Indian Photographies
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Visual Culture in the Subcontinent
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Interview | "I simply love the act of searching for an image" – Asim Rafiqui

Interview | "I simply love the act of searching for an image" – Asim Rafiqui | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it

"...Photography gives me a way to voice my protest, make my argument, present my case, and show my sensibilities to others. I had not found another way of doing this. I photograph so that I can share, articulate, debate, argument, and make a case. Photography is an extension of my self, and it allows me to create artifacts which become, as I argued in my introduction to the The Idea of India project [http://www.asimrafiqui.com/blog/], vehicles for the imagination, both human, political and civic. I am a very political individual and as a result a very political photographer. What I mean is that my personal works are always about something more than aesthetics – they are personal, and something very personal is being communicated in them. It may not be obvious what that is, but its there and I often struggle myself to articulate it, but assume that the images along with my writings will reveal it. My works have a point of view, I make specific arguments through them, and I want to communicate specific points of view..."

 

Photograph by Asim Rafiqui

Interview by Mahesh Bhat | http://writingsonphotography.wordpress.com/

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Exhibition in Delhi at Exhibit 320 | 'Postcards from the Interior'

Exhibition in Delhi at Exhibit 320 | 'Postcards from the Interior' | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it

"Indigenous Americans once believed that when a photograph was taken, it stole a piece of the person’s soul. Similar to mirrors, which many cultures regarded as reservoirs of our ‘selves’ and hence felt, if broken, would bring ill luck and disquiet. These beliefs function as powerful metaphors for how images define us—our physical borders, the individual arrangement of our features, and our identity in terms of our differences with others. Recently, Alex Parker, a London-based amateur photographer, took pictures of himself standing with one other person or another—a friend, acquaintance or stranger. He titled the series Me. Tanvi Mishra, a Delhi-based freelance photographer and debut curator, has orchestrated a similarly intimate exhibition, one that gazes at the lives of others, whether it be the artist or his or her subject.A startlingly talented group of photographers explores the theme of self and identity through an intensely personal lens"

Photograph by Ankit Goyal

Article by Janice Pariat | Open Magazine 

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SADAKCHHAP : Exhibiting Art in Public Space

SADAKCHHAP : Exhibiting Art in Public Space | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it
"A street. Your work. An audience.

No application procedure, no entry fee, no complications.

Sadakchaap proposes a public art project in which photographers,visual artists will meet at a given time and space and simply put up their work.

The idea is to make the whole process of art more democratic - free from constraints of whether your work will appeal to a particular gallery, free from the motivation to sell, free from only catering to a particular class.
Here is the chance for you to put up your most meaningful work, meaningful to you personally, not according to a screening committee or anyone else, and to gauge directly the impact your work has on a mixed audience, interacting with them if you choose to.

For its first edition, Sadakchaap proposes a space in the city of Pune, right in the heart of the busy market place, Tulsi Bagh. Photographers are invited to come with their prints at the designated time and put up their work for all to see, comment on and pass judgement! "


Date : 7/1/13

Watch this space for updates and more information.
https://www.facebook.com/humsadakchhap
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Crowfunding | Focus Photo Festival In Mumbai : "Let's Make it Happen"

Crowfunding | Focus Photo Festival In Mumbai : "Let's Make it Happen" | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it

"In today’s world where every initiative from all spheres of profession and passion jostle to grab the limited available resources and funds, very little come by the way of the creative fields.This is where platforms like the global Kickstarter and India’s very own Wishberry come in to help individuals and groups garner funds for their dream creative projects. A Mumbai-based team of four, comprising of Elise Foster Vander Elst, director of Asia Art Projects, consultant Matthieu Foss, architect Nicola Antaki and photographer Fawzan Husain, knows this occurrence only too well as it gears up to host the city’s first non-commercial photography festival — the FOCUS Festival Mumbai..."

