InfoLiteracy
150 views | +0 today
Follow
InfoLiteracy
Information Literacy in Post Secondary Education
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Amanda McAndrew from 21st Century Learning and Teaching
Scoop.it!

Stop Teaching Students What to Think. Teach Them How to Think

The challenge is not information storage but information processing. It's not about information itself but how to use information. The teaching of creativity, curiosity, critical thinking, analytical thinking, problem-solving, and a love of learning itself will be critical to transitioning from the industrial age to the automated age.

 

Learning how to collaborate and empathize with others will be key. To be human is not to be a lone robot performing a singular task in a vacuum but to be a member of the whole of humanity contributing in countless interdependent ways, including even entirely unpaid ways. This will require nothing less than a redefinition of work itself.


Most people when they talk about the future of work are talking about the future of paid work. But the future of work must recognize all work. Take, for example, someone editing Wikipedia, or contributing code to the open-source code-sharing platform GitHub, or even simply taking care of a family member in the same way any paid care worker would. All of that is important work but would be done for purpose, not pay.

 

Most people when they talk about the future of work are talking about the future of paid work. But the future of work must recognize all work. Take, for example, someone editing Wikipedia, or contributing code to the open-source code-sharing platform GitHub, or even simply taking care of a family member in the same way any paid care worker would. All of that is important work but would be done for purpose, not pay.

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching

 


Via Gust MEES
more...
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's curator insight, October 1, 6:20 PM
How we think is part of what differentiates each person.
Chuck Bartok's curator insight, October 2, 10:47 AM
Social media has a positive side and negative. It increases the Headline and Sound Byte syndrome and may not encourage the ability to THINK.
Your thoughts?
 
Sharon Berman's curator insight, October 2, 5:27 PM
Interesting perspective on the changing world of work and how education can assist in the change.
Rescooped by Amanda McAndrew from Digital Delights - Digital Tribes
Scoop.it!

Critical Knowledge: 4 Domains More Important Than Academics

Critical Knowledge: 4 Domains More Important Than Academics | InfoLiteracy | Scoop.it
Critical Knowledge: 4 Domains More Important Than Academics That Change Students & Communities

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
more...
Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, August 17, 10:19 AM
Critical Knowledge: 4 Domains More Important Than Academics
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's curator insight, August 17, 12:48 PM
Parker Palmer wrote that the least asked question is about who we are. Integrity and identity emerge from that question.
Nancy Jones's curator insight, August 18, 2:01 PM
"To move from students to learners–well, there are probably dozens of ways to make a move like this, but somewhere on that list is using technology, project-based learning, and place-based education to truly turn a school inside-out." 
Rescooped by Amanda McAndrew from 21st Century Learning and Teaching
Scoop.it!

Exploring Curation as a core competency in digital and media literacy education  | #ModernEDU #LEARNing2LEARN

Exploring Curation as a core competency in digital and media literacy education  | #ModernEDU #LEARNing2LEARN | InfoLiteracy | Scoop.it

Article: Exploring Curation as a core competency in digital and media literacy education.

 

In today’s hypermedia landscape, youth and young adults are increasingly using social media platforms, online aggregators and mobile applications for daily information use. Communication educators, armed with a host of free, easy-to-use online tools, have the ability to create dynamic approaches to teaching and learning about information and communication flow online.

 

In this paper we explore the concept of curation as a student- and creation-driven pedagogical tool to enhance digital and media literacy education. We present a theoretical justification for curation and present six key ways that curation can be used to teach about critical thinking, analysis and expression online.

 

We utilize a case study of the digital curation platform Storify to explore how curation works in the classroom, and present a framework that integrates curation pedagogy into core media literacy education learning outcomes.

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

https://gustmees.wordpress.com/2013/04/25/learn-every-day-a-bit-with-curation/

 

http://blog.scoop.it/2011/11/30/lord-of-curation-series-gust-mees/

 

https://globaleducationandsocialmedia.wordpress.com/2014/01/19/pkm-personal-professional-knowledge-management/

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?&tag=Curation

 

https://gustmees.wordpress.com/2015/05/13/andragogy-adult-teaching-how-to-teach-ict/

 


Via Gust MEES
more...
Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, July 25, 6:03 AM
Exploring Curation as a core competency in digital and media literacy education
Rosemarri Klamn's curator insight, July 31, 8:01 AM

This concept is new to me, although I have practiced this in different forms. It seems logical to utilize this pedagogical approach to curation for students, parents, and teachers alike. We are all learners in today's rapid pace in technological changes.

