effort.

Nicola Parkin's curator insight, July 28, 2014 7:35 PM

Nice! 4 strategies for helping learner learn to learn.

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Helping Students See Themselves As Thinkers

Helping Students See Themselves As Thinkers | infoliteracy | Scoop.it
TEST Merging Metacognition & Citizenship
by Terry Heick
Ed note: This post has been updated from a previous post in 2013.
Why should someone learn?

Via Prof. Hankell
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Prof. Hankell's curator insight, August 6, 2014 6:24 AM

Self-knowledge is formed through ranges of meta-cognition and basic epistemology...