Infinite universe cosmology
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Infinite universe cosmology
Proposition: it has always existed, will always exist, and goes on forever in all directions?
Curated by John McLintock
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Science Communication in Nancy, France | Guest Blog, Scientific American Blog Network

Science Communication in Nancy, France | Guest Blog, Scientific American Blog Network | Infinite universe cosmology | Scoop.it
The International Conference on Science Communication kicks off today in Nancy, France. Named after the famed French physicist Hubert Curien, “the Journées Hubert Curien de ...
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Hot DOG surprise reveals new stage in galaxy evolution - space - 30 August 2012 - New Scientist

Hot DOG surprise reveals new stage in galaxy evolution - space - 30 August 2012 - New Scientist | Infinite universe cosmology | Scoop.it
The discovery of hot dust-obscured galaxies could help answer an old riddle: which came first, galaxies or black holes?
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Most distant black hole 'heard' munching star - space - 02 August 2012 - New Scientist

Most distant black hole 'heard' munching star - space - 02 August 2012 - New Scientist | Infinite universe cosmology | Scoop.it
The wobbles in energy produced when a far-away black hole consumes a star could help test Einstein's general relativity...
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Astronomy Picture of the Day

Astronomy Picture of the Day | Infinite universe cosmology | Scoop.it
A different astronomy and space science
related image is featured each day, along with a brief explanation.
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Two dead stars provide low-tech way to test Einstein - space - 31 August 2012 - New Scientist

Two dead stars provide low-tech way to test Einstein - space - 31 August 2012 - New Scientist | Infinite universe cosmology | Scoop.it
The orbit of a binary star system is changing so quickly due to gravitational waves that you could measure it with your wristwatch...
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