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Earth at Night 2012

Earth at Night 2012 | In and About the News | Scoop.it
This site not only allows you to look at the lights across the earth at night, but also to drill down to specific areas, and to see a map image and then overlay the night view.
This map is a great way to explore population across the world. What do the night lights tell us?
According to the website the images were taken over nine days in April 2012 and thirteen days in October 2012. To get the clarity required took 312 orbits. For more information check out the website.
Via Beth Dichter
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HELP THE KIDS, BOSTON CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL, FROM THE JORDAN RICH SHOW!

HELP THE KIDS, BOSTON CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL, FROM THE JORDAN RICH SHOW! | In and About the News | Scoop.it

Boston Children’s Hospital supplies hope to children from all over the world.   It’s vital that we support this incredible institution so that research, treatment and care for our kids may continue.

 

In return for your kindness, I’ll send you a copy of “For the Children XII,” my latest booklet of inspiring stories, poetry, recipes and illustrations by celebrated artists.


Kindly send your donation of $20.00 (or whatever you can afford) payable to BOSTON CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL to:


Jordan Rich

WBZ Radio

1170 Soldiers Field Rd.

Boston, Ma. 02134

 

Or, order online via PayPal at:

www.jordanrich.com.

Have a great holiday season and thank you for your generosity and kindness. Your donation means healing and hope for our precious kids.

 

Peace,

 

Jordan Rich

WBZ

Jordan Rich
Chart Productions, inc
WBZ Radio

 

www.jordanrich.com
www.chartproductions.com

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FORCE (Facing Our Risk of Cancer Empowered): Clinical Trials & Resesarch

FORCE (Facing Our Risk of Cancer Empowered): Clinical Trials & Resesarch | In and About the News | Scoop.it
FORCE is a national nonprofit organization devoted to improving the lives of people and families affected by hereditary breast and ovarian cancer.

 

Weighing the Risks and Benefits of Screening Mammography

by Sue Friedman


A recent research article has questioned the benefits while highlighting the potential harms of mammogram screening in women of average risk for breast cancer. The study raises some valid concerns; more research is needed to refine breast-screening guidelines to improve outcomes. But it does not provide the definitive answers needed to dismiss mammography as a screening tool.

 

The research report looked at large population-based statistics over three decades to determine if mammograms are leading to a decrease in later-stage cancers by detecting more early-stage cancers. The study found that although mammograms found more early cancers, they did not lead to a similar reduction in cancers diagnosed at a late stage. The authors conclude that while mammograms find more cancers, for most women, they do not improve survival or outcomes. The authors cite the concern that mammograms find breast changes that are precancers that may never actually develop into cancer or threaten a woman’s life. The authors go on to state that as many as one-third of breast cancers may be overdiagnosed and treated, leading to side effects and consequences that can impact women’s quality of life.

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10 Journalists Slain in Mexico in 2010

10 Journalists Slain in Mexico in 2010 | In and About the News | Scoop.it
Always a dangerous place to be an aggressive reporter, Mexico in 2010 became a killing ground, with 10 reporters slain and several more reported missing.

 

Clearly, freedom of the press is not quite the same everywhere.

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When a gadget elevates into a tool ...

The Olympus E-PM2 that I ordered on Black Friday is on the slow brown truck from the East Coast. It should get here early next week. That’s okay because I’m not particularly excited about the purchase. I came to this realization and it surprised me.

 

It’s not that I don’t want the camera. I do. It’s just that I already know what to expect. I know the interface. I know the menus and after owning 3 cameras, I know the Olympus Pens. I realize that for the first time, this camera has become a tool instead of just a gadget.

 

Gadgets are fun. I get them from time to time. The last camera gadget was my $70 Lumix point and shoot. I bought it because I wanted to figure it out — learn how to make good-looking photographs from a low-end camera. But the Olympus is different. I suspect I don’t need to figure anything out. In the store, I was able to reprogram the buttons and use it without a second thought. The gadget factor is not there.

 

Tools are productive. I bought this camera for a specific purpose. I wanted to add a stop or so of improved high ISO performance and perhaps a bit more dynamic range. I’m not going to be a better photographer with this camera. It’s not going to change my style. I’m just expecting this new tool to improve my technical image quality. ISO 1600 and perhaps ISO 3200 may now become common place. This is what I’m excited about — not the new camera.

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Dallas Icon Larry Hagman Dead at 81

Dallas Icon Larry Hagman Dead at 81 | In and About the News | Scoop.it

TV icon Larry Hagman, best known for playing the iconic J.R. Ewing on both the original Dallas on CBS and the current incarnation on TNT, passed away on Friday at Medical City Dallas hospital from cancer complications. He was 81.