Dennis T OConnor's curator insight, July 31, 12:59 PM

Thoughtful curation is critical thinking activated.

Rescooped by Amanda McAndrew from iPads, MakerEd and More in Education
Scoop.it!

Use These 5 Steps to Learn How to Ask Good Questions [Infographic]

Use These 5 Steps to Learn How to Ask Good Questions [Infographic] | InfoLiteracy | Scoop.it
Learning how to ask good questions is a cornerstone of learning and living. It’s a practice we use every day. So much of our success in life depends on asking the right questions. So how do we actually do it? It’s easy when you have a solid process.
When we ask good questions in education, the benefits are immeasurable. It lets us clearly define problems and expectations. Students’ research becomes more productive. They have better team communication. It lets them view challenges proactively. It encourages deeper reflection and better learning processes.

Via John Evans
more...
Frank Napoli's curator insight, June 8, 10:02 AM
Expanding your knowledge
Rescooped by Amanda McAndrew from Edumorfosis.it
Scoop.it!

The seven techniques of Learning to Learn

The seven techniques of Learning to Learn | InfoLiteracy | Scoop.it
Learning should not be as hard as you think. There is a method to the art and just like any skill, learning to learn needs practice and mastery. It is much like speed reading. If you know how to read faster, you can end up reading more books in a given time. Similarly, if you learn how to learn efficiently you can spend less time doing the learning and more time enjoying what you have learned.

As a trainer, the topic of learning to learn is even more important since it is not only beneficial to you, but it also helps you to improve your training. As such, it is worth investing time in.

In this article, you will be introduced to seven highly effective techniques that help you maximise learning in a given time. The following methods are presented as if you are applying them to yourself, but you should consider how you can take advantage of them for your learners in a training environment.

Via Edumorfosis
more...
Koen Mattheeuws's curator insight, May 19, 5:40 AM
Zeven toetsstenen om na te gaan of je in jouw klas leert leren. 
Andrea Mejia Medina's curator insight, May 23, 2:35 PM
A paper published in Psychological Science in the Public Interest evaluated some techniques for improving learning. Be aware that everyone thinks they have their own style of learning (they don't, according to the latest research), and the evidence suggests that just because a technique works or does not work for other people does not necessarily mean it will or won’t work well for you. If you want to know how to revise or learn most effectively you will still want to experiment on yourself a little with each technique. Elaborative Interrogation (Rating = moderate) A method involving creating explanations for why stated facts are true. The method involves concentrating on why questions rather than what questions and creating questions for yourself as you are working through a task. This is a good method because it is simple, so anyone can apply it easily. It does however require enough prior knowledge to enable you to generate good questions for yourself, so this method may be best for learners with experience in a subject. Self Explanation (Rating = moderate) A technique that is useful for abstract learning. The technique involves explaining and recording how one solves or understands problems as they work and giving reasons for choices that are made. This was found to be more effective if done while learning as opposed to after learning. Self explanation has been found to be effective with learners ranging from children in kindergarten to older students working on algebraic formulas and geometric theorems. Like elaborative explanation, self explanation benefits from its simplicity. Summarisation (Rating = low) An old staple, tested by having participants summarise every page of text in to a few short lines. Summarising and note taking were found to be beneficial for preparing for written exams but less useful for types of tests that do not require students to generate information – such as multiple choice tests. Highlighting and underlining (Rating = low) The runaway favourite technique of students was found to perform spectacularly poorly when done on its own under controlled conditions. It seems pretty intuitive that highlighting alone is ineffective for the same reasons it is so popular – it requires no training, it takes practically no additional time and crucially, it involves very little thought above the effort taken to simply read a piece of text. The keyword mnemonic (Rating = low) A technique for memorising information involving linking words to meanings through associations based on how a word sounds and creating imagery for specific words. Much research has found that mnemonics are useful for memorising information in the short term in a range of situations including learning foreign language, learning people’s names and occupations, learning scientific terms etc. However, it seems the keyword mnemonic is only effective in instances where keywords are important and the material includes keywords which are inherently easy to memorise. Imagery for Text Learning (Rating = low) Experiments asking students to simply imagine clear visual images as they are reading texts have found advantages when memorising sentences, but these advantages seem much less pronounced when longer pieces of text are involved. Interestingly, visualisation was found to be more effective when students listened to a text than when they read text themselves, implying the act of reading may make it harder to focus on visualizing. Rereading (Rating = low) Overall, rereading is found to be much less effective than other techniques – however the research has drawn some interesting conclusions. Massed rereading – rereading immediately after reading - has been found more effective than outlining and summarising for the same amount of time. It does seem however, that rereading spaced over a longer amount of time has a much stronger effect than massed rereading. Practice Testing (Rating = High) testing is often seen as a necessary evil of education. practice testing seems to result in benefits. Unlike many of the other techniques mentioned, the benefits of practice testing are not modest – studies have found that a practice test can double free recall! Research has found that though multiple choice testing is indeed effective, practice tests that require more detailed answers to be generated are more effective. Importantly, practice testing is effective when you create the questions yourself. Distributed Practice (Rating = High) if you want to remember something for a year you should study at least every month, if you want to remember something for five years you should space your learning every six to twelve months. If you want to remember something for a week you should space your learning 12-24 hours apart. It does seem however that the distributed-practice effect may work best when processing information deeply – so for best results you might want to try a distributed practice and self-testing combo. 

