Hepatitis C New Drugs Review
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hepatitis C viral nonstructural protein 5A stabilizes growth-regulatory human transcripts | Nucleic Acids Research | Oxford Academic

hepatitis C viral nonstructural protein 5A stabilizes growth-regulatory human transcripts | Nucleic Acids Research | Oxford Academic | Hepatitis C New Drugs Review | Scoop.it
Abstract. Numerous mammalian proto-oncogene and other growth-regulatory transcripts are upregulated in malignancy due to abnormal mRNA stabilization. In hepato
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Hepatitis C New Drugs Review
FDA approved Incivek(telaprevir, Vertex) on Monday 23 May by its PDUFA deadline.A paradigm shift in the treatment of Hepatitis C virus infection. <a href="http://knol.google.com/k/krishan-maggon/boceprevir-merck-telaprevir-vertex/3fy5eowy8suq3/151#"; rel="nofollow">http://knol.google.com/k/krishan-maggon/boceprevir-merck-telaprevir-vertex/3fy5eowy8suq3/151#</a>;
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Created public version #121 of the knol: "Boceprevir (Merck) & Telaprevir (Vertex) Hepatitis C : FDA Review & Approval"

Created public version #121 of the knol: "Boceprevir (Merck) & Telaprevir (Vertex) Hepatitis C : FDA Review & Approval" | Hepatitis C New Drugs Review | Scoop.it
Krishan Maggon published version 121 of a knol titled: "Boceprevir (Merck) & Telaprevir (Vertex) Hepatitis C : FDA Review & Approval"...
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An effective rodent Hepatitis C model

An effective rodent Hepatitis C model | Hepatitis C New Drugs Review | Scoop.it
Hepatitis C virus is a leading cause of liver disease worldwide, yet little is understood about Hepatitis C virus (HCV) in vivo because HCV only infects humans and chimpanzees, and thus capacity for experimentation is limited.
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Safety, tolerability, and pharmacokinetics of AL-335 in healthy volunteers and hepatitis C virus-infected subjects

Safety, tolerability, and pharmacokinetics of AL-335 in healthy volunteers and hepatitis C virus-infected subjects | Hepatitis C New Drugs Review | Scoop.it
Abstract
Background
The nucleotide analog AL-335 is a pangenotypic hepatitis C virus (HCV) nonstructural protein (NS)5B inhibitor being evaluated as treatment for chronic HCV infection.

Methods
This three-part randomized, double-blind study evaluated the safety and pharmacokinetics of single and multiple ascending oral doses of AL-335. Healthy volunteers (HVs) received single doses of AL-335 (100–1,200 mg) or placebo in a fasted or fed (400 mg) state. Non-cirrhotic subjects (HCV genotype [GT]1−4) and GT1-infected subjects with Child Pugh A cirrhosis received multiple doses of AL-335 (400, 800, 1,200 mg) or placebo once daily (QD) for 7 days.

Results
Forty-eight HVs and 64 subjects with HCV GT1−4 were randomized and received treatment. AL-335 was well tolerated in HVs and HCV-infected subjects with/without cirrhosis. AL-335 was rapidly absorbed and converted to the metabolites ALS-022399 and ALS-022227. ALS-022227 exposure increased less than dose-proportionally and was unaffected by food, while AL-335 and ALS-022399 exposure increased with food by 85% and 50%, respectively, in HVs. Rapid and dose-dependent reductions in HCV-RNA were observed in GT1-infected subjects. In non-cirrhotic, GT1−4-infected subjects receiving AL-335 800 mg QD, potent antiviral activity was observed, regardless of genotype (mean maximum reductions in HCV-RNA of 4.0−4.8 log10 IU/mL). The same dose in GT1-infected cirrhotic subjects resulted in a 3.5 log10 IU/mL mean maximum reduction in HCV-RNA.

Conclusions
AL-335 was well tolerated when administered as single and multiple doses, with an acceptable pharmacokinetic profile. The drug also demonstrated potent antiviral activity in HCV GT1–4-infected subjects, including GT1-infected subjects with cirrhosis.
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RCSB PDB - 4WXP: X-ray crystal structure of NS3 Helicase from HCV with a bound fragment inhibitor at 2.08 A resolution

RCSB PDB - 4WXP: X-ray crystal structure of NS3 Helicase from HCV with a bound fragment inhibitor at 2.08 A resolution | Hepatitis C New Drugs Review | Scoop.it
4WXP: X-ray crystal structure of NS3 Helicase from HCV with a bound fragment inhibitor at 2.08 A resolution...
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Biomolecules | Hepatitis C Virus-Infected Apoptotic Hepatocytes Program Macrophages and Hepatic Stellate Cells for Liver Inflammation and Fibrosis Development: Role of Ethanol as a...

