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The Land Rights of Small Farmers and Indigenous Communities: The Solution to Climate Change Is in Our Lands

The Land Rights of Small Farmers and Indigenous Communities: The Solution to Climate Change Is in Our Lands | Indigenous People | Scoop.it
A global effort to give small farmers and indigenous communities control over lands is the best hope we have to deal with climate change and feed the world’s growing population. As governments conv...
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Spokane's Hazen Audel taps skills of indigenous people for Survive the Tribe ... - The Spokesman Review

Spokane's Hazen Audel taps skills of indigenous people for Survive the Tribe ... - The Spokesman Review | Indigenous People | Scoop.it
Spiders and snakes were more inspiring than school to Hazen Audel as he grew up in Spokane. “My high school teachers would never have bet that I’d become a science teacher myself,” he said.
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Indigenous Guatemalans Create Political Platform for 2015 Elections

Indigenous Guatemalans Create Political Platform for 2015 Elections | Indigenous People | Scoop.it
Upside Down World
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Indigenous recognition call in NSW

Indigenous recognition call in NSW | Indigenous People | Scoop.it
New South Wales becomes the first state government to support a referendum to change the constitution to recognise indigenous Australians.
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What's in Store for the New Assembly of First Nations Chief? | The Tyee

What's in Store for the New Assembly of First Nations Chief? | The Tyee | Indigenous People | Scoop.it
Leader has work cut out for him: BC chief.
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UN call to abolish mandatory sentencing rejected by WA and NT

UN call to abolish mandatory sentencing rejected by WA and NT | Indigenous People | Scoop.it
Western Australia and the Northern Territory say they won’t change laws that have been criticised for putting too many Indigenous Australians behind bars
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Peruvian Protester: My Brother Was Disappeared in 1993 at El Pentagonito, the Site of Climate Summit

Peruvian Protester: My Brother Was Disappeared in 1993 at El Pentagonito, the Site of Climate Summit | Indigenous People | Scoop.it
The U.N. climate summit in Lima is being held at the Peruvian army headquarters, known as "El Pentagonito." It is a site with a dark history, built in 1975 by the dictator Juan Velasco Alvarado. The army, under President Alberto Fujimori, later used the base to torture and interrogate political prisoners. We speak with Marly Anzualdo Castro, whose brother, Kenneth Anzualdo Castro, was disappeared in 1993 during Fujimori’s reign. Last year, the Inter-American Court of Human Rights determined the state was responsible for Kenneth’s forced disappearance. To this date, his whereabouts remain unknown. Anzualdo Castro joined Wednesday’s climate march in Lima holding a sign reading "No Olvidamos," which means "We don’t forget." Anzualdo Castro says her brother was committed to student activism. "I join young people today [at the climate protest] because my brother had that spirit," Anzualdo Castro says. "So for me it is a way to see him alive now."
Transcript

This is a rush transcript. Copy may not be in its final form.

AMY GOODMAN: Yes, we are broadcasting from the COP 20. The summit is being held at the Peruvian army headquarters, known as "El Pentagonito." It’s a site with a dark history. It was built in 1975 by the dictator Juan Velasco Alvarado. The army, under President Alberto Fujimori, later used the base to torture and interrogate political prisoners.

One of the people who joined the march against the World Climate Summit on Wednesday was Marly Anzualdo Castro, who held a sign reading "No Olvidamos," "We don’t forget," with a picture of El Pentagonito. Her brother, Kenneth, was disappeared in 1993 during the reign of Fujimori. Last year, the Inter-American Court of Human Rights determined the state was responsible for his forced disappearance. The court found state agents kidnapped Anzualdo Castro and brought him to the basement of Peru’s Army Intelligence Service, known as SIE, located here at El Pentagonito. To this date, his whereabouts remain unknown. On Wednesday, Marly Anzualdo Castro spoke to Democracy Now!’s Renée Feltz.

