Inca Craft Production
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1996 Craft production and mobilization strategies in the Inka empire

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Craft production can be seen as a means for the elites to remain in power. The funding of public projects like that to produce cups and bowls for a feast were often taken on by these state elites; mainly In order to maintain power and further establish greater messages of influence. This idea is repeated when applied to the allocation of the resources needed for these extensive public projects.

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Craft Production, Exchange, and Political Power in the Pre-Incaic Andes

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This article by Kevin Vaughn explains craft production as the origin of the great Inca empire. He describes the social dynamic of the Andes region to be heavily focused on craft production and explains how it related to accumulation of wealth and power. He provides anthropological evidence for these clams.

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Inca pottery as culinary equipment: Food, feasting and gender in imperial state design

Inca pottery as culinary equipment: Food, feasting and gender in imperial state design
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In this article published by the The Society for American Archeology Tamara Bray looks at ethnographic sources in tandem with inca vessels to make inferences about their function and significance. 

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Dissertation: Metals for the Inka: Craft Production and Empire in the Quebrada de Tarapacá, Northern Chile

Dissertation: Metals for the Inka: Craft Production and Empire in the Quebrada de Tarapacá, Northern Chile
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This paper by Colleen Zori of UCLA, outlines craft production as a measure of "imperial conquest ." She describes how direct and indirect influences of imperial rule are reflected in overall craft production, and general organizational structure (p 30-36). These influences include methods of taxation, levies, and creation of enclaves.

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