 So it is clear that we are all expected to be able to learn but currently we don’t ever really get taught how to learn. The trick is to experiment with different methods or techniques and to discover the ideal technique for us according to our needs and the one that suits our learning style, as we know there are techniques that can work for many people but for us they do not work as effectively as We expect it.
Sarah's curator insight, May 24, 6:19 PM
Share your insight
Rescooped by Amanda McAndrew from Digital Delights for Learners
Scoop.it!

Web Literacy for Student Fact Checkers

Web Literacy for Student Fact Checkers | InfoLiteracy | Scoop.it
This is an unabashedly practical guide for the student fact-checker. It supplements generic information literacy with the specific web-based techniques that can get you closer to the truth on the web more quickly.

We will show you how to use date filters to find the source of viral content, how to assess the reputation of a scientific journal in less than five seconds, and how to see if a tweet is really from the famous person you think it is or from an impostor.

We’ll show you how to find pages that have been deleted, figure out who paid for the web site you’re looking at, and whether the weather portrayed in that viral video actual matches the weather in that location on that day. We’ll show you how to check a Wikipedia page for recent vandalism, and how to search the text of almost any printed book to verify a quote. We’ll teach you to parse URLs and scan search result blurbs so that you are more likely to get to the right result on the first click. And we’ll show you how to avoid baking confirmation bias into your search terms.

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Amanda McAndrew from Learning Technology News
Scoop.it!

7 suggestions for how to treat willful digital illiteracy in education

7 suggestions for how to treat willful digital illiteracy in education | InfoLiteracy | Scoop.it

Why does digital illiteracy seem acceptable in education? I think we should have higher expectations, which I have expressed in these seven
suggestions.


Via Nik Peachey
more...
Nik Peachey's curator insight, April 21, 4:29 AM

Nice rant here.

Rescooped by Amanda McAndrew from Learning Technology News
Scoop.it!

Fact Check now available in Google Search and News around the world

Fact Check now available in Google Search and News around the world | InfoLiteracy | Scoop.it

After assessing feedback from both users and publishers, we’re making the Fact Check label in Google News available everywhere, and expanding it into Search globally in all languages. For the first time, when you conduct a search on Google that returns an authoritative result containing fact checks for one or more public claims, you will see that information clearly on the search results page. The snippet will display information on the claim, who made the claim, and the fact check of that particular claim.


Via Nik Peachey
more...
Nik Peachey's curator insight, April 12, 8:42 AM

An interesting attempt from Google to help stamp out fake news.

Dennis T OConnor's curator insight, April 12, 3:32 PM

Built in Fact Check for Google Search! 

Rescooped by Amanda McAndrew from Learning Technology News
Scoop.it!

8 digital skills we must teach our children

8 digital skills we must teach our children | InfoLiteracy | Scoop.it

Digital intelligence or “DQ” is the set of social, emotional and cognitive abilities that enable individuals to face the challenges and adapt to the demands of digital life. These abilities can broadly be broken down into eight interconnected areas.