Biomolecules | Hepatitis C Virus-Infected Apoptotic Hepatocytes Program Macrophages and Hepatic Stellate Cells for Liver Inflammation and Fibrosis Development: Role of Ethanol as a... | Hepatitis C New Drugs Review | Scoop.it
Hepatocyte apoptosis is a crucially important mechanism for liver disease pathogenesis, and the engulfment of apoptotic bodies (AB) by non-parenchymal cells serves as a leading mechanism of inflammation and fibrosis progression.
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Neuralized E3 Ubiquitin Protein Ligase 3 Is an Inducible Antiviral Effector That Inhibits Hepatitis C Virus Assembly by Targeting Viral E1 Glycoprotein

Neuralized E3 Ubiquitin Protein Ligase 3 Is an Inducible Antiviral Effector That Inhibits Hepatitis C Virus Assembly by Targeting Viral E1 Glycoprotein | Hepatitis C New Drugs Review | Scoop.it
Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a major cause of chronic hepatitis, liver cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. HCV can be sensed by host innate immunity to induce expression of interferons (IFNs) and a number of antiviral effectors.
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Hepatitis C virus cell culture models: an encomium on basic research paving the road to therapy development

Hepatitis C virus cell culture models: an encomium on basic research paving the road to therapy development | Hepatitis C New Drugs Review | Scoop.it
Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infections affect 71 million people worldwide, often resulting in severe liver damage. Since 2014 highly efficient therapies based on directly acting antivirals (DAAs) are available, offering cure rates of almost 100%, if the infection is diagnosed in time. It took more than a decade to discover HCV in 1989 and another decade to establish a cell culture model. This review provides a personal view on the importance of HCV cell culture models, particularly the replicon system, in the process of therapy development, from drug screening to understanding of mode of action and resistance, with a special emphasis on the contributions of Ralf Bartenschlager’s group. It summarizes the tremendous efforts of scientists in academia and industry required to achieve efficient DAAs, focusing on the main targets, protease, polymerase and NS5A. It furthermore underpins the importance of strong basic research laying the ground for translational medicine.

Keywords
Hepatitis C virus HCV Hepatocyte DAA Therapy Antiviral Cell culture Replicon Genotype Bartenschlager Adaptation 
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Microbial translocation and T cell activation are modified by direct‐acting antiviral therapy in HCV‐infected patients - Lattanzi - - Alimentary Pharmacology & Therapeutics - Wiley Online Library

Microbial translocation and T cell activation are modified by direct‐acting antiviral therapy in HCV‐infected patients - Lattanzi - - Alimentary Pharmacology & Therapeutics - Wiley Online Library | Hepatitis C New Drugs Review | Scoop.it

Background

Microbial translocation from the gut lumen has been involved in the pathogenesis of liver damage in hepatitis C virus infection.

Aim

To investigate the impact of direct‐acting antiviral treatment on microbial translocation and T‐cell activation, in patients with hepatitis C‐related liver disease.

Methods

We enrolled two groups of HCV patients undergoing direct‐acting antiviral treatment: patients with fibrosis ≥F3 according to Metavir (Group ≥F3); patients with hepatitis C recurrence after liver transplantation and Metavir ≥F2 (Group Liver Transplantation + ≥F2). All patients were treated with direct‐acting antivirals based on ongoing guidelines. Surrogate biomarkers of microbial translocation (plasma concentrations of soluble‐CD14, lipopolysaccharide binding protein and intestinal fatty acid‐binding protein) were evaluated at baseline, at first month, at the end of treatment and 3 months later. T‐cell activation was measured by expression of CD38+ HLA‐DR at the same time points, only in Group ≥F3.

Results

There were 32 patients in Group ≥F3 and 13 in Group LT + ≥F2. At baseline, levels of soluble‐CD14 and lipopolysaccharide binding protein were significantly higher in both groups vs healthy controls. Baseline soluble‐CD14 correlated with glutamic‐oxalacetic transaminase (r = 0.384, P = 0.009) and glutamic‐pyruvic transaminase (r = 0.293, P = 0.05). A significant decrease in plasma levels of surrogate microbial translocation biomarkers was observed during and after treatment in the two groups although values were not normalised. In Group ≥F3, CD38+ HLADR+ T‐cell expression was significantly decreased by direct‐acting antiviral treatment. Relapsers (9%) showed higher soluble‐CD14 levels at baseline.