 

Hagman — shortly after TNT’s update was announced in summer 2011 — revealed that he was being treated for “a very common and treatable form of cancer,” later specified as Stage II throat cancer. After enduring chemotherapy and radiation treatment, Hagman announced in mid-2012. “I beat that thing. I am in remission now. All good!”

 

Dallas is currently in production on its second season, scheduled to premiere on Jan. 28, 2013.

 

“Larry was back in his beloved Dallas, re-enacting the iconic role he loved most,” the Hagman family said in a statement. “Larry’s family and close friends had joined him in Dallas for the Thanksgiving holiday. When he passed, he was surrounded by loved ones. It was a peaceful passing, just as he had wished for. The family requests privacy at this time.”

 

Hagman is survived by his wife of more than 58 years, Maj, who is currently suffering from Alzheimer’s disease and was relocated into a nursing home in 2011.

 

Read More at: http://tvline.com/2012/11/23/larry-hagman-dead-at-age-81/#utm_source=copypaste&utm_campaign=referral

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'Lincoln' leads strong but has little in support

'Lincoln' leads strong but has little in support | In and About the News | Scoop.it

It’s that time of year as the multiplexes across the country are beginning to fill up with the films that studios are pushing as their high end award caliber films to the general public and will undoubtedly be mentioned in the same phrase as “and the Oscar goes to…” Open today at the Varsity cinemas here in Toronto and rolling out in theatres all across the country on November 16th from our friends at Walt Disney Motion Pictures is the biopic that takes a look at one of the most tumultuous times in American history into the mindset of one of the most important presidents that United States has ever had. It’s time to take a look into a slice of the life of “Lincoln”.

 

Starring Daniel Day-Lewis

 

Directed by Steven Spielberg

 

“Lincoln” is a revealing drama that focuses on the 16th President's tumultuous final months in office. In a nation divided by war and the strong winds of change, Lincoln (Day Lewis) pursues a course of action designed to end the war, unite the country and abolish slavery. With the moral courage and fierce determination to succeed, his choices during this critical moment will change the fate of generations to come.

 

A pet project of director Steven Spielberg’s for years, this story of “Lincoln” while fascinating is admittedly a little uneven at the best of times. With keen eye, this story centering around the civil war only has one actual brief battle scene as the rest of it unfolds in the halls of power, Spielberg effectively makes these sets seem larger than life and grandiose mirroring these bright halls of power with a variety of dimly lit back rooms where the decisions were actually made. There is no doubt that along with long time collaborator Cinematographer Janusz Kaminski, Spielberg has made a stunning and beautiful looking film, unfortunately it is a film that revolves around one stellar performance with little to no character development around it.

 

Daniel Day Lewis truly stepped into the aura and vibe of President Abraham Lincoln and there is no doubt that Spielberg took great joy in shooting this as Lewis delivered some fantastic and dramatic speeches, however considering that this entire film was centered around simply getting to the next speech as fast as humanly possible it felt more than a little hollow as we just weren’t every invested in the rest of these characters that surround him. Of the star laden ensemble only Sally Field as Mary Todd Lincoln (despite the notable age difference between the two actors) and Tommy Lee Jones as Thaddeus Stevens lent any emotional gravitas to the struggles that surround all of these characters as hundreds of thousands of young men were dying while these men where in power. It was a little reminiscent of “The Iron Lady” from earlier this year in that had an excellent lead performance, but with little to nothing else surrounding it to make us even care about what happens to any of these characters the results fall more than a little unevenly.

There is no question that as “Lincoln”; Daniel Day-Lewis delivered one of the better performances of his entire career, however a serious of speeches edited together around an important historical event in human history does not make for a great film, and while Spielberg’s obvious reverence for the material is well deserved, not enough reverence was given to crafting a story full of characters that the audience can get invested in.

 

 

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Marilyn Armstrong's comment, December 15, 2012 8:26 PM
After seeing it, I entirely disagree. It was GREAT.
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About Israel and Gaza – It’s more complicated than you can imagine

About Israel and Gaza – It’s more complicated than you can imagine | In and About the News | Scoop.it

I am a citizen of Israel. Actually, I’m a dual citizen of the United States and Israel. I didn’t seek Israel citizenship. I lived there almost 9 years and it was automatically conferred on me as it is on every Jew that comes to live there and stays more than 3 years. I have never seen any reason to renounce citizenship … if indeed that were possible and I’m not at all sure that it is … because given the way things are going around here, an Israeli passport could come in handy if I have to gather the family and make a run for it. Ironic, isn’t it that Israel looks safer sometimes than my peaceful little town in the Blackstone Valley?

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The man who saw the future … WARNING: May contain humor and other inaccuracies! May cause laughter or other unwanted side effects!