MARLY ANZUALDO CASTRO: [translated] My name is Marly Anzualdo Castro. I’m the sister of Kenneth Anzualdo Castro. He was a student who disappeared 21 years ago in the Pentagonito. I’m also here because they are murdering nature, and also because the peasant leaders who are struggling for water are also being killed. The same thing happened years ago, when young people fought for student welfare and opposed what the government did at that time. They were kidnapped and disappeared. Currently, there is a trial in the criminal division of the Callao naval base for the forced disappearance of two students, including my brother, and a teacher who was a professor at the University of San Cristóbal de Huamanga of Ayacucho.

RENÉE FELTZ: Can you tell us what exactly happened to your brother, and why was he targeted?

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Peru’s Deadly Environment: Host Nation of U.N. Summit is Among Most Dangerous for Land Defenders

Peru’s Deadly Environment: Host Nation of U.N. Summit is Among Most Dangerous for Land Defenders | Indigenous People | Scoop.it

The United Nations Climate Conference is being held in Peru, which is now the world’s fourth most dangerous country for environmental defenders. Four were killed in September alone. In a brutal incident in a remote region of Peru’s Amazon rainforest, leading indigenous activist Edwin Chota was ambushed as he traveled to neighboring Brazil for a meeting on how to address the region’s illegal logging crisis. Illegal loggers allegedly killed and dismembered Chota along with his colleagues Jorge Ríos, Francisco Pinedo and Leoncio Quinticima. Chota is among at least 57 environmental activists who have been assassinated in Peru since 2002. The Peruvian government has recently passed legislation that rolls back forest protections, which has increased the pace of such murders. We are joined by Chris Moye, the environmental governance campaigner for Global Witness and author of their new report, "Peru’s Deadly Environment."

Transcript

This is a rush transcript. Copy may not be in its final form.

AMY GOODMAN: We’re broadcasting from Lima, Peru, where the United Nations Climate Change Conference is underway. The protests against the summit on Wednesday fell on International Human Rights Day, which seems fitting, because Peru is now the fourth most dangerous country for environmental defenders, with four killed in September alone. In a brutal incident in a remote region of Peru’s Amazon rainforest, a leading indigenous activist named Edwin Chota was ambushed as he traveled to neighboring Brazil for a meeting on how to address the region’s illegal logging crisis. It was those same illegal loggers who allegedly killed and dismembered Chota along with his colleagues, Jorge Ríos, Francisco Pinedo and Leoncio Quinticima. This is Edwin Chota speaking about how his life had been repeatedly threatened.

EDWIN CHOTA: [translated] There are good business people, but there are others who are only evil, who threaten to kill. We are threatened, but we welcome death. Why? For the defense of our nature, our life and our children’s future. The law has not yet come to us. We do not feel the law, and our villagers are threatened, threatened because we do not take this.

AMY GOODMAN: In fact, that was Edwin Chota. We’re going to turn right now to Chris Moye, the environmental governance campaigner for Global Witness. He’s here at the climate conference, author of a new report called "Peru’s Deadly Environment." I asked him to lay out his findings.

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Popular Resistance sur Twitter

Popular Resistance sur Twitter | Indigenous People | Scoop.it
#Amazon Indigenous prepared to fight if companies enter their territories to explore for oil!
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Indigenous imprisonment rates still rising, figures show - The Guardian (blog)

Indigenous imprisonment rates still rising, figures show - The Guardian (blog) | Indigenous People | Scoop.it
The number of Indigenous Australians in prison has grown by more than 80% in 10 years and the overall imprisonment rate is rising, figures show
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Spotlight on murders of activists as Peru prepares for Lima climate talks

Spotlight on murders of activists as Peru prepares for Lima climate talks | Indigenous People | Scoop.it
Government accused of neglecting people defending their land and forests against mining and illegal logging
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ON INTERNATIONAL HUMAN RIGHTS DAY, THE FIGHT FOR INDIGENOUS LAND AND AUTONOMY IN HONDURAS

ON INTERNATIONAL HUMAN RIGHTS DAY, THE FIGHT FOR INDIGENOUS LAND AND AUTONOMY IN HONDURAS | Indigenous People | Scoop.it
By Stephen Bartlett, Agricultural Missions and US Food Sovereignty Alliance, and Beverly Bell, Other Worlds

Photos by Steve Pavey

What’s at stake for Hondura…
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Indigenous leaders form new national body to reclaim rights and voice - The Guardian