Via Nik Peachey
more...
Mayra.Loves.Books's curator insight, September 3, 2016 8:55 AM
Well put together. An article to share with staff.
Derek Thomas's curator insight, April 2, 7:23 AM
Also useful for the continuing education and professional development sectors
Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, April 3, 9:15 AM
8 Digital Skills
Rescooped by Amanda McAndrew from iGeneration - 21st Century Education (Pedagogy & Digital Innovation)
Scoop.it!

News & Media Literacy - Educator toolkit organized by grade level

News & Media Literacy - Educator toolkit organized by grade level | InfoLiteracy | Scoop.it
Access to information is at an all-time high, but deciphering between fact and fiction is more complex than ever. Use this toolkit to help guide your students to think critically about the media they are consuming and creating.

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Amanda McAndrew from K-12 School Libraries
Scoop.it!

Critical Digital Literacy Explained for Teachers

Critical Digital Literacy Explained for Teachers | InfoLiteracy | Scoop.it
December, 2014
Critical digital literacy is one of the essential required competencies for the 21st century educator. In an era of unprecedented personal publishing, infobesity (information obesity)...

Via Susan Grigsby @sksgrigsby
more...
Gemma Ballarín's curator insight, March 4, 3:23 PM
Critical Digital Literacy
Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, March 8, 1:34 AM
Critical Digital Literacy Explained for Teachers
Encarna Llamas's curator insight, March 11, 3:55 AM
Pensamiento crítico y TICs

Rescooped by Amanda McAndrew from iGeneration - 21st Century Education (Pedagogy & Digital Innovation)
Scoop.it!

18 Incredible Digital Citizenship Web Resources for Teachers by Lee Watanabe Crockett

18 Incredible Digital Citizenship Web Resources for Teachers by Lee Watanabe Crockett | InfoLiteracy | Scoop.it
Digital citizenship Web resources come in many shapes and sizes, and this list of 18 includes some of the best ones out there.

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
more...
Oskar Almazan's curator insight, February 19, 12:50 AM
There are many reputable and respectable organizations whose life’s work is to develop digital citizenship resources to instill its values in educators and students worldwide. We at the Global Digital Citizen Foundation are proud to be among them. We like to use 6 guidelines for practicing digital citizenship: Respect for self: Having respect for yourself is about being aware of how you portray yourself with your online persona. In doing so, you will set a positive example for others to follow. Responsibility for self: We must be mindful to avoid behavior that puts us at risk, both online and offline. Acting responsibly encourages exemplary personal governance as a habit of mind and adds to our sense of self-worth and self-esteem. Respect for others: Respecting others teaches us the value of being constructive and friendly online. It’s about modeling behavior that focuses on civility and constructive thinking in the face of conflict. Responsibility for others: Don’t be afraid to report abusive and inappropriate behavior towards others. This is how we come to see the value in making others feel protected and valued themselves. Respect for property: Asking permission to share another’s intellectual properties is an important practice. Those who devote their time to creativity in the service of others deserve no less. Learn the rules of “fair use” and copyright laws, and how they apply to sourcing and using online information. Responsibility for property: Treating our property and others’ with care and respect, including intellectual properties, is vital to preserving our digital and global communities. Remember that any kind of digital piracy is still theft and is not a victimless crime. Make a choice to act with integrity and to value what we use or own.
Gemma Ballarín's curator insight, February 19, 8:54 AM
DIGITAL CITIZENSHIP
Rescooped by Amanda McAndrew from Learning Technology News
Scoop.it!

6 Great Videos to Help With Teaching Media Fluency

6 Great Videos to Help With Teaching Media Fluency | InfoLiteracy | Scoop.it
One of the crucial 21st Century Fluencies is Media Fluency, and it’s important to understand what it’s all about. We define it as having the ability to unconsciously interpret the messages in media of all sorts. It includes the ability to communicate and express ourselves in multiple multimedia formats.

Via Nik Peachey
more...
Nik Peachey's curator insight, December 9, 2016 8:23 AM

Some useful content.

Rescooped by Amanda McAndrew from Digital Delights
Scoop.it!

Assessing Learning Outcomes: Thinking Critically about Critical Thinking and Written Communication Skills 


Via Ana Cristina Pratas
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Amanda McAndrew from Learning Technology News
Scoop.it!