The man who saw the future … WARNING: May contain humor and other inaccuracies! May cause laughter or other unwanted side effects! | In and About the News | Scoop.it

WARNING: ALBERT EINSTEIN MAY NOT REALLY HAVE SAID THIS. I HOPE THIS DOES NOT RUIN YOUR DAY, BUT THIS IS HUMOR. PLEASE LAUGH. DO NOT TRY THIS AT HOME. DO NOT TRY THIS WHILE DRIVING.

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BP, supervisors face manslaughter charges; firm to pay $4 billion settlement in Gulf oil spill

BP, supervisors face manslaughter charges; firm to pay $4 billion settlement in Gulf oil spill | In and About the News | Scoop.it
By Steven Mufson, Updated: Thursday, November 15, 1:58 PM

 

The Justice Department announced Thursday that it had charged BP with felony manslaughter for the deaths of 11 people who were killed when the Deepwater Horizon oil rig blew out, sending nearly 5 million barrels of oil into the Gulf of Mexico in 2010.


Attorney General Eric Holder said that federal grand juries had also indicted the two highest- ranking BP supervisors on the Deepwater Horizon rig with 23 counts of criminal wrongdoing, including manslaughter. Holder also announced the indictment of BP's incident commander with lying to and hiding information from Congress.

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Everything Is Going to Be OK

Everything Is Going to Be OK | In and About the News | Scoop.it
"Man's mind stretched to a new idea, never goes back to its original dimensions." -- Oliver Wendell Holmes

 

Finally, some good news.

 

Whether we celebrate the outcome of the election or mourn it, there's good news that's hard to ignore. Some comedian suggested that a win for Obama would be a victory for democracy while a win for Romney would be a victory for comedy, but what happened is really a win for spiritual progress over human stubbornness.

 

How so? Hundreds of millions of dollars invested in selling deception failed. TV attack ads and math-less promises made little difference. Campaign redistricting, voter suppression, threats to employees... a formidable range of intimidation tactics failed to produce. That's spiritual progress, because what prevailed was a greater awareness of truth than illusion.

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No, Virginia, the 2012 Election’s Hyperpartisanship Will Not Last Forever | Voice4America

No, Virginia, the 2012 Election’s Hyperpartisanship Will Not Last Forever | Voice4America | In and About the News | Scoop.it

Published November 10, 2012 | By articles
No, Virginia, the 2012 Election’s Hyperpartisanship Will Not Last Forever

 

Independent’s Eye, by Joe Gandelman

 

DEAR COLUMNIST: I am 13 years old and in the 8th grade.

Some of my friends say America will never be able to put back together after the highly divisive Presidential election and that due to hyperpartisanship people will never work together to solve our problems. They say it’s getting almost impossible. Papa says if you hear people say it on TV, in newspapers and on blogs then it must be so. Please tell me the truth: can America truly get together after this election? Can there ever be a change that takes place that could move our country towards real problem-solving, or is this as “good” as it can get?

 

 

Virginia Genericperson

285 Quintessential Ave., Any City, USA

 

Virginia, your friends are wrong. As someone who writes this column, loved political science at Colgate, monitors political shows on radio and TV, and who spends hours surfing the internet to edit and write my centrist blog The Moderate Voice, I know how easy it is to get swept up by the early 21st century’s rages, passions and melodrama.

 

You and your friends are picking up the fact that our politics no longer resemble the kind of politics that made America great — where consensus and compromise were virtues and where politicians perhaps begrudgingly acknowledged the importance of truth and could not blatantly and intentionally ignore it. You’re picking up on the tone of our political culture where rudeness, boorishness and aggressiveness are perceived by some as being intelligent. Our political culture has shifted, but just as things shift,

they can re-shift — and it is in the power of you and other young people to do it.

 

Go back into American history and you’ll find many examples of times when compromise — two principled parties or politicians giving a little, then taking a little to come up with something for the common good that’s supported by more than a power-play faction of people — was a virtue. Legislator and former Secretary of State Henry Clay, Sr. (April 12, 1777 – June 29, 1852) was even called “The Great Compromiser” for his role in the 1820 Missouri Compromise. Partisans known for compromise today face primaries and are replaced by hyperpartisans.

 

You see, Virginia, much of American political culture is now set up to define compromise as a “caving” or weakness, and consensus as being in the inaccurately defined “mushy middle.” It showers those who are the loudest, most outrageous, and most insulting with attention and riches. Some of today’s leaders in both parties do seek compromise and cooperation (note New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie and President Barack Obama during Hurricane Sandy) and some may seek consensus, but there are forces that eschew the notion that real political nirvana is when a policy garners the maximum number of populace’s participants to buy into it.