Indigenous leaders form new national body to reclaim rights and voice - The Guardian | Indigenous People | Scoop.it
Delegates at ‘freedom summit’ establish 20-person representative committee similar to the former Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander commission
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The Land Rights of Small Farmers and Indigenous Communities: The Solution to Climate Change Is in Our Lands

The Land Rights of Small Farmers and Indigenous Communities: The Solution to Climate Change Is in Our Lands | Indigenous People | Scoop.it
A global effort to give small farmers and indigenous communities control over lands is the best hope we have to deal with climate change and feed the world’s growing population. As governments conv...
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Helen Clark: Speech at High level event on Indigenous Peoples Proposals to Address Climate Change UN Climate Change Conference – COP20, Lima, Peru | UNDP

Helen Clark: Speech at High level event on Indigenous Peoples Proposals to Address Climate Change UN Climate Change Conference – COP20, Lima, Peru | UNDP | Indigenous People | Scoop.it
09 Dec 2014

I am pleased to welcome you to this high-level event dedicated to the very important role played by indigenous peoples in addressing climate change.

Today’s event occurs just a few weeks after the World Conference on Indigenous Peoples and the UN Secretary-General’s Climate Summit in New York. At both these major meetings, indigenous peoples’ leadership and contributions were highly visible and widely acknowledged. Now these major meetings on climate change in Lima provide another important opportunity to highlight the crucial role of indigenous peoples in addressing climate change.

I thank the representatives of the indigenous people’s organizations on the panel for joining us today: your presentations on how indigenous peoples have been tackling climate change are of high relevance to the discussions here at the COP.

I commend the Ministry of Environment of Peru for its commitment to the participation of indigenous peoples during this conference of parties.

I thank the Ministry of Climate and Environment of Norway for helping to fund the participation of indigenous peoples here in and the Indigenous Peoples Pavilion. UNDP has been pleased to help facilitate this participation.

Indigenous peoples are among those most affected by the impacts of climate change, because of their dependence upon and close relationship with the environment and its resources. Indigenous communities already face many challenges – these may include outright discrimination, political and economic marginalization, loss of land and resources, human rights violations, and high levels of unemployment. Climate change adds to these challenges.

Indigenous peoples have an historical and a cultural role in the sustainable management of ecosystems. In the face of climate change, those communities have been at the front lines of the response, often reacting to the impacts in creative ways, and by drawing on traditional knowledge and experiences.

The participation of indigenous peoples’ organizations at the September Climate Summit in New York in both the plenary and the Forests Pavilion was a highlight of the strengthened global partnership which is emerging to protect forests and enhance forest restoration.

Indigenous peoples’ leaders at those events clearly articulated the role which their peoples are playing in the sustainable management of more than four hundred million hectares of the world’s forests. They reminded us that indigenous peoples often put their lives on the line to protect the forests – and that the world benefits from that stewardship. They also clearly articulated the kind of support indigenous peoples need to keep playing a leading role in climate change mitigation.

It is important to acknowledge that many indigenous peoples have not yet experienced the full realization of their rights. It is also deeply tragic that indigenous peoples’ rights advocates are losing their lives as they campaign for their rights. I express my solidarity with the families of all those who have perished in the course of fighting to protect the forests and advance their rights.

I very much hope that the significant participation of indigenous peoples at the Climate Summit and at this COP puts us on a path towards a new era where there is respect for indigenous peoples’ rights.

Indigenous people will play a major role in ensuring the success of one of the most promising global climate change mitigation measures - Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation (REDD+). The majority of the world’s remaining forests in developing countries are located where indigenous peoples live, and often lie within their ancestral and customary lands.

Through a range of initiatives, UNDP gives specific attention to the role of indigenous peoples and their traditional knowledge when addressing environmental degradation and climate change. Our work includes:

• the UNDP-GEF Small Grants Programme (SGP), which provides financial and technical support to communities to conserve and restore their environments while also enhancing their well-being and livelihoods.

• the Equator Initiative, which highlights best practice examples of indigenous and local initiatives aimed at protecting their environment and reducing poverty.