Conclusion

Surrogate microbial translocation markers and T cell activation are increased in hepatitis C patients with liver fibrosis and decrease during direct‐acting antiviral treatment.

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Molecular Mechanism of Resistance in a Clinically Significant Double-Mutant Variant of HCV NS3/4A Protease

Molecular Mechanism of Resistance in a Clinically Significant Double-Mutant Variant of HCV NS3/4A Protease | Hepatitis C New Drugs Review | Scoop.it
The molecular mechanism of resistance for HCV NS3/4A protease inhibitors (PIs) against
the clinically emerging Y56H/D168A variant is described by determining crystal structures
of this double mutant and Y56H variant. Substitution at the neighboring Y56 disrupted
critical stacking interactions with the catalytic His57, revealing a structural mechanism
that threatens cross-resistance.
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Exosomes from Hepatitis C Infected Patients Transmit HCV Infection and Contain Replication Competent Viral RNA in Complex with Ago2-miR122-HSP90

Exosomes from Hepatitis C Infected Patients Transmit HCV Infection and Contain Replication Competent Viral RNA in Complex with Ago2-miR122-HSP90 | Hepatitis C New Drugs Review | Scoop.it
Author Summary Since its first isolation and identification in 1989, Hepatitis C virus (HCV), has caused significant disease burden to humans worldwide. So far, there is no vaccine against HCV, and neutralizing antibody therapies to block receptor–mediated transmission of HCV to liver cells have...
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Current therapy for chronic hepatitis C: The role of direct-acting antivirals - ScienceDirect

Current therapy for chronic hepatitis C: The role of direct-acting antivirals - ScienceDirect | Hepatitis C New Drugs Review | Scoop.it
Highlights

HCV genotype-specific drugs evolve to pan-genotypic drugs.


Drug potency increases from moderate (∼60%) to high (>90%) levels of sustained virologic response.


Treatment durations are shortened from a 48-week to 12-week or 8-week period.


HCV therapies based upon multiple pills per day are simplified to a single pill per day.


HCV therapies are administered orally regardless of prior treatment history and cirrhotic status.
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Restoration of natural killer cell activity by interferon‐free direct‐acting antiviral combination therapy in chronic hepatitis C patients - Nakamura - 2018 - Hepatology Research - Wiley Online Lib...

Aim Interferon‐free direct‐acting antiviral (DAA) therapy is an effective treatment for chronic hepatitis C (CH(C)) patients. Activity of natural killer (NK) cells was reported to be impaired in patients with hepatitis C virus infection. The aim of this study was to examine whether DAA therapy could restore NK activity in patients with CH(C). Methods Direct‐acting antiviral therapy was given to 31 CH(C) patients as asunaprevir/daclatasvir (ASV/DCV) (n = 15), ledipasvir/sofosbuvir (n = 7), ombitasvir/paritaprevir/ritonavir (n = 6), or elbasvir/grazoprevir (n = 3). Prior to therapy (0M), at the completion of the therapy (EOT), and at 24 weeks after completion (AFTER), NK activity and the frequency of CD56dimNK and CD56brightNK cells in peripheral blood were estimated by Cr release assay and flow cytometry. Statistical analysis was carried out by anova and the Mann–Whitney U‐test. Results In one of the ASV/DCV‐treated patients, treatment was stopped 12 weeks after initiation of therapy because of viral breakthrough. The anova showed that NK activity significantly improved at EOT (vs. 0M, P < 0.01) and at AFTER (vs. 0M, P < 0.001) in 30 patients with sustained virologic response. It also showed that the frequency of CD56dimNK cells was significantly increased at EOT and at AFTER (vs. 0M, P < 0.05). In addition, the NK activity ratio (AFTER/0M) had no significant difference between patient groups with higher and lower Fibrosis‐4 scores. Conclusion Direct‐acting antiviral therapy in CH(C) patients could improve NK activity by increasing the frequency of CD56dimNK cells. Additionally, our results might imply that DAAs therapy could reduce the risk of hepatocarcinogenesis by restoring innate immune responses.
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The effects of direct‐acting antiviral agents on the frequency of myeloid‐derived suppressor cells and natural killer cells in patients with chronic hepatitis C - Li - - Journal of Medical Virology...