 

American history is filled with figures that cherished the idea of consensus, even while assertively promoting strong ideological ideals: Abraham Lincoln, Teddy Roosevelt, Franklin Roosevelt, Dwight Eisenhower, JFK, LBJ and many more. Gil Troy, in his superb book, “Leading from the Center: Why Moderates Make the Best Presidents,” classifies Ronald Reagan as a “moderate” because he successfully used compromise and consensus.
Strong work to sandbag compromise and consensus. Ideological movements that demonize opponents and seek to shrink once-big political tents. Corporations selling and broadcasting popular talk shows and cable shows that rake in big bucks by harnessing, communicating, and enlarging resentment and anger to build audience share that’s then sold to advertisers. The ideological cable channels increasingly celebrate political incivility.


Still, there courageous politicians and media types and America has a strong center. Many young people in their teens and 20s that I talked to and emailed these past two years make it clear they look with revulsion on hyperpartisanship, and the verbal and written screaming and insulting associated with it. Many wish there was a strong third party movement.


The fact you and others ask this question means you may — and can — make it different. Other generations made it different in positive (the Greatest Generation) and negative (Baby Boomers) ways. Your generation can do it in a positive way again.



Copyright 2012 Joe Gandelman, distributed exclusively by Cagle Cartoons newspaper syndicate.


Joe Gandelman is a veteran journalist who wrote for newspapers overseas and in the United States. He has appeared on cable news show political panels and is Editor-in-Chief of The Moderate Voice, an Internet hub for independents, centrists and moderates. CNN’s John Avlon named him as one of the top 25 Centrists Columnists and Commentators.

 

He can be reached at jgandelman@themoderatevoice.com.

 

Read more: http://voice4america.com/articles/2012/11/10/no-virginia-the-2012-elections-hyperpartisanship-will-not-last-forever.html#ixzz2C1hV6Mqw

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Our house is divided … what next?

Our house is divided … what next? | In and About the News | Scoop.it
I got more than a thousand hits the other day, more than half for a reblog of Presidential Election: “Sad and Tragic Day for Our Nation” ? The article resonated, so I picked it up as soon as I read it. I couldn’t have said it better and thus didn’t try. Apparently millions of other people felt the same way and the post went viral, which is good but not enough.


I feel obliged to point out to those who have failed to notice: THE ELECTION IS OVER.


Barack Obama won. Mitt Romney lost. The winner gets 4 years (or in this case, 4 more years) as President of the United States. The loser makes a gracious concession speech then retires, hopefully to serve his country in some other way and perhaps make another run for office down the road. For now, it’s over. The nation returns to normal.


That’s the way it’s supposed to work. But this time? Apparently not.

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HBO: Mel Brooks and Dick Cavett Together Again: Homepage

HBO: Mel Brooks and Dick Cavett Together Again: Homepage | In and About the News | Scoop.it
The official website for Mel Brooks and Dick Cavett Together Again on HBO, featuring videos, images, schedule information and episode guides.

 

9PM tonight on HBO (EST), but check ... it's on  lot of the HBO channels at various times during the next week.

 

 

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Rhys's Pieces: Royal Hoax

Rhys's Pieces: Royal Hoax | In and About the News | Scoop.it

Royal Hoax


Did you see on the news today that two Australian DJs put in a prank call to Kate's hospital, pretending to be the queen and Prince Charles. The nurse who answered the phone was completely fooled even though the accents were terrible and they both used language no royal would ever use.


When the queen said something about "walking the bloody corgis" that should have been a red flag.

 

I grew up in a genteel household in England and nobody in the queen's generation would use the word bloody. When I came home from my new job at the BBC and said airily that something was "a bloody nuisance" there was silence in the room and one of my aunts said, "So--you've taken to swearing now, have you?"

 

Luckily the hoax was discovered before they were put through to Kate's room. Another dead giveaway might have been that it was five in the morning--Australians never able to get their times right, as I can attest after some weird calls from my family members.

 

But really the nurse must have been clueless. It is highly unlikely that a royal would put through the call. A secretary would establish the contact and then put the queen or Prince Charles on the line. But it does show how easily security can be breached, doesn't it?

And it makes me wonder whether I could make use of a royal hoax in a future Lady Georgie book.

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June Buggie Says End the Violence!

June Buggie Says End the Violence! | In and About the News | Scoop.it

Animal cruelty is a problem in our society.

 

Domestic violence is a problem in our society.

 

But did you know the two often go hand-in-hand?

 

Indeed, 68% of battered women reported violence towards their animals; 87% of these incidents occurred in the presence of the women, and 75% in the presence of the children, to psychologically control and coerce them (NCADV).

 

Disturbed children kill or harm animals to emulate their parents’ conduct, to prevent the abuser from killing the pet, or to take out their aggressions on another victim more helpless than themselves.