 

Support the project here : 

http://www.wishberry.in/FOCUS-Festival-Mumbai-Let-s-make-it-happen--15054

 

Photograph by Fawzan Husain

Article by Satarupa Paul | ARTINFO

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Crowdfunding | 'Don't Breathe' by Ronny Sen

Crowdfunding | 'Don't Breathe' by Ronny Sen | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it

"For millions, traveling inside unreserved general compartments in Indian trains is an inescapable Indian experience. A rapidly escalating inflation has resulted in severe hikes in fuel prices in India, compelling an increasing number of people to travel in unreserved general compartments of the Indian Railways."

 

Text and Photograph by Ronny Sen

Support the project on emphas.is

http://www.emphas.is/web/guest/discoverprojects?projectID=774#7
 

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'Never Forget' | A Travelling Exhibition on the Horrific Anti-Sikh Riots of 1984

'Never Forget' | A Travelling Exhibition on the Horrific Anti-Sikh Riots of 1984 | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it

" My pictures of that afternoon in 1984 were published in The Deccan Herald and The Herald Review, for which I was then working as a graphic designer. The Illustrated Weekly of India, too, published them in large spreads. Many were used in the PUCL/PUDR report on the Delhi killings, where all the photos were printed anonymously. This was because there was a fear that any witnesses, and photographers in particular, would be threatened, intimidated or attacked for publishing evidence. In fact, it is very hard to find images of the 1984 violence now. My negatives were safely processed by Mahatta’s and I made sure the multiple sets of prints they made went to different cities and into different newspaper archives.

 

This fear was a harbinger of what happened in Ayodhya in 1992, when at a signal, all photographers at the site were systematically attacked so they could capture no evidence of the Babri Masjid demolition and the people involved.

 

Seeing these images again, along with those by other photographers, outside the Bangla Saheb Gurdwara in Delhi, raises mixed emotions. While they constitute material evidence of the massacres, there has barely been any justice for the people who suffered."

 

Photographs and Text by Ram Rahman | Open Magazine

 

See also this article by Shailaja Tripathi on The Hindu

http://www.thehindu.com/arts/it-still-hurts/article4064713.ece?homepage=true

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Khoj Dus Tak : A Multi-Disciplinary Community-Based Arts Fest in Delhi

Khoj Dus Tak : A Multi-Disciplinary Community-Based Arts Fest in Delhi | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it

"It’s been a decade since the Khoj International Artists’ Association made the urban village of Khirkee Extension its home. This year is also important in Khoj’s calendar for the newly furbished building and exhibition space that they have finished constructing. To celebrate these two milestones, Khoj is now gearing up for a three day arts festival that they say has no precedence in the city’s art history. Scheduled from November 23-25, the festival, titled Khoj Dus Tak, will host 20 projects, six events and 27 artists and give the residents of Khirkee a chance to double up as artists, musicians, theatre artists, cooks and more.

(...)

Among the 20 projects, will be a “Photo Studio” created in one of the rooms of the newly renovated Khoj where the residents of Khirkee will be invited to get their photographs taken at minimum price so that they can create memories that mark their lives. “Shop Makeovers” will bring eight artists – Upasana Mehdiratta, Gaurvi Sharma, Vinima Gulati, Ram Bali Chauhan, Tulsi Ram, Amitabh Kumar, and Sanjib Roy – who will work in collaboration with five shopkeepers to exchange ideas and develop a collective method of art-making. The artists will help the shopkeepers to identify and translate ideas about how they can re-decorate their shops. “Khirkee Murals” is another project where Anpu Varke, a former resident of Khirkee and Nasheen, a current resident of Khirkee, will mark their stay and interaction with Khirkee by drawing murals relating to the changing face of Khirkee and ongoing urban expansion. For “Khirkee Raag”, Tarik, a band based in Delhi and Shillong, will collaborate with three musicians from Khirkee to create an original song about the place. Sounds from the local chai wallah, small production units and hawkers will compliment the musical content. For “Khirkee ka Khana & Recipe books” project, on each day of the festival, Khoj will invite five women of Khirkee to cook special food items of their own creation. The food will then be served to the general public while a recipe book will also be made available."