13 Tips for Teaching News and Information Literacy

13 Tips for Teaching News and Information Literacy | InfoLiteracy | Scoop.it
How can educators teach elementary and middle school students to be critical consumers of news and media? We asked media literacy experts—teachers and librarians—for their best tips. Here’s what they had to say.

Via Nik Peachey
more...
Nik Peachey's curator insight, August 12, 2:37 AM

Some very usable tips and suggestions.

Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, August 17, 2:22 AM
Teaching News and Information Literacy
Rescooped by Amanda McAndrew from Aprendiendo a Distancia
Scoop.it!

LibGuides: Teacher Resources: Teaching Information Literacy

Resources, lesson plans, app reviews etc. all to help teachers continue to do great work in helping our students succeed! Resources are organized by subject and directly align with the Ontario Curriculum. Resources for teaching information literacy

Via Alfredo Calderón
more...
Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, June 5, 6:53 AM
LibGuides: Teacher Resources: Teaching Information Literacy
Rescooped by Amanda McAndrew from 21st Century Learning and Teaching
Scoop.it!

The Role of Metacognition in Learning and Achievement | #Understanding #LEARNing2LEARN #ModernEDU 

The Role of Metacognition in Learning and Achievement | #Understanding #LEARNing2LEARN #ModernEDU  | InfoLiteracy | Scoop.it
Learning how to think about thinking can help students develop strategies for solving problems and understand tasks at hand.

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?&tag=reflection

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?&tag=Psychology

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?&tag=Metacognition

 


Via Gust MEES
more...
Gust MEES's curator insight, April 18, 1:03 PM
Learning how to think about thinking can help students develop strategies for solving problems and understand tasks at hand.

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?&tag=reflection

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?&tag=Psychology

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?&tag=Metacognition

 

Koen Mattheeuws's curator insight, May 3, 4:10 AM
Een leerkracht vroeg me onlangs wat metacognitie precies betekende en wat de meerwaarde ervan is in het leerproces? Het was het startschot voor een boeiend gesprek over leren. Het was tevens een uitdagende vraag. Ik wil het immers eenvoudig uitleggen zonder afbreuk te doen aan de complexiteit van het begrip. Dit artikel helpt me bij die uitdaging. 
Rescooped by Amanda McAndrew from Learning Technology News
Scoop.it!

To Boost Higher-Order Thinking, Try Curation

To Boost Higher-Order Thinking, Try Curation | InfoLiteracy | Scoop.it
Higher-level thinking has been a core value of educators for decades. We learned about it in college. We hear about it in PD. We’re even evaluated on whether we’re cultivating it in our classrooms

Via Nik Peachey
more...
Kim Flintoff's comment, April 23, 8:35 PM
Identified some of this years ago in: http://clt.curtin.edu.au/events/conferences/tlf/tlf2014/refereed/flintoff.html
Dennis T OConnor's curator insight, April 24, 2:11 PM

Curation activates critical thinking. 

Sarah's curator insight, June 4, 8:20 PM
This is a bit of inception with an article on the benefits of curation, curated into a collection on Scoop It. This article discusses the way that curation can enhance higher order thinking by allowing students understand, analyze and evaluate content matter as they curate it. It gives examples of tasks as well as way to present the information. It is a great resource for planning activities to cultivate higher order thinking.
Rescooped by Amanda McAndrew from Digital Delights for Learners
Scoop.it!

Digital Literacy Resource - A Guide To Doing Research Online

Digital Literacy Resource - A Guide To Doing Research Online | InfoLiteracy | Scoop.it

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Amanda McAndrew from Education Matters
Scoop.it!

Developing Independent Learners: Guiding Students to Be More Resourceful

Developing Independent Learners: Guiding Students to Be More Resourceful | InfoLiteracy | Scoop.it

When you empower students to be classroom experts, they learn to become resources for each other.


Via Roger Francis
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Amanda McAndrew from Transformational Teaching and Technology
Scoop.it!

5 Team Building Games That Can Teach Critical Thinking Skills

5 Team Building Games That Can Teach Critical Thinking Skills | InfoLiteracy | Scoop.it
Here are 5 team building games to try out with your students that also develop critical thinking skills. Collaboration and team spirit await you!

