Incorporating Indigenous Cultures into the Technologies Curriculum
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Incorporating Indigenous Cultures into the Technologies Curriculum
Incorporating Indigenous Cultures into the Technologies Curriculum
This is my curation of resources, ideas and information that I have found online that will help teachers to include the cross curriculum priority of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander histories and cultures into the Technologies Curriculum.
Curated by Chris Gilbert
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Message Sticks: rich ways of weaving Aboriginal cultures into the Australian Curriculum

Message Sticks: rich ways of weaving Aboriginal cultures into the Australian Curriculum | Incorporating Indigenous Cultures into the Technologies Curriculum | Scoop.it
In terms of classroom learning and the Australian Curriculum, the exploration of message sticks brings together history, science, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander histories and cultures, liter...
Chris Gilbert's insight:

Discussing message sticks in the classroom can help young children reflect on how technology was shaped by its context as well as the impact of changing technology. This article written by Narinda Sandry (2012) discusses the history of message sticks and suggest ways they can be used to incorporate Aboriginal culture into the numerous areas of the Australian Curriculum. Message sticks could even be compared to other communication based technology such as morse code, telegrams, mobile phones and the internet. One part of the curriculum this would help to teach would be in years 5-6 with students identifying a range of technologies and evaluating their impact locally and globally (ACARA, 2013). However, other parts of the curriculum could be taught using this activity as well, including how contexts shape technology.

 

References

 

 Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority. (2013). Draft Australian Curriculum: Technologies (p. 16). Retrieved from http://consultation.australiancurriculum.edu.au/Static/docs/Technologies/Draft%20Australian%20Curriculum%20Technologies%20-%20February%202013.pdf

 

Sandry, N. (2012, November 6). Message sticks: rich ways of weaving Aboriginal cultures into the Australian Curriculum [Web log post]. Retrieved from http://qmtalksscience.wordpress.com/2012/11/06/message-sticks-rich-ways-of-weaving-aboriginal-cultures-into-the-australian-curriculum/

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Yulunga: Traditional Indigenous Games

Chris Gilbert's insight:

'Yulunga: Traditional Indigenous Games' is a booklet created by the Australian Sports Commission (2009) which explains numerous traditional Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander games. Under each activity, the traditional equipment that was used is described as well as what could be used in modern classrooms to ensure safety guidelines are followed when these games are played by students. By modifying the use of everyday items to create sports equipment for these games, students in the foundation level through to year two can use equipment and materials to play with and produce designed solutions for particular personal needs (ACARA, 2013). These fun games can also be included in a number of other areas of the technologies curriculum all the way up to year ten.

 

References

 

Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority. (2013). Draft Australian Curriculum: Technologies (p.32). Retrieved from http://consultation.australiancurriculum.edu.au/Static/docs/Technologies/Draft%20Australian%20Curriculum%20Technologies%20-%20February%202013.pdf

 

Australian Sports Commission. (2009). Yulunga: Australian Sports Commission. Retrieved June 8, 2013, from http://www.ausport.gov.au/__data/assets/pdf_file/0011/376139/SP_31864_TIG_resource_K-3.pdf

 

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Aboriginal Use of Native Plants WebQuest

Aboriginal Use of Native Plants WebQuest | Incorporating Indigenous Cultures into the Technologies Curriculum | Scoop.it
Chris Gilbert's insight:

'Our Indigenous Garden' is a webquest created by the UniServe Science (2008) department of the University of Sydney. The webquest requires students to create a garden that demonstrates how Aboriginal people utilise native plants. The students have the choice to explore one of the few roles that make use of native plants while they also explain how food and fibre is produced in dynamic systems, which in part of year 7-8 technologies curriculum (ACARA, 2013). While the actual webquest needs to be simplified for the younger year levels, the actual creation of the native garden is a fun activity for all age groups. A webquest could also be used to introduce Indigenous shelter or hunting tools.