 

Article by Satarupa Paul | Artinfo

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Exhibition at Nature Morte, Delhi | JJ Valaya: “Decoded Paradox” and "the Soul in the Space"

Exhibition at Nature Morte, Delhi | JJ Valaya: “Decoded Paradox” and "the Soul in the Space" | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it

Nature Morte is pleased to present a series of photographs by the renowned fashion designer JJ Valaya. Mr. Valaya’s first foray into professional photography was with the exhibition “Decoded Paradox,” presented in Delhi in January 2011 and Mumbai in February 2011. The series presented personalities of New Delhi in costumes of Mr. Valaya’s design in a diverse array of locations, some historical, some contemporary. The resulting black-and-white photographs, highly accomplished in their technical aspects, articulated the peculiar combination of elements that typifies India today.

 

Mr. Valaya’s second series of photographic works is both more abstract and more personal. The focus of “The Soul in the Space” is on details of architecture shot in three locations that connect with his own biography: Jodhpur (the city of his birth), Chandigarh (the city where he was raised), and Dufftown, Scotland (where he first discovered architectural photography during an artist’s residency). With the precise eye of an accomplished designer, Mr. Valaya concentrates on mass, line and texture in both black-and-white and color works, composing starkly dynamic scenarios that approximate a painterly aesthetic but also unmoor the subjects from their original contexts. The prints on view will range from large-scale blow-ups that communicate a monumental grandeur to sets of smaller prints that are grouped together, creating syncopated rhythms. Mr. Valaya’s palette is purposefully reductive yet still highly sumptuous, relishing the chromatic nuances to be discovered in stone, metal and concrete.

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"Darkling I Listen" : Photography Freed from the Limitations of Sight

"Darkling I Listen" : Photography Freed from the Limitations of Sight | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it

"It struck me at once that this exhibition was almost free of visual clichés. None of the stock-in-trade of “Indian photography” — Cartier-Bresson’s decisive moments, Antoine D’Agata’s sexy shakes, Raghu Rai’s picturesque compositions — was to be seen in these photographs. We often respond to a photograph because it subliminally reminds us of another, more famous, photograph, painting or film-still. And, if we are not careful, this derivativeness, unthinking and automatic, determines the way we compose photographs, fantasies and memories. But the inner and outer lives of the blind are spared the inescapable clutter of readymade visual experience — or could it be that there are clichéd sounds, textures and smells that take their place? Somehow, it is difficult to think of clichés in spheres other than the verbal and the visual — which, in itself, is worth thinking about if we are worrying about the ubiquity of clichés.

 

The uncluttered quality of these photographs by the blind suggests a mode of vision that seems to have shed the burden of information and illustration. “This is my sight, detail-less,” says a wall-text by one of the partially sighted photographers in the show. So, as an experiment in a similar spirit, I decided to write this piece without providing any information about the gallery, photographers’ names, locations and even images from the show — not to mystify or tease by withholding facts, but to focus the reader’s attention on ideas and processes, instead of distracting him with names, places, dates and other specifications. I wondered, too, if ‘documentary’ photography could be freed, in certain cases, from the imperatives of context and information and taken towards a different order of vision, knowledge and value. And does this falling away of detail — not the details of texture or grain, but of information — make photography move closer to art?..."

 

Article by Aveek Sen | The Telegraph

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PIX : A Photographic Quarterly

PIX : A Photographic Quarterly | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it

Though a late bloomer in India, photography is today definitely a space stealer, a feted form of high art. With this rising arc, there also springs up the need for a parallel platform — that of photography magazines. In the Capital, we have one, Punctum, a bi-annual meant to showcase pan-Asian photography. And then, we have Pix, a quarterly “largely aimed at giving space to contemporary practices in Indian photographers.” Much has been written about Punctum, the work featured in it. But not so much about Pix, now six-volume old.