 

So those animals that are found horribly mutilated? Animals abandoned in deserted areas or the middle of an Interstate? Animals found dead and stuffed in trash bins? Those could be beloved pets of victims of domestic violence.

 

It’s frightening. Also upsetting is the fact that many women remain in the home with an abuser because they don’t want to leave the animals behind. She fears what will happen to them should she leave, and she has nowhere for her beloved animals to go.

 

For those of us who want to see an end to animal cruelty, we must embrace the magnitude of the problem. If you want to help, here are some things you can do:

 

Find out if domestic violence shelters in your area provide care for pets. If not, help them find a way to get those animals cared for, perhaps through partnerships with animal rescue groups or through the community Humane Society.


If you suspect abuse in a family, offer to care for the pets if she leaves if you’re able to do so for an extended period of time.
Often victims will not talk about abuse inflicted in themselves, but will tell of abuse inflicted on a beloved animal. Start by asking about the pets.


If you work in a vet clinic and you suspect animal abuse, don’t be silent. You will help more than just the animal. You may save a human victim as well.

 

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The End of the World in 2012 | Top Secret Writers

The End of the World in 2012 | Top Secret Writers | In and About the News | Scoop.it

End of Days. Ragnarok. Armageddon. We have heard all of these terms before. These are the terms used throughout the generations to describe the end of the world.

 

Men and women have been prophesizing about the end since the beginning. Each ?prophecy? claims a new era will be ushered in through massive change and, usually, massive loss of human life.

 

The first of these theories started to appear with the emergence of organized religion. It seems that every major religion as an end of the world theory. Even science as had its own end of the world theories, such as millennium bug, giant asteroids, and global warming.

 

The newest theory is the 2012 theory. This theory states that the world will end or, at the very least, drastically change on December 21, 2012. The end of the world in 2012 theory is based on the 5,125-year-long cycle in the Mayan Long Count calendar.

 

The calendar, widely used on Mayan and other Mesoamerican monuments, uses a modified base-20 count to identify a single day by counting the total number of days that has passed since the creation. This creation is given in detail in the Mayan book Popol Vuh.

 

However, this end-of-the-world in 2012 theory is not detailed anywhere on the Mayan Long Count or in the Popol Vuh. The ?end? referred to in these Mayan writings simply mark the end of one count and the beginning of another.

 

The end of the world theory derived from these is actually a modern interpretation. However, this modern interpretation has split into to factions. One faction interprets the ?end? as new era where the world and the beings living in it will experience a change equivalent to a new enlightenment. The other faction is not so optimistic. It is this faction that receives all the media hype with its tales of global destruction and mass human extinction.

 

Who?s right? Well, mainstream science and most Mayan scholars agree: neither. Mainstream science actually views the theories that the Mayan Long Count will usher in a world ending cataclysm are contradicted by simple scientific observations.

 

Mainstream Mayan Historians view theories as a gross misunderstanding of Mayan history and culture. Mayan writing and documents are very hard to come by and the ones that are available do not shed much light on the subject.

 

Neither science nor Mayan history seems to view December 21, 2012 any more significant than December 20 or December 23.

The only significance that December 21, 2012 holds is that it marks the date of the winter solstice. On this day, the shortest day, longest night, and the sun's daily maximum position in the sky is at its lowest can be observed. It could be possible that this was a day of celebration for the ancient Mayans. The winter solstice is a day of celebration for many cultures (ancient and modern) around the world. However, there is no such celebration in present day Mayan culture, and modern-day Mayans do not view the day as significant in any way.

 

Modern day scientists and scholars say that the end-of-the-world in 2012 theory is nothing more than a sensationalized rumor created to sell books, newspapers, and television ads. Believers of the 2012 theory argue that science has been wrong before and December 21, 2012 will throw the Earth and its inhabitants in a period of change and destruction.

 

Who should we believe? Should we go on about our daily lives? Should prepare for the end? With all of the contradictions and hype, what is the average human being to do?

 

My advice: remember Y2K.

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Using Just 10% of Your Brain? Think Again!

Using Just 10% of Your Brain? Think Again! | In and About the News | Scoop.it
Pop quiz: Which of these statements is false?

 

1. We use only 10% of our brain.

2. Environments rich in stimuli improve the brains of preschool children.

3. Individuals learn better when they receive information in their preferred learning style, whether auditory, visual or kinesthetic.

 

If you picked the first one, congratulations. The idea that we use only 10% of our brain is patently false. Yet it so permeates popular culture that, among psychologists and neuroscientists, it is known as the "10% myth."

 

Contrary to popular belief, the entire brain is put to use—unused neurons die and unused circuits atrophy. Reports of neuroimaging research might perpetuate the myth by showing only a small number of areas "lighting up" in a brain scan, but those are just areas that have more than a base line level of activity; the dark regions aren't dormant or unused.

