Experiential Learning
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Experiential Learning
Inspiring examples, thought provoking research and the latest ideas on issues relating to creating powerful learning experiences, learning at the edge of our comfort and measuring the impact of experiential learning.
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About Experiential Learning

About Experiential Learning | Experiential Learning | Scoop.it

Our aim with this site –Experiential Learning - is to share information and resources on how to create powerful learning experiences. We believe that experience is the best teacher and much of our work focuses on providing experiences from which people can learn about themselves, about working with others and about the world around them. Our hope is that as we learn about new tools and thinking in this area, you can learn as well.

 

We are Matthew, Amanda and David, three members of Emerging World – an organisation that provides experiences that enable leaders to transform the way they think and act to succeed in the reality of fast-changing, complex business environments.At Emerging World we strive for a world where leaders behave authentically, companies succeed responsibly and every one of us has the opportunity to achieve our potential. 

 

Within our work we are privileged to explore the frontiers of leadership, corporate volunteering, experiential learning and mutually beneficial business. We are excited to share our insights on these topics with the hope that this enables all of us to learn, grow and connect.

 

We hope you enjoy digesting what is curated here. You're welcome to connect and find out more at:

 

Emerging World:  www.emergingworld.com  

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We’ve been structuring brainstorm sessions all wrong

We’ve been structuring brainstorm sessions all wrong | Experiential Learning | Scoop.it

Amy Nauiokas argues that the traditional framework for brainstorms involves identifying a problem, listing solutions within a set of parameters, and then choosing the best.

But research on creativity and innovation suggests that truly innovative solutions result not from searching for a “correct answer,” but from the collision of different ideas, perspectives and life experiences.

Rather than encouraging convergent thinking, as traditional brainstorm sessions do, the goal should be to encourage divergent thinking: the practice of finding new ways to look at a problem and generating multiple solutions. In divergent thinking, the emphasis isn’t to agree on the best idea—it’s to get as far away as possible from the most obvious answer.


Via David Hain
Matthew Farmer's insight:

This is an interesting take on a management stalwart - the brainstorm.  I'm involved in quite a few brainstorming sessions with different organizations and I'm often interested to see how groups norm around this kind of activity.  I was always taught that 'any idea is a good idea' and no evaluation should be made until the 'storming' session is over but not everyone thinks that way.

 

What I like about this approach, is the acknowledgement of the power of colliding perspectives.  Not only do they help us to see and think differently but they also help us learn as well!

 

Matthew Farmer

Emerging World

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David Hain's curator insight, January 8, 6:12 AM

Kids do better than adults at creativity. We need to actively encourage and read divergent thinking, yet most organisations do the opposite!

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Why Experiential Learning Should Be Part Of Your Employee Training

Why Experiential Learning Should Be Part Of Your Employee Training | Experiential Learning | Scoop.it
Letting your employees get their hands dirty while practicing a new task means they're much more likely to remember the lesson.

 

There are a lot of different learning styles out there; not everyone is suited to listening to a lecture, then going off to perform a task or follow a procedure. Employee training is needed not only to establish expectations on tasks but to impart company goals and culture.


One way to get everyone up to speed is through experiential learning, a process where students or employees get their hands dirty while practicing a new task, then reflecting on what happened. The process has a number of advantages, including employing multiple senses and emotional connections when training, in order to create stronger memories.

 

 

 

Emerging World's insight:

This article sees members of the of Forbes Coaches Council talk about why they favour the use of experiential learning to train employees.

 

The brief article provides interesting and relevant views on experiential learning, how it can impact employee engagement and change mindsets of participants.

 

Emerging World

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Ten Steps to Building a Learning Culture

Ten Steps to Building a Learning Culture | Experiential Learning | Scoop.it

This piece from Marc Rosenburg describes important considerations for truly building a learning culture inside your organization. According to Rosenburg, "A learning culture is an environment that celebrates and rewards learning, incentivises people to freely share what they know, and helps them to change based on the acquisition of new skills and knowledge. We all like to think we work in a positive learning culture, but that’s not always the case.

 

There’s no question that learning is likely to fail if it’s poorly designed, the content is weak, or the technology doesn’t work. But learning will absolutely fail if the culture doesn’t support it.