 

http://www.pixquarterly.in/

 

Article by Sangeet Barooah Pisharoty | The Hindu

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Aveek Sen on Raghu Rai : 'Capture Everthing'

Aveek Sen on Raghu Rai : 'Capture Everthing' | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it

"... Rai confesses to Geoffrey Ward, in the introduction to this book, that he wants to “capture everything”. This desire produces another compositional formula in Rai’s photography: the deliberately flattened human, animal and architectural panorama of the ghats seen from the river during the bathing hour. It gives to the eye—in a single movement from one end of a double-page photograph to the other—nothing less than everything that a “decisive moment” can hold. But such a ‘chaosmos’ of colourful simultaneity becomes a dil-maange-more version of Cartier-Bresson in Rai, whose double-spreads give you at least three decisive moments for the price of one within the conventional rectangle of documentary photography. In one black-and-white photograph, between a man squatting in a lungi on the left and another fingering his own prepuce in kurta-pajama on the right, we are given an amusing array of postures, gestures, expressions, clothes, hand movements and gazes to dwell on. And this horizontal inclusiveness is generously replicated in different settings—though bathing and burning are what human bodies are mostly seen doing in Varanasi..."

 

Photograph by Raghu Rai

Article by Aveek Sen |The Caravan

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Publication | 'Aperture and Identity', Early Photography in India

Publication | 'Aperture and Identity', Early Photography in India | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it

This exceptional 2009 magazine volume from Marg brings together a number of essays by new researchers. Much of the material and many writers are with the Alkazi Collection of Photography, which even supplied images for the beautiful ads. This is the first volume in a new thematic format by India's 60 year old Marg.

 

Particularly interesting are the two essays which cover albums, one by Lady Canning, the wife of an early Viceroy, and the other by the photographer Robert Gill. By Deepthi Sasidharan and Divia Patel respectively, they show how rich albums as scholarly topics can be. In an age when so many albums have been taken apart to sell single images, this is refreshing and very rewarding.

Another interesting essay, by Shuddhabrata Sengupta, contrasts the spectacular images of Kashmir with what is known, textually, about the miserable living conditions of the population.

Other important contributors include Rahaab Allana, Christopher Pinney, Pramod Kumar K.G. on the newly available photo-archive in Jaipur, and Sharada Dwivedi on Bombay panoramas. Neat things like re-photography of a Beato Lucknow panorama, and an interview with the owner of the prominent Mahatta Studio in Srinagar and Delhi make this a full featured contribution to Raj photography.

 

Edited by Rahaab Allana.

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Down memory lane with Mumbai’s acclaimed Hamilton Studios

Down memory lane with Mumbai’s acclaimed Hamilton Studios | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it

Mumbai’s Hamilton Studios, famous for its portraiture, turned 50 last month. Established in 1928 by Englishman Victor Sassoon, the studio is located in the heart of Ballard Estate, the city’s heritage district. Its 82-year-old owner and the only resident photographer (at one point there were 10) Ranjit Madhavji, a textile exporter who bought the studio on a whim, says that nothing much has changed in the last 50 years as far as its appearance is concerned. “I have not even got the walls repainted as I wanted to maintain the ambience of an old world studio. We have shot several celebrities within these walls,” he says. “From Madhubala to Zeenat Aman and JRD Tata, to Babasaheb Ambedkar and Wipro chairman Azim Premji, they have all come to get their portfolios clicked. I shoot only portfolio pictures and use at least 10 lights.” There have been times when he has taken one of his 20 unwieldy old cameras, which includes a Kodak 1926 Studio, a 1930 Field Camera, a Speedgraphic, a Graphlex, a Mamiaflex Professional, a Hilba and a Wilsor out of the studio to shoot people like the Dalai Lama. Deepali Nandwani gets him to blow the dust off some of the studio’s most memorable photographs...