 

Did you agree with the other two statements? If so, you fell into our trap. All three statements are false—or at least not substantiated by scientific evidence. Unfortunately, if you got any of them wrong, you're hardly alone.

 

These "neuromyths," along with others, were presented to 242 primary and secondary school teachers in the Netherlands and the U.K. as part of a study by Sanne Dekker and colleagues at VU University Amsterdam and Bristol University, and just published in the journal Frontiers in Psychology. They found that 47% of the teachers believed the 10% myth. Even more, 76%, believed that enriching children's environments will strengthen their brains.

 

This belief might have emerged from evidence that rats raised in cages with amenities like exercise wheels, tunnels and other rats showed better cognitive abilities and improvements in brain structure compared with rats that grew up isolated in bare cages. But such experiments show only that a truly impoverished and unnatural environment leads to poorer developmental outcomes than a more natural environment with opportunities to play and interact. It follows that growing up locked in a closet or otherwise cut off from human contact will impair a child's brain development. It does not follow that "enriching" a child's environment beyond what is already typical—for example, by constant exposure to "Baby Einstein"-type videos—will boost cognitive development.

 

The myth about learning styles was the most popular: 94% of the teachers believed that students perform better when lessons are delivered in their preferred learning style. Indeed, students do have preferences about how they learn; the problem is that these preferences have little to do with how effectively they learn.

 

Cognitive psychologist Daniel Willingham explained this conundrum in his 2009 book "Why Don't Students Like School?" In the best tests of the learning-styles theory, researchers first ascertain students' preferred styles and then randomly assign them to a form of instruction that either matches their preferences or doesn't. For example, in one study, students were randomly assigned to memorize a set of objects presented either verbally (as names) or visually (as pictures). Overall, visual presentation led to better memory, but there was no relationship between the learners' preferences and the instruction style. A study comparing "sensing" to "intuitive" learners among medical residents being taught new procedures reached a similar conclusion.

 

Of course, good teachers sense when students are struggling or progressing, and they adjust accordingly. Students with disabilities have individual needs that should be addressed. But a comprehensive review commissioned by the Association for Psychological Science concluded that there's essentially no evidence that customizing instruction formats to match students' preferred learning styles leads to better achievement. This is a knock not on teachers—we are teachers ourselves—but on human intuition, which finds the claim about learning styles so self-evident that it is hard to see how it could be wrong.

 

Our own surveys of the U.S. population have found even more widespread belief in myths about the brain. About two-thirds of the public agreed with the 10% myth. Many also believed that memory works like a video recording or that they can tell when someone is staring at the back of their head.

 

Ironically, in the Dekker group's study, the teachers who knew the most about neuroscience also believed in the most myths. Apparently, teachers who are (admirably) enthusiastic about expanding their knowledge of the mind and brain have trouble separating fact from fiction as they learn. Neuromyths have so much intuitive appeal, and they spread so rapidly in fields like business and self-help, that eradicating them from popular consciousness might be a Sisyphean task. But reducing their influence in the classroom would be a good start.

 

—Mr. Chabris is a psychology professor at Union College. Mr. Simons is a psychology professor at the University of Illinois. They are the authors of "The Invisible Gorilla, and Other Ways Our Intuitions Deceive Us."


A version of this article appeared November 17, 2012, on page C3 in the U.S. edition of The Wall Street Journal, with the headline: Using Just 10% of Your Brain? Think Again.

 

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An Open Letter to President Obama from Michael Moore

An Open Letter to President Obama from Michael Moore | In and About the News | Scoop.it

By Michael Moore, Michael Moore.com
20 November 2012

 

Good luck on your journeys overseas this week, and congratulations on decisively winning your second term as our president! The first time you won four years ago, most of us couldn't contain our joy and found ourselves literally in tears over your victory.

 

This time, it was more like breathing a huge sigh of relief. But, like the smooth guy you are, you scored the highest percentage of the vote of any Democrat since Lyndon Johnson, and you racked up the most votes for a Democratic president in the history of the United States (the only one to receive more votes than you was ... you, in '08!). You are the first Democrat to get more than 50% of the vote twice in a row since Franklin D. Roosevelt.

 

This was truly another historic election and I would like to take a few minutes of your time to respectfully ask that your second term not resemble your first term.

 

It's not that you didn't get anything done. You got A LOT done. But there are some very huge issues that have been left unresolved and, dammit, we need you to get some fight in you. Wall Street and the uber-rich have been conducting a bloody class war for over 30 years and it's about time they were stopped.