 

References

 

Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority. (2013). Draft Australian Curriculum: Technologies (p.32). Retrieved from http://consultation.australiancurriculum.edu.au/Static/docs/Technologies/Draft%20Australian%20Curriculum%20Technologies%20-%20February%202013.pdf

 

UniServe Science. (2008). Our Indigenous Garden [Webquest]. Retrieved June 6, 2013, from http://sydney.edu.au/science/uniserve_science/school/quests/nativeplants.html#intro

 

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Tangentyere Indigenous Environmental Education Program

Tangentyere Indigenous Environmental Education Program | Incorporating Indigenous Cultures into the Technologies Curriculum | Scoop.it

Tangentyere Landcare's Land & Learning project is an environmental education program for Aboriginal children in central Australian communities. The Land & Learning program teaches traditional indigenous knowledge and 'western' science, and links to the NT Curriculum Framework.

Chris Gilbert's insight:

The Tangentyere Landcare's Land & Learning project (n.d) website provides ideas for teachers about different activities in relation to Indigenous knowledges and technology especially in regards to sustainability and land management. While some of the activities may only be possible in certain contexts and with the help of elders, other activities that are suggested such as scavenger hunts for materials and the creation of a bushtucker book allow students to study certain areas of the Australian Technologies Curriculum. These aspects of the curriculum include investigating the sustainability of technologies in years 3-4 and the study of food and fibre production throughout all year levels (ACARA, 2013).

 

 

References

 

Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority. (2013). Draft Australian Curriculum: Technologies (p. 32). Retrieved from http://consultation.australiancurriculum.edu.au/Static/docs/Technologies/Draft%20Australian%20Curriculum%20Technologies%20-%20February%202013.pdf

 

Tangentyere Landcare's land & learning project. (n.d.). Tangentyere Landcare's land & learning project. Retrieved June 3, 2012, from http://www.schools.nt.edu.au/tlcland/index.html

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Explore Indigenous Australian Objects - Australian Museum

Explore Indigenous Australian Objects - Australian Museum | Incorporating Indigenous Cultures into the Technologies Curriculum | Scoop.it
Discover unique objects from around Australia. Toys, tools, decorative and ceremonial artefacts from the Australian Museum's Indigenous collection up close and in detail.
Chris Gilbert's insight:

This informative section of the Australian Museum (n.d.) website gives details on a number of technologies Indigenous Australians created including toys, some of which non-Indigenous children might find familiar. Unlike other resources that I have located that also list a number of technologies, the great thing about this webpage is that it gives a detailed description of how each piece of technology utilises engineering principles and systems including force, motion and energy, as is the case with the Indigenous spinning top. By studying and possibly recreating some of the engineering principles, parts of the design and technologies strand, especially the knowledges and understandings, can be taught from as early as the foundation year level (ACARA, 2013).

 

References

 

Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority. (2013). Draft Australian Curriculum: Technologies (p. 32). Retrieved from http://consultation.australiancurriculum.edu.au/Static/docs/Technologies/Draft%20Australian%20Curriculum%20Technologies%20-%20February%202013.pdf

 

Australian Museum. (n.d.). Explore Indigenous Australian objects. Retrieved. May 27, 2013, from http://australianmuseum.net.au/Explore-Indigenous-Australian-Objects

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Lucy Wareham's comment, June 5, 2013 2:35 AM
This is a very informative site that I would use in the Technology classroom. It would align with ACARA's 8.2 Understand the ways in which products,
services and environments evolve locally and
globally through creativity, innovation and
enterprise.
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Canoes and culture at Saltwater Freshwater for Australia Day

Canoes and culture at Saltwater Freshwater for Australia Day | Incorporating Indigenous Cultures into the Technologies Curriculum | Scoop.it
On Friday 25 January David Payne and I made our way north to Taree from Sydney. With one of David’s derivative plywood nardan (or derrka) strapped to the roof, and sheets of stringy bark in the boo...
Chris Gilbert's insight:

Written by Daina Fletcher (2013) from the Australian National Maritime Museum, the blog post reflects on her time at the Freshwater Festival where she witnessed a canoe building workshop run by local Indigenous elders. The activity she observed would make for an enjoyable classroom activity with students not only constructing a canoe but also exploring how the bark used made the canoe float. This would help students to develop knowledge and skills in a number of areas of the technologies curriculum, particularly in regards to the 'Materials and Technologies Specialisations' section in years F-4 as they investigate the effectiveness of materials to support local community needs (ACARA, 2013).