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Archives | 'Past continuous'

Archives | 'Past continuous' | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it

"For a nation that constantly references and rewrites its past, we have a shocking lack of affinity towards its documentation. As Rahman points out, all our museums are a legacy of the British need to document their conquests; prior to which, in India, it was the ruling elite or the temples that were the repositories of art or artefacts. The Indian attitude towards preservation of records is best depicted by Dayanita Singh’s 2011 photographic series File Room in which bundles of folders are piled up in tottering shelves. Fading oral traditions, given priority over written ones, have ensured there are even fewer methods of preservation open to us."

 

Photograph : Habib Rahman/Courtesy Ram Rahman. Danseuse Indrani Rahman, late 1950s, the image is now part of the New York Public Library. 

 

Text by Gyatri Jayaraman | Livemint

 

 

 
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Interview | Shahidul Alam, "The Empty Frame"

Interview | Shahidul Alam, "The Empty Frame" | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it
In the world of photography, Shahidul Alam needs no introduction. He started as a photographer of children, and went on to make a substantial contribution to the medium and its practice not just in his country, Bangladesh, but in the Subcontinent. He set up a photography school, Pathshala, in conjunction with the World Press Photo educational initiative. And he was instrumental in starting Asia’s very first photo festival, Chobi Mela, which attracts the world’s top professionals. In this conversation, he tells Open why the Indian photography movement lags others’, and how Bangladeshi photographers have finally quit cloning his work.

Photograph and Interview by Ronny Sen | Open Magazine
khicṛī's insight:

Very Interesting article in which Shahidul Alam point out the importance of visual literacy, not only for photographers, but also for the professionals who surround them : " We do not have writers on photography at all, we don’t have good curators, we don’t have picture researchers, we don’t have good photo editors, we don’t have good agencies, agents for photographers. These all have to be in place for the medium and for the professional industry to be robust, sustainable and creatively vibrant."

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Mario Pires's curator insight, December 19, 2012 4:13 AM

In is introduction to the article he curated, khicṛī's talks about the importance of visual literacy in India, and that made me think about the situation in Portugal, where the problems are somehow similar to the ones described in the article.

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Glimpses of What to Expect at Chobi Mela 2013

Glimpses of What to Expect at Chobi Mela 2013 | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it
One of the most significant events in Asia, Chobi Mela is an international festival of photography and was launched in 2000. Held in Dhaka, Bangladesh, the purpose behind the inception of the festival was to showcase the works of Bangladeshi artists alongside the most exciting work from the rest of the world.

The festival was also to be a platform for debate and discussion. And now in its seventh edition, the festival has gone from strength to strength. It has symbolised a struggle against hegemony and oppression.

The theme for Chobi Mela VII is Fragility and it will present the creative works of world renowned as well as hitherto unknown photographers. To be held between 25 January–7 February 2013, the festival promises to be a wonderful melting pot of photographs and opinions. Of course, there is a lot more to look forward to.

Photograph by Protick Sarker ;
Text By Priyanka | Better Photography
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Interview | Eye of the beholder: Pushpamala N

Interview | Eye of the beholder: Pushpamala N | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it

"Pushpamala N (born in 1965) is a Bangalore based photography and video performance artist. Starting out as a sculptor with an interest in narrative figuration, Pushpamala N eventually took to casting her own body as various characters and personae in the medium of photo-performance. Interested in exploring photography as a medium of narrative fiction, she drew heavily from the history and traditions of cinema for her work. Recently she has also been using experimental short films, live performances and sculptural tableaux to explore the ideas that fascinate her. In this interview she talks about the synergy between movies and photographs, takes us into the fantastical and intriguing world of her art, discusses her work and traces its roots in cinema, explains her oeuvre that stands firmly in the middle-ground between film and photography and tells us that, in India, cinema and photography both created and recorded the country’s modernity."