 

I know it is not in your nature to be aggressive or confrontational. But, please, Barack - DO NOT listen to the pundits who are telling you to make the "grand compromise" or move to the "center" (FYI - you're already there). Your fellow citizens have spoken and we have rejected the crazed ideology of this Republican Party and we insist that you forcefully proceed in bringing about profound change that will improve the lives of the 99%. We're done hoping. We want real change. And, if we can't get it in the second term of a great and good man like you, then really - what's the use? Why are we even bothering? Yes, we're that discouraged and disenchanted.

At your first post-election press conference last Wednesday you were on fire. The way you went all "Taxi Driver" on McCain and company ("You talkin' to me?") was so brilliant and breathtaking I had to play it back a dozen times just to maintain the contact high. Jesus, that look - for a second I thought laser beams would be shooting out of your eyes! MORE OF THAT!! PLEASE!!

 

In the weeks after your first election you celebrated by hiring the Goldman Sachs boys and Wall Street darlings to run our economy. Talk about a buzzkill that I never fully recovered from. Please - not this time. This time take a stand for all the rest of us - and if you do, tens of millions of us will not only have your back, we will swoop down on Congress in a force so large they won't know what hit them (that's right, McConnell - you're on the retirement list we've put together for 2014).

 

BUT - first you have to do the job we elected you to do. You have to take your massive 126-electoral vote margin and just go for it.

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Turkeygeddon: The Thirteen Best Turkey Attack Videos

Turkeygeddon: The Thirteen Best Turkey Attack Videos | In and About the News | Scoop.it

Turkeys: traditional holiday roast, are some bad-ass birds. Turkey attacks are apparently quite common: wild turkey populations are on the rise, with around 3 million of them in the US. According to experts, birds that "get accustomed to suburban life apparently start to see people as other turkeys" and naturally defend their turf.

 

Should you have the misfortune to happen upon a vicious turkey, here are some tips gleaned from the videos below: sticks are a good defense. Mailmen are not, as turkeys are known to "have something against the US Postal Service." Hide in your car. Do not taunt them. Try to appear less like a rival turkey. If you're dealing with a group of turkeys — called a rafter, a gang, or, less formally, a gobble — well, good luck.

 

Last year was all about the best deep-fried turkey disaster videos, but here now, the thirteen best turkey attacks videos around. Ordered by the level of terror — from a little scary to absolutely terrifying.


Great videos for your Thanksgiving enlightenment.

 

On a personal note: You can't make this stuff up. I had a turkey attack me IN my car not all that long ago. They don't call them turkeys for nothing. They'll take on anyone of anything! Watch the skies, Keep watching the skies!!

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Gingrich on Romney’s ‘gifts’ comments: ‘It’s nuts’

Gingrich on Romney’s ‘gifts’ comments: ‘It’s nuts’ | In and About the News | Scoop.it
Like several other prominent Republicans, Newt Gingrich slammed Mitt Romney's assertion in a conference call with donors last week that he lost the 2012 presidential election because of "gifts" President Barack Obama gave to blacks, Hispanics and...
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Android really is the new Windows | ZDNet

Android really is the new Windows | ZDNet | In and About the News | Scoop.it

Summary: The figures don't lie: Android not only has almost three-quarters of global mobile device sales, but it's outselling PCs too. So the Linux-based OS is the new Windows, not only due to its ubiquity, but because it represents a key aspect of Windows that Microsoft is throwing away: openness.

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From Windows 8 to Windows 7: why I downgraded | ZDNet

From Windows 8 to Windows 7: why I downgraded | ZDNet | In and About the News | Scoop.it
Windows 8 is certainly an ambitious effort on the behalf of Microsoft, but it seems I'm missing something that's keeping me from enjoying it and I'm curious to see who feels the same.

 

Everything I've read and heard about Windows 8 makes me eager to avoid it. It promises nothing I want and many things I don't want. Fortunately, my computers are mostly new and by the time they need upgrading, I hope Microsoft will have come to their senses.

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Wessays ™: 1094 Groupthink

Wessays ™: 1094 Groupthink | In and About the News | Scoop.it

Friday, November 09, 2012
1094 Groupthink

 

Shlomo Tzedaka, the last Bronx Jew, is sitting in his kitchen with the usual sugar cube in his cheek and the glass of tea on the table before him. This is a new dinette set and Shlomo bought it only reluctantly when his previous furniture became too battered, scarred and rusted even for his fading eyesight. (Wessay™ #607 10/5/09.) Across the table is Hermy from Upstairs, the next to last Bronx Jew.

Shlomo is listening and nodding his head and trying to be a good neighbor. Again. Hermy has been here a few times in recent days, urging a vote for Mitt Romney.

 

“Voting for Obama is like pulling the trigger on Israel,” says Hermy. Shlomo nods. “Voting for Romney, that’ll mean finally peace among nations,” Hermy says.