Via Chris Carter
more...
Oskar Almazan's curator insight, March 14, 8:21 AM
Team building games offer students fun opportunities to hone critical skills for success in the modern workplace. Students (and future employees!) that value teamwork are more motivated and creative. They’re also better at problem solving and communicating with one another and have a higher level of trust. We already know students love working in groups. Why not make a game of it?
Andrea Mejia Medina's curator insight, March 18, 12:10 AM
Critical thinking is the most important skill to develop, since in these times of information at hand, we cannot believe everything we see, read, and hear, and that is why it is important to develop this ability as it allows us to be alert and question everything that comes from these means of information. Is a skill that moves a student from concrete ideas to abstract and inferred concepts. Critical thinking allows us to analyze outcomes, compare ideas, identify parallels, sequence events, synthesize information and draw conclusions from a given body of knowledge. Whether it is the proof behind a mathematics formula or an implied tone in an essay, critical thinking skills enable students to solve problems in the real world and on exams in school. Meghan Moll (2014) suggests five tools to develop the critical thinking skills necessary for success on every high school or college test and assignment. 1. Brain games: Recently, websites dedicated to training your brain have enjoyed increased popularity. Lumosity, for example, provides games that aid in improving memory and problem-solving. From timed matching games to order sequence memorization, websites like this can aid in cognition and the ability to ask, "What is the next step?" This skill is critical to learning how to approach complex problems on standardized tests like the ACT and SAT. Rather than playing time-wasting games when you have a lull in your day, search online for brain teasers and peruse the plethora of brain games at your fingertips. 2. Logic puzzles: Before the Internet, puzzles intended to exercise your brain were published in books. Collections of crossword puzzles, logic problems, riddles, sudoku, word problems and word searches can be found at your local bookstore or library. The puzzles in these books are a wonderful strategy to activate different parts of your brain for a round or two of mental gymnastics, and many collections even discuss what each puzzle is meant to target within the mind. 3. Board games: This suggestion may seem strange at first, but do not balk. Choose board games that require more than luck – namely, strategy – for players to win. Any game where players must carefully consider their next move, recognize patterns and remember details will aid in honing critical thinking skills. Certain games like Rubik’s Cube are single-player, while others involve multiple people. Checkers, chess and Mastermind are two-player games that challenge you to plan several steps ahead. Games like Boggle and Scrabble require analyzing information quickly and formulating words, while Clue and Risk test and strengthen your ability to anticipate and react to others’ moves, as well as infer motives. 4. Journaling: Daily reflection – such as maintaining a journal – is a simple way to revisit your day, but it is also a fantastic opportunity to explore ideas. Writing encourages you to expand upon your thoughts and form connections. A journal forces you to slow down and focus on just one or two ideas at a time, which hectic schedules don't otherwise allow. Use your journal to record important ideas and questions and narratives about your life. 5. Book clubs: Students who read for understanding find it far easier to think critically than those who rush to finish. Analyzing a book requires you to delve deeper and ponder complex questions. When reading, think about why the book was written the way it was, what motivates certain characters, and how plot developments may be symbols of foreshadowing. Locate a book club to hone these skills. You will read works you otherwise may not have, and you will learn to examine character development, plot, symbolism and a whole host of other features.
3
Character Minutes's curator insight, May 5, 12:47 PM
Great games to use with "ME Leadership" (Marks of Excellence)
Rescooped by Amanda McAndrew from Transformational Teaching and Technology
Scoop.it!

5 Team Building Games That Can Teach Critical Thinking Skills

5 Team Building Games That Can Teach Critical Thinking Skills | InfoLiteracy | Scoop.it
Here are 5 team building games to try out with your students that also develop critical thinking skills. Collaboration and team spirit await you!