The effects of direct‐acting antiviral agents on the frequency of myeloid‐derived suppressor cells and natural killer cells in patients with chronic hepatitis C - Li - - Journal of Medical Virology... | Hepatitis C New Drugs Review | Scoop.it
Currently, hepatitis C antiviral therapy is entering a new era with the use of direct‐acting antiviral (DAA) agents. However, the precise immunological influences of DAA therapy in patients with chronic hepatitis C (CHC) are insufficiently understood. This study aimed to investigate the effects of DAA therapy on the frequency of myeloid‐derived suppressor cells (MDSCs), T lymphocytes, and natural killer (NK) cells in patients with CHC. Thirty‐two treatment‐naive CHC patients were treated with DAA therapy, and the frequency of immune cells was analyzed by flow cytometry at various time points during and after therapy. Sixteen healthy donors were recruited for comparison. DAA therapy decreased the frequency of MDSCs and monocytic MDSCs in patients with CHC to a normal level. DAA therapy also increased the CD8+ T and NK cell levels in patients with CHC. In addition, activation (NKp30 and NKp46) and inhibitory (NKG2A) receptors on NK cells were downregulated to yield an NK cell phenotype resembling that observed in the healthy controls. This study provides insight into the normalization of immune cell levels under DAA therapy and indicates that restoration of the immune system in patients with CHC strongly supports long‐term curative hepatitis C virus eradication.
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Acute Kidney Injury in Patients Undergoing Chronic Hepatitis C Virus Treatment With Ledipasvir/Sofosbuvir - Brown - 2018 - Hepatology Communications - Wiley Online Library

Abstract
Ledipasvir‐sofosbuvir, a once‐a‐day, oral combination pill, was approved in 2014 for the treatment of chronic hepatitis C infection. Initial trials did not comment on nephrotoxicity; however, recent data suggest a risk of acute kidney injury (AKI) with the use of the medication. We assessed the rates of AKI in patients undergoing ledipasvir‐sofosbuvir in a large, urban tertiary care center. This single‐center retrospective observation study included all patients undergoing therapy from October 1, 2014, to October 1, 2015. Rates of AKI, defined by more than a 0.3 mg/dL increase in serum creatinine level, were calculated. Patients were followed 12 weeks after therapy to assess for sustained viral response as well as to assess for improvement of AKI after completion of therapy, defined by less than 0.2 mg/dL above baseline serum creatinine. In total, 197 patients were included in the final analysis who had completed ledipasvir‐sofosbuvir therapy and completed laboratory values. Among the patients treated, 38 (19%) had AKI during therapy. An additional 4 (2%) had AKI at the end of therapy. Of the 38 patients who experienced AKI, 20 (53%) had improvement in serum creatinine to less than 0.2 mg/dL above their baseline. When comparing for chronic kidney disease (CKD) stage, those with CKD I or II experienced AKI 17% of the time compared with 47% of the time in CKD III or worse (P = 0.005). Conclusion: AKI was seen in nearly one‐fifth of our patients, and patients with CKD stage III or worse are at increased risk. Although ledipasvir‐sofosbuvir is generally safe in the general population, close monitoring of renal function is recommended.
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Role of the Conserved DECH-Box Cysteine in Coupling Hepatitis C Virus Helicase-Catalyzed ATP Hydrolysis to RNA Unwinding - Biochemistry (ACS Publications)

Role of the Conserved DECH-Box Cysteine in Coupling Hepatitis C Virus Helicase-Catalyzed ATP Hydrolysis to RNA Unwinding - Biochemistry (ACS Publications) | Hepatitis C New Drugs Review | Scoop.it
DECH-box proteins are a subset of DExH/D-box superfamily 2 helicases possessing a conserved Asp-Glu-Cys-His motif in their ATP binding site. The conserved His helps position the Asp and Glu residues, which coordinate the divalent metal cation that connects the protein to ATP and activate the water molecule needed for ATP hydrolysis, but the role of the Cys is still unclear. This study uses site-directed mutants of the model DECH-box helicase encoded by the hepatitis C virus (HCV) to examine the role of the Cys in helicase action. Proteins lacking a Cys unwound DNA less efficiently than wild-type proteins did. For example, at low protein concentrations, a helicase harboring a Gly instead of the DECH-box Cys unwound DNA more slowly than the wild-type helicase did, but at higher protein concentrations, the two proteins unwound DNA at similar rates. All HCV proteins analyzed had similar affinities for ATP and nucleic acids and hydrolyzed ATP in the presence of RNA at similar rates. However, in the absence of RNA, all proteins lacking a DECH-box cysteine hydrolyzed ATP 10–15 times faster with higher Km values, and lower apparent affinities for metal ions, compared to those observed with wild-type proteins. These differences were observed with proteins isolated from HCV genotypes 2a and 1b, suggesting that this role is conserved. These data suggest the helicase needs Cys292 to bind ATP in a state where ATP is not hydrolyzed until RNA binds.
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Point-of-Care Screening for a Current Hepatitis C Virus Infection: Influence on Uptake of a Concomitant Offer of HIV Screening