 

But it doesn’t have to be this way. Here are 10 key steps to building a positive learning culture in your organization:

  1. Start with leadership. Culture begins at the top. If senior leadership doesn’t support a learning culture, no one else will. 
  2. Expand the mission.You’re going nowhere if you simply equate learning with training. Learning—individual and organizational—is much broader than courses. Don’t make the mistake of talking “learning” but doing only “training.” 
  3. Get buy-in from the front line. If you want employees to learn, make sure their supervisors learn first. You can’t expect them to get behind something they don’t understand themselves. B
  4. Get the content right. 
  5. Get the technology right. It’s not just about making sure the technology works, but making sure it’s the right technology for the right use. Be careful the technology doesn’t get in the way of learning, or that you are not using more tech than you need.
  6. Ensure readiness to learn. One of the biggest factors in fostering a poor learning culture is providing learning programs to people who aren’t ready for them or who don’t need them. This can be terribly demotivating. 
  7. Communicate for the long term. 
  8. Provide for learning transfer.  The connection between job performance and learning is a key to building a sustainable learning culture.
  9. Demonstrate success. Better to have a small success than a big failure. Demonstration projects, pilots, and proof-of-concept work are all essential in building support for learning. 
  10. Measure results and provide feedback. You want to measure how much is learned, but perhaps more important from a culture perspective, you want to measure the value people attach to learning. 

 

Learning fails when nobody cares"

Matthew Farmer's insight:

In my continuing search for insights in how to move organisations from a training culture to an organisational culture, I came across this piece.  As with all 'top 10 things to do" lists, the suggestions are a lot easier said that done but its's good to begin to build an understanding of what needs to be considered...

 

Matthew

www.emergingworld.com 

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Experiences to Enable Leadership Across Boundaries

Experiences to Enable Leadership Across Boundaries | Experiential Learning | Scoop.it

The skills and capabilities required of corporate leaders today continue to evolve in an increasingly demanding environment. To be effective in supporting leaders to meet these demands organizations need to adopt innovative solutions in leadership development.

Increasingly, global corporations are looking to immersive experiences as a way to enable leaders to test and develop abilities in a safe but challenging environment.

Cargill is one such global organisation. They have developed ‘Leading Across Boundaries’ (LAB) an immersive experience in which senior leaders from one area of the Cargill business are partnered with another area of the business in a different geography.

Matthew Farmer's insight:

Immersive leadership development interventions such as Cargill's LAB program stretch participants in new and different ways preparing them to take on new challenges.  When the context is also aligned with the future development of the company, the return on investment on such program gets even higher as they deliver not just for the participant but also build the capacity of strategically-aligned partner organizations and support the company's longer term market development strategy.

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Experiential learning: What’s missing in most change programs

Experiential learning: What’s missing in most change programs | Experiential Learning | Scoop.it

Successful transformations demand new capabilities. To build them, experiential learning leverages the intimate link between knowledge and experience.

Becky Willmoth's insight:

This McKinsey quarterly article highlights how leading organisations are struggling to keep pace with the changes required by the ever evolving business environment, with research revealing that two-thirds of business transformations do not adequately meet their objectives.

 

The authors argue that transformational aspirations require a skilled workforce, ready to achieve the change mission. However, whilst organisations are making significant investment in learning and development, very few of these development programs are resulting in behavioural change in the workplace. Experiential learning is identified as the solution to address this.

 

At Emerging World, we have completed extensive research regarding the impact of a particular type of experiential learning, Corporate International Service Learning (CISL), in which employees travel across international borders and apply their work-based skills to projects that deliver a positive social impact. Using Kirkpatrick’s levels of learning to identify the depth of an individual’s learning, we have identified that CISL experiences result in behaviour changes that are both considerable and enduring, lasting for many years after the experience itself.

 

Emerging World

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Busting the myths of 70:20:10

Busting the myths of 70:20:10 | Experiential Learning | Scoop.it

'Apparently there is no evidence that 70:20:10 works'. However, this is myth and new work from Charles Jennings  & Laura Overton addressses this myth head-on .

 

According to their new report due to be published on April 21st, those applying new models of learning such as 70:20:10 are:

  • 5x as likely to be able to attract talent
  • 4x as likely to respond faster to business change
  • 3x as likely to report improvements in staff motivation  
  • 2x as likely to report improvements in customer satisfaction scores

You can access the results here. Download 70+20+10=100: The Evidence Behind the Numbers from Towards Maturity.