 

References

 

 Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority. (2013). Draft Australian Curriculum: Technologies (p. 16). Retrieved from http://consultation.australiancurriculum.edu.au/Static/docs/Technologies/Draft%20Australian%20Curriculum%20Technologies%20-%20February%202013.pdf

 

Fletcher, D. (2013, Friday 25). Canoes and culture at Saltwater Freshwater for Australia Day [Web blog post]. Retrieved March 8, 2013, from http://anmm.wordpress.com/2013/02/18/canoes-and-culture-at-saltwater-freshwater-for-australia-day/

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Aboriginal water values and management in northern Australia

CSIRO, as part of the Tropical Rivers and Coastal Knowledge (TRaCK) research program, documented and quantified Aboriginal social and economic values of aqua...
Chris Gilbert's insight:

Produced by the CSIRO (2013), this video is narrated by the traditional owner of the Daly River catchment, Patricia Marrfurra McTaggart, and focuses on a three year study of the social and economic values of water resources to the Aboriginal people. The narrator explores how changing technology in Australia including farm irrigation is putting pressure on the water resources, which in turn is putting parts of their culture such as fishing and hunting at risk. These important issues can be used in years 5-6 as a starting point on a discussion about how sustainable resource management is important for food and fibre production (ACARA, 2013).

 

References

 

 Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority. (2013). Draft Australian Curriculum: Technologies (p. 16). Retrieved from http://consultation.australiancurriculum.edu.au/Static/docs/Technologies/Draft%20Australian%20Curriculum%20Technologies%20-%20February%202013.pdf

 

CSIRO. (Producer). (2013, February 10). Aboriginal water values and management in northern Australia [Video]. Retrieved March 6, 2013, from http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XMKYybtUJ-o&feature=youtu.be

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Catalogue of the Roth Collection of Aboriginal Artefacts from North Queensland

Chris Gilbert's insight:

This catalogue compiled by Kate Khan (2003) details the artefacts of the Roth collection from North Queensland, which was compiled by Dr Walter Edmund Roth between 1898 and 1904. Probably the best part of the catalogue is that not only does it describe items such as woven bags and armbands, but it actually provides details on how they were made through the use of diagrams. The creation of these items could be replicated in classrooms using these instructions by either using the original materials or by using more modern materials which may be easier for younger students to manipulate. The creation of these items would assist students in learning technical skills such as joining techniques, part of the planning, producing and evaluating designed solutions section of the technologies curriculum (ACARA, 2013).

 

References

 

Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority. (2013). Draft Australian Curriculum: Technologies (p.32). Retrieved from http://consultation.australiancurriculum.edu.au/Static/docs/Technologies/Draft%20Australian%20Curriculum%20Technologies%20-%20February%202013.pdf

 

Khan, K. (2003). Catalogue of the Roth collection of Aboriginal artefacts from North Queensland (Technical reports of the Australian Museum). Retrieved from http://australianmuseum.net.au/Uploads/Journals/17949/1371_complete.pdf

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Indigenous Eel Farming

Indigenous Eel Farming | Incorporating Indigenous Cultures into the Technologies Curriculum | Scoop.it
ABC Learn is the Australian Broadcasting Corporation's gateway to the ABC's key educational websites and email newsletters.
Chris Gilbert's insight:

The three minute video clip from the Australian Broadcasting Corporation (2003) shows the remains of what is believed to be a sophisticated network of water channels and rock structures designed to trap eels in south-west Victoria. These would be some of the oldest structures of their kind if they are proven to have existed and would have been at the forefront of innovation. A valuable lesson for year seven to eight students would be to construct a model of a similiar network of waterways used to catch food, which would allow them to understand how environments are altered and continually evolve though innovation and enterprise (ACARA, 2013).