Point-of-Care Screening for a Current Hepatitis C Virus Infection: Influence on Uptake of a Concomitant Offer of HIV Screening | Hepatitis C New Drugs Review | Scoop.it
Eliminating hepatitis C as a public health threat requires an improved understanding of how to increase testing uptake. We piloted point-of-care testing (POCT) for a current HCV infection in an inner-city Emergency Department (ED) and assessed the influence on uptake of offering concomitant screening for HIV. Over four months, all adults attending ED with minor injuries were first invited to complete an anonymous questionnaire then invited to test in alternating cycles offering HCV POCT or HCV+HIV POCT. Viral RNA was detected in finger-prick blood by GeneXpert. 814/859 (94.8%) questionnaires were returned and 324/814 (39.8%) tests were accepted, comprising 211 HCV tests and 113 HCV+HIV tests. Offering concomitant HIV screening reduced uptake after adjusting for age and previous HCV testing (odds ratio 0.51; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.38–0.68; p < 0.001). HCV prevalence was 1/324 (0.31%; 95% CI 0.05–1.73); no participant tested positive for HIV. 167/297 (56.2%) POCT participants lived in the most deprived neighbourhoods in England. HCV RNA testing using finger-prick blood was technically feasible. Uptake was moderate and the offer of concomitant HIV screening showed a detrimental impact on acceptability in this low prevalence population. The findings should be confirmed in a variety of other community settings.
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Significant impact of new oral therapies against HCV on the waiting list for liver transplantation in Spain

Significant impact of new oral therapies against HCV on the waiting list for liver transplantation in Spain | Hepatitis C New Drugs Review | Scoop.it
In patients with chronic hepatitis C, sustained viral response has been shown to result in histological and clinical improvement.1 With the advent of the new interferon (IFN)-free regimens, highly effective and safe even in patients historically considered “difficult to treat and cure”, additional...
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Impact of direct-acting antivirals on early recurrence of HCV-related HCC: comparison with interferon-based therapy

Impact of direct-acting antivirals on early recurrence of HCV-related HCC: comparison with interferon-based therapy | Hepatitis C New Drugs Review | Scoop.it
Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most common cancers worldwide and a leading
cause of cancer-related death [1]. HCC usually develops in patients with chronic liver
diseases, often related to hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection [2 3].
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DAAs for HCV and risk of hepatocellular carcinoma: current standpoint

DAAs for HCV and risk of hepatocellular carcinoma: current standpoint | Hepatitis C New Drugs Review | Scoop.it
The advent of effective and safe direct-acting antiviral agents (DAAs) for hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, which are able to eradicate the virus even when patients have progressed to advanced cirrhosis, has raised hope not only that the risk of hepatic decompensation could be reduced, but also that the occurrence of new liver tumours could be prevented. However, in 2016, two articles 1 ,  2 reported that around 28% of patients treated with DAAs had hepatocellular carcinoma recurrence within a few months of achieving a sustained virological response (SVR), which was higher than expected. Additionally, one of the studies 2 reported an incidence of de-novo hepatocellular carcinoma of 3·1% at 1 year after achieving an SVR with DAAs, which was no lower than the previously reported incidence in patients with HCV infection that had progressed to cirrhosis. After 2 years of further research, some conclusions can be drawn about the effects of DAAs on the occurrence of hepatocellular carcinoma, but areas of uncertainty still exist.
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Pathways to ensure universal and affordable access to hepatitis C treatment | BMC Medicine | Full Text

Pathways to ensure universal and affordable access to hepatitis C treatment | BMC Medicine | Full Text | Hepatitis C New Drugs Review | Scoop.it
Direct-acting antivirals (DAAs) have dramatically changed the landscape of hepatitis C treatment and prevention. The World Health Organization has called for the elimination of hepatitis C as a public health threat by 2030.
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What is required from HCV point-of-care tests to reduce the burden of hepatitis C infection? ‘Development and clinical validation of the genedrive point-of-care test for qualitative detection of he...