 

Other .70:20:10 myths in the firing line include:

  • The ratios of 70:20:10 are fixed. Common sense says that’s impossible and – ironic as it sounds – it really isn’t about the numbers.
  • 70:20:10 is a dogmatic rule. No it’s not, it’s simply a model designed to help L&D professionals do their jobs better.
  • 70:20:10 implies courses don’t work. Again not true. The 70:20:10 model looks at the most appropriate, holistic way to solve business and performance problems, and a course may be part of the solution.
  • Including elements of social learning into courses is ‘doing’  70:20:10. Just bolting on a social forum to learning isn’t really getting to the heart of what the model is all about.
  • 70:20:10 is a just a way to cut costs. No – but organisations using 70:20:10 are more efficient and get better results.

 

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Matthew Farmer's insight:

Athough the 70:20:10 framework is not fixed, it's a very helpful paradigm for considering how to structure and organize learning functions and learning programs.  It's also interesting to read about impending research that demonstrates its effectiveness.

 

Matthew

Emerging World

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Why Tomorrow’s Leaders Shouldn’t Mimic the Leaders of Today

Why Tomorrow’s Leaders Shouldn’t Mimic the Leaders of Today | Experiential Learning | Scoop.it

I’d like to discuss what I see our leaders of tomorrow needing. Leaders of tomorrow will not necessarily be people who rise up through the ranks of an organization, sticking to some long-held hierarchical path to achieve a pinnacle. The pace of our world frankly can’t afford the time for this kind of trajectory.

 

The ability to see, adapt to, and even seek out change should be in the top 3 criteria for leaders, but how many leadership development and corporate mentoring programs themselves lead with how-to-change coursework?

Emerging World's insight:

Experiential learning programs often require significant change and adaptability from those participating. Individuals are able to test their abilities in an unknown environment, removed from hierarchies and networks, learning to sit comfortably with ambiguity and welcome the opportunity of the unknown.

 

Emerging World

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Practice and the Development of Expertise: Part 2

Practice and the Development of Expertise: Part 2 | Experiential Learning | Scoop.it

Expertise is the result of effortful, progressive practice on authentic tasks accompanied by relevant feedback and support, with self-reflection and correction. The research team have labeled this activity “Deliberate Practice”. Others have called it deep practice and intentional practice. It entails considerable, specific, and sustained efforts to do something.


Becky Willmoth's insight:

In this second blog in a three-part series on Practice and the Development of Expertise, author Tom Gram identifies how the deliberate nature of an experience is important to support learning. He identifies six elements for are necessary for “deliberate” practice:


  1. It must be designed to improve performance
  2. It must be based on authentic tasks
  3. The practice must be challenging
  4. The learner must receive immediate feedback on results
  5. Reflection and adjustment should be supported
  6. 10,000 hours of commitment are required for true expertise

 

Having supported individuals and groups through experiential learning programs, many of these elements certainly resonate. In particular, providing a real life challenge that stretches the learner, but with opportunity to reflect, enables them to adapt their behaviour, testing new approaches in a continuous cycle of development. This can provide startling transformation in learners’ abilities, abilities that not only endure but continue to develop in the long term.

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Learning in the Modern Workplace is a mix of Experiences

Learning in the Modern Workplace is a mix of Experiences | Experiential Learning | Scoop.it

This infographic taken from Jane Hart's book Modern Workplace Learning explains that shows how learning in the modern workplace is not just about training and e-learning but is a mix of both company-organised and personal experiences.


L&D departments can no longer design, deliver and manage all learning experiences.  Indeed they should not.


Via stevebatch
Emerging World's insight:

It is very helpful to recognise that so much of learning can come from individually driven work experiences and to support individuals to maximise the learning value so that it sticks.  But a few words of caution


1) the power of other humans to help individuals reflect and process should not be underestimated


2) a distinction needs to be made between Learning and Development.  


While models that seek to break workplace learning down into bite size chunks have value, developmental experiences are longer lasting and more profound and don't necessarily break down in the same way.