 

References

 

Australian Broadcasting Corporation. (Producer). (2003, March 13). Indigenous Eel Farming [Video]. Retrieved from http://abceducation.net.au/videolibrary/view/indigenous-eel-farming-50

 

Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority. (2013). Draft Australian Curriculum: Technologies (p.32). Retrieved from http://consultation.australiancurriculum.edu.au/Static/docs/Technologies/Draft%20Australian%20Curriculum%20Technologies%20-%20February%202013.pdf

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Teaching activities | My Place for teachers

Teaching activities | My Place for teachers | Incorporating Indigenous Cultures into the Technologies Curriculum | Scoop.it

The Teaching activities provide suggested teaching strategies to support the use of the My Place TV series in the classroom. Focusing on video clips and associated stills, the teaching activities reflect and support the Australian Curriculum objectives for studies in both History and English for years 3–6.

Chris Gilbert's insight:

Based on the book 'My Place' by Nadia Wheatly (1988), a TV series with the same name has been produced by the Australian Children's Television Foundation (n.d.) in partnership with Education Services Australia Ltd. This website provides clips from the show as well as activities teachers can implement based on each of these clips including the introduction of many Indigenous technologies. There are many other clips that look at the technology used by European settlers when they arrived in Australia, allowing teachers to help students examine the effect each one had on the environment and on the local Indigenous culture. Exploring and critiquing technologies as well as exploring the impact of their use locally and globally  is part of the Australian Technologies Curriculum from the foundation year level up to year ten (ACARA, 2013).

 

References

 

 Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority. (2013). Draft Australian Curriculum: Technologies (p.32). Retrieved from http://consultation.australiancurriculum.edu.au/Static/docs/Technologies/Draft%20Australian%20Curriculum%20Technologies%20-%20February%202013.pdf

 

Australian Children's Television Foundation. (n.d.). My Place for Teachers. Retrieved June 5, 2013, from http://www.myplace.edu.au/contact_us.html

 

Wheatley, N. (1988). My Place. Newtown, NSW: Walker Books Australia.

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Indigenous Children Connect Across the Globe Through Technology

The First Peoples' Project was an initiative of iEARN, the International Education and Resource Network. The project used new technologies to enable students...
Chris Gilbert's insight:

Produced by Edutopia (2012), this video explores the 'The First Peoples' Project', which sees Indigenous students from five continents share information  between each other about their culture, including different tools they used and games they played. This is a great initiative that  includes the use of digital technologies to look into how different cultures around the world created technology in the past to meet their cultural needs. A similiar activity could be set up between other schools and would help Australian students realise that factors including social and cultural values impact on the design of products, all part of the technologies and society section of the technologies curriculum (ACARA, 2013). The digital technologies strand of the curriculum can also be incoporated by implementing this activity as students create and share information with known audiences using a range of communication tools (ACARA, 2013).

 

References

 

Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority. (2013). Draft Australian Curriculum: Technologies. Retrieved from http://consultation.australiancurriculum.edu.au/Static/docs/Technologies/Draft%20Australian%20Curriculum%20Technologies%20-%20February%202013.pdf

 

Edutopia. (Producer). (2012, April 10). Indigenous Children Connect Across the Globe Through Technology [Video]. Retrieved from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r_PrSD8fKm0

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Australian Indigenous tools and technology - australia.gov.au

Australian Indigenous tools and technology - australia.gov.au | Incorporating Indigenous Cultures into the Technologies Curriculum | Scoop.it

The key to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander technologies is both their intimate understanding of the natural environment as well as their skills in designing artefacts that were flexible and adaptable.

Chris Gilbert's insight:

With great information on a range of Indigenous technology including weapons, communication tools, nets, baskets, watercraft and shelter, this webpage published by the Australian government (2007) is a great source of information. As well as providing links to other websites that deal with each specific technology, this webpage explores the problems Indigenous Australians faced which caused them to develop each technology and use specific materials. For example, it explains how different materials were used to create shelter throughout Australia depending on what the local weather conditions were. Exploring and investigating these needs and opportunities for designing as well as the appropriate resources used to create these designs is an essential part of the technologies curriuclum throughout every year level (ACARA, 2013).