Via Chris Carter
more...
Oskar Almazan's curator insight, March 14, 8:21 AM
Team building games offer students fun opportunities to hone critical skills for success in the modern workplace. Students (and future employees!) that value teamwork are more motivated and creative. They’re also better at problem solving and communicating with one another and have a higher level of trust. We already know students love working in groups. Why not make a game of it?
Andrea Mejia Medina's curator insight, March 18, 12:10 AM
Critical thinking is the most important skill to develop, since in these times of information at hand, we cannot believe everything we see, read, and hear, and that is why it is important to develop this ability as it allows us to be alert and question everything that comes from these means of information. Is a skill that moves a student from concrete ideas to abstract and inferred concepts. Critical thinking allows us to analyze outcomes, compare ideas, identify parallels, sequence events, synthesize information and draw conclusions from a given body of knowledge. Whether it is the proof behind a mathematics formula or an implied tone in an essay, critical thinking skills enable students to solve problems in the real world and on exams in school. Meghan Moll (2014) suggests five tools to develop the critical thinking skills necessary for success on every high school or college test and assignment. 1. Brain games: Recently, websites dedicated to training your brain have enjoyed increased popularity. Lumosity, for example, provides games that aid in improving memory and problem-solving. From timed matching games to order sequence memorization, websites like this can aid in cognition and the ability to ask, "What is the next step?" This skill is critical to learning how to approach complex problems on standardized tests like the ACT and SAT. Rather than playing time-wasting games when you have a lull in your day, search online for brain teasers and peruse the plethora of brain games at your fingertips. 2. Logic puzzles: Before the Internet, puzzles intended to exercise your brain were published in books. Collections of crossword puzzles, logic problems, riddles, sudoku, word problems and word searches can be found at your local bookstore or library. The puzzles in these books are a wonderful strategy to activate different parts of your brain for a round or two of mental gymnastics, and many collections even discuss what each puzzle is meant to target within the mind. 3. Board games: This suggestion may seem strange at first, but do not balk. Choose board games that require more than luck – namely, strategy – for players to win. Any game where players must carefully consider their next move, recognize patterns and remember details will aid in honing critical thinking skills. Certain games like Rubik’s Cube are single-player, while others involve multiple people. Checkers, chess and Mastermind are two-player games that challenge you to plan several steps ahead. Games like Boggle and Scrabble require analyzing information quickly and formulating words, while Clue and Risk test and strengthen your ability to anticipate and react to others’ moves, as well as infer motives. 4. Journaling: Daily reflection – such as maintaining a journal – is a simple way to revisit your day, but it is also a fantastic opportunity to explore ideas. Writing encourages you to expand upon your thoughts and form connections. A journal forces you to slow down and focus on just one or two ideas at a time, which hectic schedules don't otherwise allow. Use your journal to record important ideas and questions and narratives about your life. 5. Book clubs: Students who read for understanding find it far easier to think critically than those who rush to finish. Analyzing a book requires you to delve deeper and ponder complex questions. When reading, think about why the book was written the way it was, what motivates certain characters, and how plot developments may be symbols of foreshadowing. Locate a book club to hone these skills. You will read works you otherwise may not have, and you will learn to examine character development, plot, symbolism and a whole host of other features.
3
Character Minutes's curator insight, May 5, 12:47 PM
Great games to use with "ME Leadership" (Marks of Excellence)
Rescooped by Amanda McAndrew from iPads, MakerEd and More in Education
Scoop.it!

UNESCO Launches Five Laws of Media and Information Literacy (MIL) — @joycevalenza NeverEndingSearch

UNESCO Launches Five Laws of Media and Information Literacy (MIL) — @joycevalenza NeverEndingSearch | InfoLiteracy | Scoop.it
This week UNESCO launched a framework illustrating its Five Laws of Media and Information Literacy (MIL).
This global strategy marries the large, but often separated, disciplines of information literacy and media literacy and creates a common vocabulary for folks in multiple areas of knowledge to engage in conversation. It also positions these critical literacies as a combined set of competencies–knowledge, skills and attitudes–central for living and working in our world today.

Via John Evans
more...
Stewart-Marshall's curator insight, February 22, 6:18 AM
UNESCO has launched a framework illustrating its Five Laws of Media and Information Literacy (MIL).
Willem Kuypers's curator insight, February 27, 2:01 AM
Information Literacy est la future base du savoir.
Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, February 27, 5:52 AM
Five Laws of Media and Information Literacy (MIL)
Rescooped by Amanda McAndrew from iGeneration - 21st Century Education (Pedagogy & Digital Innovation)
Scoop.it!

The Critical Thinking Skills Cheatsheet [Infographic] via GDC

The Critical Thinking Skills Cheatsheet [Infographic] via GDC | InfoLiteracy | Scoop.it
We'd like to share this critical thinking skills cheatsheet for you to use with your students. Get them asking questions on any topic!

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
more...
Lee Hall's curator insight, April 4, 9:35 AM
Help your students with their critical thinking skills. 
Heather Temske's curator insight, April 4, 10:35 PM
I think this could be very useful. 
Character Minutes's curator insight, May 5, 12:34 PM
Great tool for teachers to use in the classroom.