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Amanda Bowman: Corporate International Service Learning – Adding some ‘CISL’ to Companies’ Sustainable Development Partnerships - Business Fights Poverty

Amanda Bowman: Corporate International Service Learning – Adding some ‘CISL’ to Companies’ Sustainable Development Partnerships - Business Fights Poverty | Experiential Learning | Scoop.it

By Amanda Bowman, Business Development and Partnerships Director, Emerging World
 
There’s no doubt that the development journey that led to the announcement of the SDGs last month in New York was more inclusive...

amandabowman's insight:

This blog, from Emerging World's Amanda Bowman shows how this exciting form of experiential learning can have a strong impact on social issues and civil society partners as well as on learning and development. 

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How to Design Work Projects for Maximum Learning

How to Design Work Projects for Maximum Learning | Experiential Learning | Scoop.it

At some point, you have to stop listening to experts and start doing something real. That is why live business projects can be powerful vehicles for learning, especially when they aim for dramatic outcomes on a tight timeframe.

Becky Willmoth's insight:

This article from HBR outlines how enabling leaders to tackle real business challenges through a focused but stretching project offers unique opportunities to develop the leadership skills required for a VUCA world.  The author highlights how such experiential learning challenges require leaders to collaborate across units or functions to explore innovative solutions, developing skills at leading without formal authority. In addition they learn how to make it safe to fail in small, fast ways to discover the best solutions.

 

In our experience when these business projects take place in emerging markets the learning is enhanced further. Removing leaders from the structures and hierarchies that frame their working practices unlocks new possibilities, compels collaboration and accelerates innovation. It also facilitates the reflection needed to embed learning, resulting in behaviour changes that continue long after the business project is completed. 

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5 Ways to Boost Informal Learning at Work

5 Ways to Boost Informal Learning at Work | Experiential Learning | Scoop.it

Growth engineering cite five ways to boost informal learning at work:

1. Buddy up

Encouraging everyone – not just managers – to take part in coaching and mentoring can help to improve training and get everyone learning. Buddying up new starters with old hands is a great option, as is setting up an informal mentoring scheme.


2. Encourage sharing

Once people get into the habit of sharing their knowledge, social learning will flourish. An intranet, internal forum or even a Learning Management System  will boost learning in this way.


3. Showcase experts

Make sure learners know to whom they can turn in order to discover information and learn more about certain things.


4. Reward social learning

If you see your learners are communicating and collaborating on projects, don’t ignore it – make sure they know how much you appreciate what they’re doing!  Making the social learning process fun with gamification is one way to boost informal learning even more.


5. Make informal learning required

Emerging World's insight:

Social or informal learning is vital way of cementing learning content in learners' minds and spreading learning across organizations.   We can be more deliberate about supporting social learning in our organizations by following these kinds of steps.

 

Emerging World

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Leadership Development Starts Young

Leadership Development Starts Young | Experiential Learning | Scoop.it

"Over recent years, concepts like Carol Dweck’s Growth Mindset and Learning Agility have come of age, yet the opportunity to experience rich, immersive learning that stretches us outside our comfort zone eludes many." write Anita Bhasin in this call to action to provide younger people with more access to immersive and experiential learning opportunities.

Matthew Farmer's insight:

If all of our futures depend upon the next generation's capability to navigate this highly complex world, how can we give them the tools to succeed?

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Learning 'culture' from an anthropologist | Bethany Taylor

Learning 'culture' from an anthropologist | Bethany Taylor | Experiential Learning | Scoop.it

This post looks into what the definition of learning 'culture' is from an anthropologist's perspective and how you can apply this to make your learning programs stronger.

Matthew Farmer's insight:

My good friend and colleague, Kenneth Mikkelsen often refers to himself as 'living in many worlds'.  Having multiple specialities brings new ideas to diverse fields of thinking and ultimately supports learning.

 

This great blog post from Bethany Taylor is a great examples of what happens when you move from one field of study to another.  As anthropologist turned instructional designer she is able to bring some interesting perspective to the concept of learning culture.

 

Matthew Farmer

Emerging World

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Moving Beyond Event-based Learning

Moving Beyond Event-based Learning | Experiential Learning | Scoop.it

The authors of this article ask', "Are we stuck in a rut? An event-based eLearning mindset? A “default to PowerPoint” design paradigm?"

 

They argue, "the single-eLearning-course approach has helped solidify an event-based learning mindset. Event-based learning generally assumes that you hit me once with your content and then I’ve got it and am ready to go forth into the world.