 

Photograph by Pushpamal N | The Big Indian Picture

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A Photographer’s Account of Bal Thackeray’s Funeral

A Photographer’s Account of Bal Thackeray’s Funeral | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it

"The crowds were filing in now, small men casting long shadows that reminded me of Vincent Laforet’s aerial photographs of skaters in New York City. I shot some photos on my phone, instagrammed and tweeted those. In a few minutes they went viral. My caption for one picture was ‘This is Not Tahrir Square’, the sarcasm was missed but the photo was widely retweeted."

 

Photography and Text by Ritesh Uttamchandani | Open Magazine

More of his work on http://riteshuttamchandani.photoshelter.com

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Exhibition at Photoink Gallery | Kashmir by Amit Mehra

Exhibition at Photoink Gallery | Kashmir by Amit Mehra | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it

It’s a photograph of a hotel. Once a thriving, buzzing hotel in Gulmarg, now empty and silent. The picture is taken through a window. The next image is that of a boy with flutes in the foreground, also through a window. A tailor, also seen through a window, examines a needle and thread. Through a door, a window, or barbed wire—each picture has been captured from a distance; perhaps a distance as great as the Kashmiri reality is from the rest of the country.

 

Photograph by Amit Mehra

Article by Shreya Ray | LiveMint

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Photo Essay | 'Beanbags' by Zubin Pastakia

Photo Essay | 'Beanbags' by Zubin Pastakia | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it

"Mumbai can drive you crazy. And because (or, perhaps, despite) of this, you want to make sense of it. You want to make some kind of order out of it. And more often than not, in trying to create order, you succumb to the same thing that almost everyone succumbs to, the same trap: you fall for the idea of the “Maximum City”, the chaos, the speed, the heat, the shit, the poor, the rich, all at once, the grand narrative of 17 million people forced to live on top of one another in a city held together by ingenuity, momentum and sheer force of will. You succumb to this because it’s true, to a degree, and because it’s intoxicating, and also because it’s easy. In the overwhelming face of everything it’s easy to say, “all life is here, it’s messy, and it works!” and turn a blind eye to everything else. But it gets kind of boring. And it means that other interpretations are lost.

 

If you’ve lived or worked in Mumbai in the last five or ten years you’ll have seen the beanbag graffiti: Beanbags 26407383. I saw it once and then, like a new word you learn, I saw it everywhere, on walls, houses, pipelines, metal sheets, flyovers, construction sites, waste-ground. Everywhere: Beanbags 26407383. It was, it is, the work of a beanbag salesman, who had the genius to go out and spray the city with the name of his product and a phone number, at one stroke bypassing the legal, unaffordable marketing mechanisms of the ‘official’ city springing up around him. In the city of commerce, the very fabric of the city became an advertising hoarding. And this is how he made his fortune.

 

It’s a nice story, but we were interested in something else too. We were interested in the opportunity the repeated motif provided us to look at the city with different eyes, in a different light, away from the “Maximum” view...."

 

Text : Matthew Parker
Photograph  : Zubin Pastakia

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Public Space Arts Festival in Bangalore : Anti-Clocks, by Maara Collective

Public Space Arts Festival in Bangalore : Anti-Clocks, by Maara Collective | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it

"Anti-clocks is exactly what it sounds like: a rejection of ‘clock time’, of regimented sections of the day. The 12-day festival, which began on Sunday with a wall installation and painting, seeks to engage people through time-themed film, painting, poetry and music. It is organised by the city-based media and arts collective Maraa. Highlights include City As Darkroom, an exhibition of photographs shot in print cameras and developed in public venues (as opposed to rented darkrooms) and The Blackbox, a live sound project set up at Russell Market. The public is also invited to participate in activities such as poetry readings and postcard-making sessions – all related to one’s perceptions of time."

