Indian Photographies
14.5K views | +1 today
Follow
Indian Photographies
Visual Culture in the Subcontinent
Curated by khicṛī
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by khicṛī
Scoop.it!

Exhibition in Delhi | 'The Calcutta Diaries' by Pablo Bartholomew

Exhibition in Delhi | 'The Calcutta Diaries' by Pablo Bartholomew | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it
“I have photographed what was around me and still do. Journeys were made then and they continue even now. So, I have always recorded what was around me and intrigued me. The engagement was very simple—to look, to see, and to capture; to fill some voids that were created in the past and remain even now. In some ways it has been a form of therapy and sometimes a shield. And in our family, we lived our lives and recorded them, and if now some of it has become ‘history’ then so be it. We all make up our own language as we go along. The archive is a reservoir of this language, and it needs to undergo a constant process of re-engagement and re-assessment, in the same way that language changes and evolves over time. This is what archives are for me. They are the guardians of our memories. Calcutta is still a city that is held by time. I felt it more when I went to visit my grandmother as a child, and it still held that resonance when I went on to the sets of Shatranj Ke Khiladi . So, when I was photographing it, it was not about nostalgia as it may seem like now. Perhaps, with the passage of some more time it may become history. It is all about transitions and time—story becomes myth, myth becomes legend.”


Photograph and words by Pablo Bartholomew

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by khicṛī
Scoop.it!

Publication | 'Aperture and Identity', Early Photography in India

Publication | 'Aperture and Identity', Early Photography in India | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it

This exceptional 2009 magazine volume from Marg brings together a number of essays by new researchers. Much of the material and many writers are with the Alkazi Collection of Photography, which even supplied images for the beautiful ads. This is the first volume in a new thematic format by India's 60 year old Marg.

 

Particularly interesting are the two essays which cover albums, one by Lady Canning, the wife of an early Viceroy, and the other by the photographer Robert Gill. By Deepthi Sasidharan and Divia Patel respectively, they show how rich albums as scholarly topics can be. In an age when so many albums have been taken apart to sell single images, this is refreshing and very rewarding.

Another interesting essay, by Shuddhabrata Sengupta, contrasts the spectacular images of Kashmir with what is known, textually, about the miserable living conditions of the population.

Other important contributors include Rahaab Allana, Christopher Pinney, Pramod Kumar K.G. on the newly available photo-archive in Jaipur, and Sharada Dwivedi on Bombay panoramas. Neat things like re-photography of a Beato Lucknow panorama, and an interview with the owner of the prominent Mahatta Studio in Srinagar and Delhi make this a full featured contribution to Raj photography.

 

Edited by Rahaab Allana.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by khicṛī
Scoop.it!

‘Desires Wrought upon the Surface of an Image’: Photography as an Art in India | An Article by Rahaab Allana

‘Desires Wrought upon the Surface of an Image’: Photography as an Art in India  | An Article by Rahaab Allana | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it

"Photographers as ‘Artists’ appeared at a distinct moment in the history of photography in India; these ‘artist-photographers’ based their work on the aesthetics of exchange between tradition, fine art and even performance. This allows for a more complex and unrestrained view of the discipline, one in which the camera develops close links with painting and printmaking. Furthermore, these photographers sought to publicize their spaces as art ateliers, equipped with statues, furniture and painted backdrops, further emphasized by the versos of card-mounted photographs..."

 

Photograph : C.A Dannenberg
HH Maharaja Jaswant Singh of Bharatpur,
(Handnote on back) "Rajah of Bhurtpore,
photographed & painted by JCA Dannenberg 1863,
Sent to the Viceroy from the Rajah",
hand painted-albumen print,
dated 1863, 144 x 110 mm.
Courtesy The Alkazi Collection of Photography

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by khicṛī
Scoop.it!

Exhibition in London | Raqs Media Collective : An Afternoon Unregistered on the Richter Scale (2011)

Exhibition in London | Raqs Media Collective : An Afternoon Unregistered on the Richter Scale (2011) | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it

"Raqs Media Collective are three Delhi-based artists - Jeebesh Bagchi, Monica Narula and Shuddhabrata Sengupta - whose practices include photography, new media, film, media theory and research, criticism and curation.

An Afternoon Unregistered on the Richter Scale (2011) is a silent looped video projection of an archival photograph, subtly altered by the artists to create a dream-like mise-en-scène. The original photograph, taken by James Waterhouse, depicts a room full of surveyors in colonial Calcutta in 1911, and is titled Examining Room of the Duffing Section of the Photographic Department of the Survey of India.