• the UN-REDD Programme’s newly established Community-based REDD+ Initiative, which will provide grants to indigenous and local communities to empower them to engage in REDD+ processes.

UNDP is committed to ensuring that the voices of indigenous peoples are heard and their needs are respected. We are committed to the effective participation of indigenous people in decision-making around climate change, including by supporting their representation at COP21 in Paris next year.

To ensure that our programmes help protect and respect indigenous peoples’ rights and territories, UNDP has recently approved a set of Social and Environmental Standards (SES) for its own work. These standards place human rights at their core. They include a specific standard on how we work with indigenous peoples, and related standards on cultural heritage and resettlement and displacement. They are consistent with the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, and they ensure that UNDP will not support initiatives which violate the human rights of indigenous peoples. Any UNDP projects which could potentially have an impact on indigenous peoples groups must be designed in a spirit of partnership with those groups, with their full and effective participation, and with the objective of securing their free, prior, and informed consent.

Conclusion

In conclusion, let me emphasise that UNDP fully recognises the leading role of indigenous peoples in addressing climate change. We are committed to ensuring that this role is acknowledged here at Lima, in Paris, and beyond. We look forward to working with all partners present to that end.
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Kevindoylejones's curator insight, February 4, 2015 8:43 AM

The UN realizes we need indigenous people 2 manage climate change transition

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A picture that speaks every language

A picture that speaks every language | Indigenous People | Scoop.it
An indigenous woman holds her child while trying to resist the advance of Amazonas state policemen in Manaus who have been sent to evict natives.
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Isabella El-Hage's curator insight, March 19, 2015 12:27 PM

This picture and small article links to Unit Three through "indigenous people". This picture was taken in the Brazilian Amazon, showing the state police who were ordered to move out the 200 plus Indigenous peoples in the Landless Movement. These people were staying on a private plot of land, and were trying to fight back using bows and arrows against the police's tear gas and dogs. I think natives in any country should be able to stay were they live, and if they must be moved they should be granted a piece of land, not just kicked out. This connects to how American settlers kicked out the Native Americans when settling and colonizing America. 

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Indigenous people in Peru fighting for land rights - The Hindu

Indigenous people in Peru fighting for land rights - The Hindu | Indigenous People | Scoop.it
State doesn’t have the will to regulate oil extraction, says activist
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Indigenous Speak Up About Climate Threat & Oil Exploration - teleSUR English

Indigenous Speak Up About Climate Threat & Oil Exploration - teleSUR English | Indigenous People | Scoop.it
As Peru’s indigenous people raise concerns about their treatment, and the incursion by U.S. oil companies, they also worry that the COP 20 conference is not listening to the indigenous voice.
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Putting People Before Profit: Thousands March in Peruvian People’s Climate March in Lima

Putting People Before Profit: Thousands March in Peruvian People’s Climate March in Lima | Indigenous People | Scoop.it
On Wednesday, climate justice activists from around world marched in Lima at the people’s climate march. We hear voices from Uganda, Mozambique, Australia, Canada, Peru, Nigeria and more. "We the people have come together to stand up against injustice. We are saying enough is enough," says Godwin Uyi Ojo, executive director of Environmental Rights Action/Friends of the Earth Nigeria. "In the COP, negotiations are taking place. The developed countries are putting profit before people. And we say, ’No, you need to put people first, before profit."
Transcript

This is a rush transcript. Copy may not be in its final form.

AMY GOODMAN: Thousands of people did march in Lima, Peru, here on Wednesday, demanding urgent action on climate change. Democracy Now!’s Deena Guzder and Nermeen Shaikh spoke to some of them.

PROTESTERS: ¿Qué queremos? Justicia climática! ¿Cuando lo queremos? Ahora! ¿Qué queremos? Justicia climática! ¿Cuando lo queremos? Ahora!

ROBERT BAKIIKA: I’m Robert. I’m from Uganda. I work with an environmental NGO. And what we are doing now here is sending a message to the COP that we need climate justice now. We need commitments now. Climate change is affecting the development, is affecting the landscapes, is affecting food security. And manifestation is already there. People are trying to survive in hard conditions. Poverty levels are growing, because people cannot cope up with this changing weather. The developed nations, the way they developed was they polluted the environment, because they are industrialized countries. And when they polluted the environment, they were on their course to development. So what we are telling them now is to reduce their development models, turn to clean energy, follow their commitments they agreed on, reducing greenhouse gases, and also put finances in technology for countries also to achieve the level of development they also need.