 

The reality is people need to go out and try things a few times, mess up, get feedback (if possible), and go back to the books even before they get back on the horse and try again. Building this type of structure and scaffolding into a training program moves you out of an event mindset and more into an apprenticeship model—where you’re taking people on a journey through your content—from novice to mastery.

 

This article offers a real-life example of doing exactly that.

Matthew Farmer's insight:

Advances in technology should enable us to enhance experiential learning rather than replace it.  This case study is great example of making this happen.

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Training Culture vs. Learning Culture

Training Culture vs. Learning Culture | Experiential Learning | Scoop.it

What’s the difference between a “training culture” and a “learning culture”? The answer is, “A great deal.”

 

As the chart shows, in a training culture, responsibility for employee learning resides with instructors and training managers. In that kind of culture the assumption is that trainers (under the direction of a CLO) drive learning. Whereas in a learning culture, responsibility for learning resides with each employee and each team. In that kind of culture, employees are expected to seek out the knowledge and skills they need, when and where that knowledge and those skills are needed.

 

In a training culture, the assumption is that the most important learning happens in events, such as workshops, courses, elearning programs, and conferences.
 
In a learning culture, it’s assumed that learning happens all the time, at events but also on-the-job, through coaches and mentors, from action-learning, from smartphones and tablets, socially, and from experiments.
Matthew Farmer's insight:

I'm currently interested in better understanding how to move organizations away from an event-based learning culture to one where learners take more responsibility for applying learning within their work on an ongoing basis.  

 

This article suggests that a good way to view this is as a distinction between a 'training culture' and a 'learning culture' and I quite like the simplicity of the drawing.  I'm interested to hear experiences of what approaches actually work in establishing a learning culture.  All experiences welcome...

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Turn Up the Heat on Leadership Development

Turn Up the Heat on Leadership Development | Experiential Learning | Scoop.it

In this article on Chief Learning Officer, Anita Bhasin lays out the argument for why experiential learning programs in emerging markets are becoming an important leadership tool for companies. -"Making the shift from manager to business leader usually means taking an increasingly external perspective, a longer-term view, and often zooming out from a business focus to how the business fits into the community.

 

Lots of managers in development struggle with these passages, but adult development literature shows that this transition doesn’t necessarily mean adding skills. It means making a shift in mindset to expand ways of thinking. Corporate international service learning, or CISL, programs are becoming a popular and strategic tool to address this need while delivering value for the corporation — and for global society — by creating positive social impacts in the emerging world."

Emerging World's insight:

International rotational assignments were once the main way in which large global companies developed global leadership skills among talented employees, but  many companies are now reconsidering their approach.

 

Some companies such as thos highlighted in this article (Cargill, GSK, Microsoft and EY) are developing new immersive approaches to global leadership development that not only provide similar kinds of impactful learning to participants but also expose participants to the complex stakeholder relationships and broader issues that tomorrow’s global executives need to if they are to be successful.

 

Emerging World

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When Turning Points Become Touchpoints

When Turning Points Become Touchpoints | Experiential Learning | Scoop.it

Every major challenge we face, every adversity we bump into, comes with a decision—a fork in the road. These turning points, the moments when we decide which way we will go, can become touchpoints in our lives.

Becky Willmoth's insight:

In this blog piece, Lolly Daskal outlines how it is often the most challenging experiences in our lives that shape who we are both professionally and personally. Lolly’s recommendations to deepen the impact of such experiences really resonate with what we hear from individuals who complete an immersive leadership development experience. Both anecdotal accounts and cross-company research demonstrates how truly transformational learning can result from experiential challenges, creating profound and lasting change.

 

Emerging World

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Experiential Learning is Key to Developing Responsible Leaders

Experiential Learning is Key to Developing Responsible Leaders | Experiential Learning | Scoop.it

Ashridge recently published a study in which senior business leaders were interviewed to understand what kinds of experiences had shaped their leadership practices.  The particular focus was on responsible leadership, which has been gaining much more attention in recent years.

 

Through the interviews, several key themes repeatedly emerged as having been influential in the development of senior leaders' responsible leadership behaviour: 

 

  • First-hand experiences of pressing social challenges, relationships with people experiencing them and with the people and organisations working effectively to help address them.
  • Early career experience in organisations with a strongly-held culture and values of responsible and sustainable business.
  • Exposure to senior leaders with a passion for this kind of business leadership who act as role-models or mentors.
  • Support to reflect on and make sense of these kinds of experiences and how to act on them in business leadership roles.