What is required from HCV point-of-care tests to reduce the burden of hepatitis C infection? ‘Development and clinical validation of the genedrive point-of-care test for qualitative detection of he... | Hepatitis C New Drugs Review | Scoop.it
The major advances in hepatitis C virus (HCV) diagnosis and treatment now make hepatitis C infection a curable disease over a short period of time and thus, theoretically, an eliminable disease. In its viral hepatitis elimination plan, the WHO aims, by 2030, to scale-up HCV treatment coverage to...
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Review article: novel antivirals for hepatitis C—sofosbuvir/velpatasvir/voxilaprevir, glecaprevir/pibrentasvir - Pearlman - - Alimentary Pharmacology & Therapeutics - Wiley Online Library

Review article: novel antivirals for hepatitis C—sofosbuvir/velpatasvir/voxilaprevir, glecaprevir/pibrentasvir - Pearlman - - Alimentary Pharmacology & Therapeutics - Wiley Online Library | Hepatitis C New Drugs Review | Scoop.it
Summary
Background
In 2017, the hepatitis C treatment regimens sofosbuvir/velpatasvir/voxilaprevir (SOF/VEL/VOX) and glecaprevir/pibrentasvir (G/P) received approval from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Although both SOF/VEL/VOX (NS5B polymerase inhibitor/NS5A inhibitor/NS3/4A protease inhibitor) and G/P (NS3/4A protease inhibitor/NS5A inhibitor) are pangenotypic regimens, they are indicated for distinct subsets of patients with hepatitis C.

Aim
To compare and contrast available safety and efficacy data for SOF/VEL/VOX and G/P and outline their clinical utility.

Methods
For each of the regimens, this review outlines the indications, safety information, and the major clinical studies in which SOF/VEL/VOX and G/P were evaluated.

Results
SOF/VEL/VOX is positioned as a salvage regimen for patients previously treated with NS5A inhibitors and for genotype 1a‐ and 3‐infected patients who had failed other sofosbuvir‐containing regimens. G/P is the first pangenotypic regimen with an 8‐week duration for treatment‐naïve, non‐cirrhotic patients, and it is indicated for patients with any genotype who have advanced kidney disease, including those on dialysis.

Conclusion
The addition of SOF/VEL/VOX and G/P to existing hepatitis C treatment options will expand the number of patients who are eligible for and responsive to treatment, thus increasing the possibility of eliminating hepatitis C as a public health issue.
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One hepatocyte, two malignant fates

One hepatocyte, two malignant fates | Hepatitis C New Drugs Review | Scoop.it
Hepatic microenvironment dictates lineage commitment of hepatocytes, which can form two completely distinct tumor types.
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HBV reactivation after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and rituximab-containing chemotherapy: a 12-year experience at a single center

HBV reactivation after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and rituximab-containing chemotherapy: a 12-year experience at a single center | Hepatitis C New Drugs Review | Scoop.it
Correspondence...
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IDWeek: Opioid-using youth could miss out on hepatitis C screening and treatment

IDWeek: Opioid-using youth could miss out on hepatitis C screening and treatment | Hepatitis C New Drugs Review | Scoop.it
Only one-third of youths diagnosed with opioid use disorder were tested for hepatitis C, according to the results of a large sample presented at IDWeek.
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Cureus | Hepatocellular Carcinoma Occurrence and Recurrence in Hepatitis C-infected Patients Treated with Direct-acting Antivirals

Cureus | Hepatocellular Carcinoma Occurrence and Recurrence in Hepatitis C-infected Patients Treated with Direct-acting Antivirals | Hepatitis C New Drugs Review | Scoop.it
From a total of 497 treated HCV-infected patients, 233 (46.88 %) had cirrhosis, out of which 16 (6.86%) were reported to develop HCC during or after DAA therapy was initiated. The remaining 217 (93.1%) cirrhotic patients did not develop HCC. As per our comparison, achieving SVR in cirrhotic patients should not preclude HCC screening, and more studies are needed to assess the risk of HCC in patients who achieve SVR but have a high FIB-4 score. In fact, patients who do not achieve SVR may be at a higher risk of eventually developing HCC and may be candidates for closer surveillance. 
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