TETET LAURON: My name is Tetet Lauron. I’m from IBON International, and I’m from the Philippines. Well, you know, we’ve been hearing message of sympathy from everyone here at the COP, but right now, at the moment, we’re saying that we’ve had enough of the sympathy, and what we need now is genuine solidarity. This is the third COP where the Philippines has been the center of attention because of the super typhoon that has been hitting our country during the time of these climate meetings. So I suppose, you know, the Philippines is the poster child for all climate disasters. But what I’m saying is, it’s the Philippines now, but, you know, we’re just representative of many other vulnerable communities, many other drowning people and drowning communities, but more importantly, many other communities all over the world who are fighting for meaningful solutions to climate change.
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"We Are Like the Walking Dead": Latin American Indigenous Groups Decry Corporate Destruction of Land

"We Are Like the Walking Dead": Latin American Indigenous Groups Decry Corporate Destruction of Land | Indigenous People | Scoop.it

As the United Nations Climate Conference in Peru enters its final phase, thousands of people marched in downtown Lima on Wednesday to call for action on global warming. We hear from some of the voices who took to the streets: frontline indigenous and rural communities from across Latin America who are among the most impacted by both the industrial practices that fuel climate change and the impacts of global warming.

Transcript

This is a rush transcript. Copy may not be in its final form.

AMY GOODMAN: We’re broadcasting from COP 20, the United Nations climate conference in Lima, Peru, where Secretary of State John Kerry is due to arrive today as the talks enter their final two days. The last time a U.S. secretary of state attended the summit was Hillary Clinton in 2009 in Copenhagen. Leaders from about 190 nations are trying to work out a draft deal to limit rising global greenhouse gas emissions ahead of next year’s summit in Paris, where an agreement is expected to be finalized. On Wednesday, the presidents of Peru, Chile, Mexico and Colombia urged negotiators to take significant steps towards combating global warming. This is Chilean President Michelle Bachelet.

PRESIDENT MICHELLE BACHELET: [translated] We know that if we don’t reach an agreement at the next conference in Paris, it’s possible that we will be too late. The success of COP 21 next year will depend to a great degree on the agreements reached here, and that means that we have no right to fail. Future generations will hold us accountable, and with good reason, if we allow this opportunity to go by.

AMY GOODMAN: On Wednesday, thousands of people marched here in downtown Lima, Peru, to call for action on climate change, among them members of Peru’s more than 50 indigenous communities. Across Latin America, indigenous and rural communities are among the most impacted by mining, oil drilling and other extractive industries that fuel global warming. They’re also among those most vulnerable to the effects of climate change. Democracy Now!’s Amy Littlefield spoke to members of those frontline communities. Some had traveled to Lima, Peru, from as far away as Mexico.

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Chiefs call for people to rise up over federal government's transparency act

Chiefs call for people to rise up over federal government's transparency act | Indigenous People | Scoop.it
Chiefs at an Assembly of First Nations meeting are calling for the aboriginal community to rise up against the federal government's transparency law that requires them to disclose their salaries online.
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Stigmabase | AUNZ Review: To end our trauma government must stop the assault on our People and our Culture

Stigmabase | AUNZ Review: To end our trauma government must stop the assault on our People and our Culture | Indigenous People | Scoop.it
#Indigenous - To end our trauma government must stop the assault on our People and our Culture - My colleague… http://t.co/dhdnufXKSd
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No, the world's oldest tree has not been chopped down

No, the world's oldest tree has not been chopped down | Indigenous People | Scoop.it
Reports that the world’s oldest tree has been accidentally chopped down by loggers in Peru has sparked panic among conservationists.
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The Interrelationship between Investment Arbitration, Indigenous Rights, and Environmental Law

The Interrelationship between Investment Arbitration, Indigenous Rights, and Environmental Law | Indigenous People | Scoop.it

The Natural Resources program of CISDL supported by Université de Montréal, Université d’Ottawa and SSHRC, hosted a workshop at the McGill Faculty Club on Tuesday evening. The general theme of the workshop was: The Interrelationship between Investment Arbitration, Indigenous Rights, and Environmental Law. The event was a great success and we thank all those who attended, and especially our distinguished panel of speakers. We are particularly grateful to the presence of world renowned experts on arbitration, Me L. Yves Fortier and Prof Armand de Mestral.