 

The participants in this research had all taken part in Business in the Community's Seeiing is Believing program - an initiative in which senior leaders learn first-hand about issues such as alcoholism, homelessness, ex-offenders, youth unemployment and the low carbon economy by going out as a group and meeting people who are affected by these issues, subsequently reflecng on the experience and then reporting on the experience and what it means to the Prince of Wales.

Emerging World's insight:

The report highlights how important these immersive kinds of engagement are for the development of responsible leadership, responsible organizations and a responsible and healthy society.

 

The combination of a high-impact emotionally-engaging experience with people from very different backgrounds combined with elevated sensemaking  provided by the visit's facilitators and leaders is very powerful.

 

Matthew

Emerging World

 

Join the Emerging World Webinar to learn more about immersive models for developing global leadership capability

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ismokuhanen's curator insight, March 27, 2016 4:33 PM

Real world training always has impact. What does your organisation do here?

Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, April 1, 2016 5:10 AM

Real world training always has impact. What does your organisation do here?

Antonio Ormachea's curator insight, April 4, 2016 4:45 PM

Real world training always has impact. What does your organisation do here?

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Practice and the Development of Expertise: Part 3

Practice and the Development of Expertise: Part 3 | Experiential Learning | Scoop.it

In the modern workplace jobs are more complex and demand greater cognitive skill.  This challenges us to consider how we can better support the full novice to expert journey, embed learning and practice in the job, design experience to include practice and reflection, build tacit knowledge, and design rich feedback. Fortunately, we have a number of approaches available to us that align well to the conditions of deliberate practice.

Becky Willmoth's insight:

In this final blog on Practice and the Development of Expertise, author Tom Gram discusses some examples of non-formal or informal learning methods that support the development of expertise. The list includes two methods we use regularly, stretching assignments with coaching and action learning, as well as a number of other interesting suggestions.


What all the methods share is a foundation in real experience. Even suggestions such as games or simulations are only advocated if they incorporate real work tasks, rather than abstract case studies. From our experience, it is the ability to test new ideas and approaches within an authentic environment that enables learners to transform their professional performance.

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Practice and the Development of Expertise: Part 1

Practice and the Development of Expertise: Part 1 | Experiential Learning | Scoop.it

We all know well-designed practice is a critical for effective training.  It’s what differentiates meaningful learning from passive information presentation.  But as work becomes more complex and knowledge-based, are the practice activities we design for our formal learning programs (both classroom and e-learning) enough to meet the need for expertise in the modern workplace? A comprehensive body of research on how professional expertise is developed suggests it may not be.

Becky Willmoth's insight:

This is the first in a three-part blog series on Practice and the Development of Expertise. In part one, author, Tom Gram, outlines how top performing individuals at work, besides being very good at what they do, consistently demonstrate enhanced abilities compared to novices and lower performing individuals. The development of these enhanced abilities, he argues requires more intensive and “deliberate” practice than previously thought. The research he summarises navigates us away from event based formal learning to approaches that could be categorized as informal learning or learning from experience. 

 

The expertise developed by informal, or experiential learning, as described in this article certainly align with the requirements of our increasingly complex and interconnected world. Abilities such as pattern perception, using personal networks more effectively, better self-monitoring all support the agility leaders need to succeed in our ever fluctuating buiness landscape.

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Growth Mindset: Clearing up Some Common Confusions

Growth Mindset: Clearing up Some Common Confusions | Experiential Learning | Scoop.it

Carol Dweck's work has made growth mindset a hotly discussed topic in education. It has also spawned misunderstandings about growth mindset and what it means in education.


A growth mindset is the understanding that personal qualities and abilities can change. It leads people to take on challenges, persevere in the face of setbacks, and become more effective learners. As more and more people learn about the growth mindset, which was first discovered by Stanford Professor Carol Dweck, confusions can occur and recently some critiques have emerged.


Of course believers in a growth mindset will invite critical analysis and feedback, as it helps us learn and improve, but some of the recent commentary seems to point to misunderstandings of growth mindset research and practice. This article summarizes some common confusions and offers some reflections



Via Kenneth Mikkelsen
Emerging World's insight:

Research has shown that developing a growth mindset is beneficial in a variety of contexts, from education to the workplace to interpersonal relationships to sports to health. It leads people to take on challenges they can learn from, to find more effective ways to improve, to persevere in the face of setbacks, and to make greater progress, all of which we need to further cultivate in education. 