 

Article by Neha Mujumdar | The Hindu

 

-----
Maraa is a Media & Arts Collective. Visit their Website : http://maraa.in/ ;

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7 Days in Delhi : 7 films 7 artists 7 locations

7 Days in Delhi : 7 films 7 artists 7 locations | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it

In 7 days Third Ear’s Miriam Nielsen met 7 visual artists from the hyped and happening Indian art scene in Delhi.

The works of these artists comment on and interact with the city directly - which is why she asked them to take her to 7 locations in Delhi – to the places that inspire them.

 

Gigi Scaria places sculptures in transitional spaces in the city and photographs them. Sarnath Banerjee uses the hustlers that hang out in central Delhi as the characters in his graphic novels. B.L.O.T create stop motion animations out of the rich visual fabric of Old Delhi. Aastha Chauhan engages local people in a suburban part of the city in her radio programmes and community projects. Pushpamala N takes us to her “dress-wallah” where she buys costumes and backdrops for her shoots. Rohini Devashers videos and drawings are inspired by science and astronomy. She takes us to the Jantar Mantar an astronomical observatory from 1724 located in New Delhi. Vivan Sundaram creates works out of garbage, with the trash collectors who live at the periphery of the city.

Each of them open our eyes to this fast changing city, and its vibrant art scene.

 

Credits :
Directed and photographed by Miriam Nielsen, Sound by Tim Hinman, Edited by Michael Aaglund, Music by B.L.O.T and others.

 

http://thirdear.dk/7days/

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'To Conquer her Land' By Poulomi Basu

'To Conquer her Land' By Poulomi Basu | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it

Photographer Poulomi Basu said she got the idea after reading a newspaper article in 2009: India for the first time was recruiting women to serve in its Border Security Patrol, training them to police the country’s long and dangerous boundary with its archenemy, Pakistan.

“I thought this was something important that needed to be documented,” said Ms. Basu, who was born in India and divides her time now between London and Mumbai.

The merit of the project magnified in her mind as she realized all that her photos might show. Most of the recruits were from impoverished rural areas. If she could observe them not only in training but with their families as well, she would be able to tell the story of their transformation from villagers into soldiers.

“For these women, putting on a uniform was like coming out of their own skin,” Ms. Basu said. “They saw it as a way of gaining some form of independence...”

 

Photograph by Poulomi Basu

Article by Barry Bearak | LENS NYT

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Painted Photographs: Coloured Portraiture in India, from The Alkazi Collection of Photography

Painted Photographs: Coloured Portraiture in India, from The Alkazi Collection of Photography | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it

As the venerable Ebrahim Alkazi himself says in the Foreword: “Indian Photographic studios developed their own karkhanas (artists’ ateliers and workshops) much in the manner of the traditional Mughal and regional schools of painting. They adopted particular styles and devised distinctive provincial traits and palettes. Some catered to royal patrons whose custom set them distinctly apart; others found a steady lucrative business in serving the needs of the burgeoning and prosperous mercantile and professional classes. With its fantastic painted backdrops of verdant landscapes, royal gardens, rearing stallions, tempestuous oceans and secret boudoirs, this unique mode of photography passed into the accepted aesthetic traditions of Indian life and has survived as one of its most delightful rituals.”

 

Photo courtesy: The Alkazi Collection

Article by Ranvir Shah | The Hindu

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Rare Book Society of India | Indian theatrical group, Bombay (1870)

Rare Book Society of India | Indian theatrical group, Bombay (1870) | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it

Photograph of a Theatrical Group in Bombay (now Mumbai) from the Lee-Warner Collection: 'Bombay Presidency' by an unknown photographer in the 1870s. This was a studio portrait of a Marathi theatrical troupe, in costume, posed in front of a backdrop of a European interior. Marathi theatre has a long tradition of performance, incorporating songs and dances, and in the 18th century a popular form of folk theatre developed called Tamasha, with snatches of dance and acrobatic movements. Modern Marathi theatre originated in the mid-19th century.

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