 

Brought together by Natural Resources coordinator Georgios Andriotis, our panel consisted of:

Martin Valasek (Chair) – A leading practitioner in the area of international arbitration, with extensive experience in both investor-State and commercial contract disputes. He has acted as arbitrator, and as tribunal secretary, in several important arbitrations, including the multibillion dollar Yukos Energy Charter Treaty arbitration. Before attending the Faculty of Law at McGill, he studied environmental science at Harvard and then worked for three years as a Policy Advisor in the Corporate Policy Group of Environment Canada. Me Valasek clerked at Supreme Court of Canada, for Justice Charles Gonthier, a founding member of the CISDL.

 

Andrea Bjorklund A professor at McGill University faculty of law and holds the L. Yves Fortier Chair in International Arbitration and International Commercial Law. A renowned expert in international arbitration and litigation, international trade and international investment, she was previously a professor at the University of California (Davis) School of Law and a Bigelow Fellow at the Chicago Law School. Professor Bjorklund has worked on the NAFTA arbitration team in the U.S. Department of State's Office of the Legal Adviser and worked for Commissioner Thelma J. Askey on the U.S. International Trade Commission. Prof. Bjorklund spoke on:

 

The Implications of the Lago Agrio Cases for Indigenous Rights, Environmental Protection and International Investment Law

Annie Lespérance Practices in international arbitration at Cabinet Yves Fortier in Montreal. She is acting as Secretary to Tribunals before the LCIA, the ICC, the ICSID and the CAS. Prior to joining Cabinet Yves Fortier, Annie was Assistant Legal Counsel at the Permanent Court of Arbitration (PCA) in The Hague where she provided legal and administrative support to arbitral tribunals and parties in proceedings administered by the PCA concerning State-to-State, investor-State and international commercial disputes. She is a graduate of University of Montreal and holds an LLM cum laude in international law from Leiden University. She sits on the board of directors of the Canadian Council of International Law and the United Nations Association Canada (Montreal Branch). She is a member of the Quebec and Paris bars. Me Lespérance spoke on:

Striking a Balance between the Protection of Foreign Investments and the Environment: A Necessity for the Legitimacy of the Investment Arbitration System


Konstantia Koutouki A professor of law at Université de Montréal. She examines the links between international trade, intellectual property, and environmental protection. She has extensive experience working on issues concerning international sustainable development law especially as it relates to the social, economic and cultural development of Indigenous and local communities, as well as the preservation of natural spaces. She has first-hand experience with Indigenous and local communities around the world, where she has spent much time as a guest and researcher. She is Lead Counsel for Natural Resources with the Centre for International Sustainable Development Law at McGill University and on the executive of the Canadian branch of the International Law Association and the Canadian Association of Law Teachers. Prof Koutouki spoke on:

Dispute Settlement and Access Benefit Sharing: Arbitration under the Nagoya Protocol


From left to right: Prof Bjorklund, Me Valasek, Me Lespérance

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Obama plan aims to help young American Indians

Obama plan aims to help young American Indians | Indigenous People | Scoop.it
Pledging to fulfill a “sacred responsibility,” President Barack Obama unveiled an initiative Wednesday aimed at improving dire conditions and creating opportunities for American Indian youth, more than a third of whom live in poverty.
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Paraguay: UN expert concerned over indigenous peoples' rights to land, resources - UN News Centre

Paraguay: UN expert concerned over indigenous peoples' rights to land, resources - UN News Centre | Indigenous People | Scoop.it
The United Nations Special Rapporteur on the rights of indigenous peoples identified a number of ongoing challenges remaining in Paraguay as she ended an eight-day official visit to the country on Friday.
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