 

Emerging World

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Kenneth Mikkelsen's curator insight, November 16, 2015 11:21 AM

A growth mindset is the understanding that personal qualities and abilities can change. It leads people to take on challenges, persevere in the face of setbacks, and become more effective learners. As more and more people learn about the growth mindset, which was first discovered by Stanford Professor Carol Dweck, we sometimes observe some confusions about it.


This article summarizes some common confusions and offers some reflections.


RebeccaMoore's curator insight, November 18, 2015 8:15 PM

Mind Shift shares misconceptions associated with the term "growth mindset" and shares ideas to change our own thinking and that of our students. Practical advise on how to move forward using a growth mindset helps readers to put into practice the clear explanations. 

Tony Vengrove's curator insight, February 24, 2016 11:03 PM

I think it's safe to say innovation requires a growth vs. fixed mindset. This article highlights some common misconceptions of the growth mindset.

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Service Learning and Empathy

Service Learning and Empathy | Experiential Learning | Scoop.it

http://roserbatlle.net/wp-content/uploads/2012/08/service-learning-and-empathy2.pdf


Ashoka Fellow, Roser Battle reference many studies that show how service-learning practices improve empathy on students:

  • Students who engaged in service-learning showed greater empathy and cognitive complexity than comparison groups (Courneya, 1994). 
  • Students who engaged in quality service-learning programs reported greater acceptance of cultural diversity (Melchior, 1999; Berkas, 1997
  • Middle and elementary school students who participated in servicelearning were better able to trust and be trusted by others, be reliable and accept responsibility (Stephens, 1995).
  • College Students involved in the service-learning assignment were significantly more likely to express empathy in their reflective writing than the students who did not participate in service-learning. (Wilson 2011).
  • Various characteristics of community service-learning are significantly related to empathy levels in elementary school children. (Emerson, 2008)
  •  A study examined if a service learning method was accomplishing its potential in six categories of service-learning objectives: intellectual, skills, affective development, moral and spiritual growth, community outcomes, and college or university outcomes. Results of an initial reading of the narrative evaluations yielded five themes: connecting with learning; student personal issues; empathy and relating to others; changes in outlook; and program feedback. (Soukup, 1999) 

Via Edwin Rutsch
Matthew Farmer's insight:

Learning through service to others is a powerful experience and builds valuable qualities in people. This collection of references from Roser Battle shows how Service Learning experiences within young people build empathy and understanding - surely great human characteristics that we want to see more of in the world.


If we place these kinds of experiences in a global and corporate context, we get Corporate International Service Learning (CISL).  CISL experiences leverage the work-based skills of employees to address social challenges.  They may be driven by leadership development requirements, community investment or market development needs. And a new study shows that they build the competencies required to be a successful global leader, increase motivation and career mobility. If we combine these strong positive business impacts with the increased empathy that these experiences provide (as referenced in this paper), we have a powerful and sustainable tool for creating enduring, positive change in the world.

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Area of study based on ‘Myers-Briggs’ personality type

Area of study based on ‘Myers-Briggs’ personality type | Experiential Learning | Scoop.it

This infographic from Sam Wisneski suggests what careers students with certain Myers-Briggs type indicator results might be drawn to.

Matthew Farmer's insight:

MBTI is probably the most well known and well-used personality profiling framework in the business world.  This great infographic captures the 16 different personality types in an imaginative and colourful way.  But do you agree with the profile descriptors (champion. healer, inventor etc)?  And do they describe you?

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Confounded by the Unknown: Without a Paddle

Confounded by the Unknown: Without a Paddle | Experiential Learning | Scoop.it

Our frames of knowledge are limited: our frames of experience even more so: sometimes we do things and learn from them (experience into knowledge) and sometimes we learn things and then do them, either now or later (knowledge into experience, or banked knowledge ready for the time). But somethings are just unknown: outside our knowledge and experience, outside, indeed, of any frame we have to understand them.

Becky Willmoth's insight:

Within this blog Julian Stodd advocates learning approaches that expose the individual to knowledge and experience outside their existing frames thereby changing their perspective. This type of learning provides a resource for innovation that fosters the agility needed in increasingly complex and ambiguous times.    

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