 

“Hermy, who pays your medical bills?”

 

“I do.”

 

“No you don’t. You pay mine. I pay yours.”

 

“C’mon Shlo, this isn’t 1932, it’s 2012. This socialism has gone too far.”

 

“Hermy, you channeling the late Donald Trump?”

 

“Trump is dead?”

 

“Just because he’s still walking around doesn’t mean he’s alive. You sound like the worst of Donald with a little bit of Leona Helmsley thrown in for good measure.”

 

“Maybe you want to give up your Social Security and your Medicare and your Medicaid --and mine-- because you think this plastic yokel from Michigan and Massachusetts is going to Nuke Iran? Let me tell you something. He wouldn’t nuke Iran. Or if he did, the commies would nuke us back. For this you give up everything America means?”

 

Hermy looks thoughtful and takes a sip of his own tea.

 

So went the discussion. A third visitor left before fists began to fly. But the truth of the matter is while young people and women and African Americans and Latinos and transgender Albanian new citizens and other picked-on groups are keeping their heads on straight, Jews seem not to be.

 

Seventy or so percent for Obama. Maybe 68, maybe 75. But in any case, less than in ‘08.

 

The Republicans for Mitt failed after spending pushcart-loads of money on the campaign. Good. Serves them right. Just like Rove and his team who couldn’t get to first base at any time in any of the nine innings.

 

But Jews for Romney made some inroads. The rightward push has been on for several decades now. What, you all want to be Michael Savage? Or Shelly “Addled” Adelson?

 

What happened to tradition, folks?

 

Well, there is the tradition of contrarianism. But this is extreme. You think you vote for Romney and you get a dog carrier for your car roof? Or a right to change your mind about every issue every day? Let’s hope at least you learned how effective flip-flopping is and you’ll flip back to your sanity before the whole country flops.

 

The Associated Press reported that anti-Obama groups spent $380 million to defeat him. Think of what good could have been done with that kind of money used constructively.

 

And this money is from “business people” who claim to know how to invest wisely.

 

Maybe it’s time to consider a complete ban on political advertising. At least the money won’t be flushed away, clogging septic tanks and sewer systems when it could build a hospital or rehabilitate storm damaged houses.

 

I’m Wes Richards. My opinions are my own but you’re welcome to them. ®


Please address comments and death threats to wesrichards@gmail.com


© WJR 2012

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No, Virginia, the 2012 Election’s Hyperpartisanship Will Not Last Forever | Voice4America

No, Virginia, the 2012 Election’s Hyperpartisanship Will Not Last Forever | Voice4America | In and About the News | Scoop.it

Published November 10, 2012 | By articles
No, Virginia, the 2012 Election’s Hyperpartisanship Will Not Last Forever

 

Independent’s Eye by Joe Gandelman

 

DEAR COLUMNIST: I am 13 years old and in the 8th grade.

“Some of my friends say America will never be able to put back together after the highly divisive Presidential election and that due to hyperpartisanship people will never work together to solve our problems. They say it’s getting almost impossible. Papa says if you hear people say it on TV, in newspapers and on blogs then it must be so. Please tell me the truth: can America truly get together after this election? Can there ever be a change that takes place that could move our country towards real problem-solving, or is this as “good” as it can get?

 

Virginia Genericperson

285 Quintessential Ave., Any City, USA

 

Virginia, your friends are wrong. As someone who writes this column, loved political science at Colgate, monitors political shows on radio and TV, and who spends hours surfing the internet to edit and write my centrist blog The Moderate Voice, I know how easy it is to get swept up by the early 21st century’s rages, passions and melodrama.

 

You and your friends are picking up the fact that our politics no longer resemble the kind of politics that made America great — where consensus and compromise were virtues and where politicians perhaps begrudgingly acknowledged the importance of truth and could not blatantly and intentionally ignore it. You’re picking up on the tone of our political culture where rudeness, boorishness and aggressiveness are perceived by some as being intelligent. Our political culture has shifted, but just as things shift, they can re-shift — and it is in the power of you and other young people to do it.

 

Go back into American history and you’ll find many examples of times when compromise — two principled parties or politicians giving a little, then taking a little to come up with something for the common good that’s supported by more than a power-play faction of people — was a virtue. Legislator and former Secretary of State Henry Clay, Sr. (April 12, 1777 – June 29, 1852) was even called “The Great Compromiser” for his role in the 1820 Missouri Compromise. Partisans known for compromise today face primaries and are replaced by hyperpartisans.

 

Read more: http://voice4america.com/articles/2012/11/10/no-virginia-the-2012-elections-hyperpartisanship-will-not-last-forever.html#ixzz2C1ETKf7Y

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