The Collective hope this intervention can ‘conjure a constellation of stars onto a drawing board, induce tremors too gentle to disturb the Richter scale, reveal a dreamed up desert, make time wind backwards, stain the afternoon with indigo and introduce a rustle and a hesitation in the determined stillness of the surveyors hard at work at mapping empire’."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by khicṛī
Scoop.it!

Exhibition in Delhi | 'Dawn Upon Delhi: Rise of a Capital' at NGMA

Exhibition in Delhi | 'Dawn Upon Delhi: Rise of a Capital' at NGMA | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it

An exhibition titled 'Dawn Upon Delhi: Rise of a Capital' is set to bring to life the glittering but chequered past of the city.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by khicṛī
Scoop.it!

Who has Photographs? by Janaki Abraham

Who has Photographs? by Janaki Abraham | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it

The Thiyyas, a matrilineal community from North Kerala whose members are spread all over the India and the world, tend to document family history through photographs, letters, family trees, genealogies and myths of creation. Sociologist Janaki Abraham has been researching the visual cultures of the Thiyyas for the last five years. In the following essay she presents photographs found in home in Thalassery, Kerala, and challenges the assumption that the privileged alone had collections of old photographs.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by khicṛī
Scoop.it!

Painted Photographs: Coloured Portraiture in India, from The Alkazi Collection of Photography

Painted Photographs: Coloured Portraiture in India, from The Alkazi Collection of Photography | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it

As the venerable Ebrahim Alkazi himself says in the Foreword: “Indian Photographic studios developed their own karkhanas (artists’ ateliers and workshops) much in the manner of the traditional Mughal and regional schools of painting. They adopted particular styles and devised distinctive provincial traits and palettes. Some catered to royal patrons whose custom set them distinctly apart; others found a steady lucrative business in serving the needs of the burgeoning and prosperous mercantile and professional classes. With its fantastic painted backdrops of verdant landscapes, royal gardens, rearing stallions, tempestuous oceans and secret boudoirs, this unique mode of photography passed into the accepted aesthetic traditions of Indian life and has survived as one of its most delightful rituals.”

 

Photo courtesy: The Alkazi Collection

Article by Ranvir Shah | The Hindu

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by khicṛī
Scoop.it!

Rare Book Society of India | Indian theatrical group, Bombay (1870)

Rare Book Society of India | Indian theatrical group, Bombay (1870) | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it

Photograph of a Theatrical Group in Bombay (now Mumbai) from the Lee-Warner Collection: 'Bombay Presidency' by an unknown photographer in the 1870s. This was a studio portrait of a Marathi theatrical troupe, in costume, posed in front of a backdrop of a European interior. Marathi theatre has a long tradition of performance, incorporating songs and dances, and in the 18th century a popular form of folk theatre developed called Tamasha, with snatches of dance and acrobatic movements. Modern Marathi theatre originated in the mid-19th century.

Copyright © The British Library Board | Via RBSI

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by khicṛī
Scoop.it!

Vintage India via Cecil Beaton

Vintage India via Cecil Beaton | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it

"In 1945, in one of its more inspired moments, the British Ministry of Information dispatched Cecil Beaton; chosen photographer to royalty, darling photographer to the likes of Audrey Hepburn and Greta Garbo and later the world-famous designer of My Fair Lady and Gigi, to the Far East to take pictures of the British Empire and its allies at war. The result was not only a superb collection of photographs but a breathtakingly vivid written portrait of India, Burma, and China at a historic turning-point in their histories.

Beaton was a great observer and, perhaps unexpectedly, a great describer. In remarkably few words, he can make you see, hear, smell, almost touch the dusty Indian countryside, the shimmering, casual magnificence of a Bombay virtually untouched by war..."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by khicṛī
Scoop.it!

Old and Vintage Photographs of India

Old and Vintage Photographs of India | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it

http://121clicks.com/inspirations/old-and-vintage-photographs-of-beautiful-india

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by khicṛī
Scoop.it!

Wearing her ghoonghat a few inches higher | ShahidulNews

Wearing her ghoonghat a few inches higher | ShahidulNews | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it

"This image was photographed in Delhi, shortly after my Paternal grandparents Chameli and Phool Chand, got married. She was 14 and he was 16. It was unusual for couples in our family to be photographed, especially holding hands, which turned out to be an indication of the unconventional direction their lives would take. They were both Gandhians and Freedom fighters..."

more...
No comment yet.