 

References

 

Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority. (2013). Draft Australian Curriculum: Technologies (p. 32). Retrieved from http://consultation.australiancurriculum.edu.au/Static/docs/Technologies/Draft%20Australian%20Curriculum%20Technologies%20-%20February%202013.pdf

 

Australian Government. (2007). Australian Indigenous tools and technology. Retrieved April 11, 2013, from http://australia.gov.au/about-australia/australian-story/austn-indigenous-tools-and-technology

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Mystery object: Torres Strait Islands

Mystery object: Torres Strait Islands | Incorporating Indigenous Cultures into the Technologies Curriculum | Scoop.it

Using the clues, try to work out what the mystery object is from the Torres Strait Islands.

Chris Gilbert's insight:

'Mystery object: Torres Strait Islands' is an interactive activity developed by the Curriculum Corporation (2006) and is a fun way of teaching students about Indigenous technology. I have created guessing type games before, especially in mathematics, where students have to guess a hidden 3D shape based on how many edges, faces and corners they can feel. These activities help students appreciate and remember the properties of 3D shapes, and I believe this activity would also help students to remember the relationship between the Torres Strait Island community and the headdress technology. This relationship is very important within the technologies curriculum, with 'Technologies and society' making up part of the Design and Technologies Knowledge and Understanding strand of the curriculum (ACARA, 2013).This activity can also be replicated using other technologies through either an ICT based activity like this one or by using an actual object in the classroom and revealing bit by bit part of its history, use and design.

 

References

 

 Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority. (2013). Draft Australian Curriculum: Technologies (p. 16). Retrieved from http://consultation.australiancurriculum.edu.au/Static/docs/Technologies/Draft%20Australian%20Curriculum%20Technologies%20-%20February%202013.pdf

 

Curriculum Corporation. (2006). Mystery object: Torres Strait Islands [Flash game]. Retrieved March 6, 2013, from http://www.nma.gov.au/interactives/tlf/tsi/index.html

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Aboriginal Technology - Learning Sequence 1

Aboriginal Technology - Learning Sequence 1 | Incorporating Indigenous Cultures into the Technologies Curriculum | Scoop.it

A lesson sequence from the Board of Studies NSW about Aboriginal Technology.

Chris Gilbert's insight:

This web page created by the Board of Studies NSW (n.d.) is a great resource to use when incorporating Aboriginal histories and cultures into the Australian Technologies Curriculum. While the lesson sequence is designed to be used with the NSW currriculum and may need adjustment to suit the Australian Curriculum, the page gives some great ideas on activities that could be used as well as links to other great sites about Indigenous technology and photos that could be displayed on an IWB. The outcomes of this unit are for year five and six students and list a number of areas of the NSW technology curriculum that taught.

 

References

 

Board of Studies NSW. (n.d.). Aboriginal technology. Retrieved March 3, 2012, from http://k6.boardofstudies.nsw.edu.au/linkages/IntegratedUnits/aboriginal/tech_learn01.html

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Marsha Farr's curator insight, April 3, 2013 6:34 PM

This is a an intergrated unit design for Stage 3- Years 5 and 6 NSW Curriculum the unit covers English, HSIE, Maths, Science and technology with the greatest emphasis on the science and technology sector. There are various links to be made to the Australian curriculum this unit will address the technology

Australian Curriculum- Years 5 and 6 Outcome- 6.1 Identify how designers and technologists address competing considerations and tradeoffsin the design of products, services,environments and systems.

Links, activities and infromation could be utilised for other year levels.

This unit has the added benefit of addressing the cross-curricular priorty - Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander histories and cultures.

Kia Sowden's comment, May 11, 2013 1:19 AM
Exploring Indigenous Technologies is also a great tool for delivering the curriculum. Also, it ensures that the Cross Curriculum Priority of Indigenous Perspectives is being covered.