Immunology and Biotherapies
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Rheuminations: Infection or RA Flare? - MedPage Today

Rheuminations: Infection or RA Flare? - MedPage Today | Immunology and Biotherapies | Scoop.it
Rheuminations: Infection or RA Flare? MedPage Today "Transplant immunology is complex, and as our arsenal of highly specific immunosuppressant and immunomodulating medications integrated into clinical practice increases, the occurrence of unusual...
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Immunology and Biotherapies
Page Ressources et Actualités du DIU immunologie et biothérapies
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Resources for DIU Immunologie et Biothérapies

DIU Immunologie et Biotherapies is a french diploma associating many french universities and immunology laboratories. It is dedicated to the involvement of immunology in new biotherapies, either molecular or cellular

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We choose Scoop.it as preferred curation tool to collect, select, comment informations flowing on the web in this rapidly evolving theme to keep teachers abreast of scientific knowledge and help students surf the wave...

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If you are interested

in Immunology also use http://www.scoop.it/t/immunology

in Mucosal Immunity http://www.scoop.it/t/mucosal-immunity

in Flow Cytometry and Cytomics http://www.scoop.it/t/from-flow-cytometry-to-cytomics

in Allergy an Clinical Immunology http://www.scoop.it/t/allergy-and-clinical-immunology

in Autoimmunity http://www.scoop.it/t/autoimmunity

 

For further informantions on Immune monitoring of Immune therapies, go to

http://www.scoop.it/t/immune-monitoring-1

by MdC

 

Looking for cancer applications inside this topic, use

http://www.scoop.it/t/immunology-and-biotherapies?q=cancer

 

Looking for cytokines and chemokines, use

http://www.scoop.it/t/cytokines-et-chimiokines

 

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The Network effect: promoting collaborative research | British Society for Immunology

The Network effect: promoting collaborative research | British Society for Immunology | Immunology and Biotherapies | Scoop.it
In this article from the November issue of Immunology News, Martin Broadstock from the MRC discusses the rationale behind their new Vaccine Networks and what they hope to achieve through this new initiative.
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Rheumatoid arthritis: Do TNF inhibitors influence lymphoma development?

Rheumatoid arthritis: Do TNF inhibitors influence lymphoma development? | Immunology and Biotherapies | Scoop.it
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Frontiers | Factors Affecting the FcRn-Mediated Transplacental Transfer of Antibodies and Implications for Vaccination in Pregnancy | Immunology

Frontiers | Factors Affecting the FcRn-Mediated Transplacental Transfer of Antibodies and Implications for Vaccination in Pregnancy | Immunology | Immunology and Biotherapies | Scoop.it
At birth, neonates are particularly vulnerable to infection and trans-placental transfer of immunoglobulin G (IgG) from mother to fetus provides crucial protection in the first weeks of life. Transcytosis of IgG occurs via binding with the neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn) in the placental synctiotrophoblast. As maternal vaccination becomes an increasingly important strategy for the protection of young infants, improving our understanding of transplacental transfer and the factors that may affect this will become increasingly important, especially in low-income countries where the burden of morbidity and mortality is highest. This review highlights factors of relevance to maternal vaccination that may modulate placental transfer - IgG subclass, glycosylation of antibody, total maternal IgG concentration, maternal disease, infant gestational age and birthweight - and outlines the conflicting evidence and questions that remain regarding the complexities of these relationships. Furthermore, the intricacies of the Ab-FcRn interaction remain poorly understood and models that may help address future research questions are described.
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Mass. General study finds potential mechanism for BCG vaccine reversal of type 1 diabetes

Mass. General study finds potential mechanism for BCG vaccine reversal of type 1 diabetes | Immunology and Biotherapies | Scoop.it
New data from an FDA-approved clinical trial testing the generic vaccine bacillus Calmette-Guérin to reverse advanced type 1 diabetes demonstrate a potential new mechanism by which the BCG vaccine may restore the proper immune response to the insulin-secreting islet cells of the pancreas.

Via Denis Hudrisier
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Denis Hudrisier's curator insight, November 17, 12:47 PM
Apparently new results show BCG could treat type 1 diabetes by inducing regulatory T cells. Curious to understand how it works and how BCG is able to induce paradoxically protective responses in both TB, bladder cancer and diabetes.
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Cancer immunotherapy: The dark side of PD-1 receptor inhibition

Cancer immunotherapy: The dark side of PD-1 receptor inhibition | Immunology and Biotherapies | Scoop.it
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The Nuts and Bolts of Immunoglobulin Treatment for Antibody Deficiency

The Nuts and Bolts of Immunoglobulin Treatment for Antibody Deficiency | Immunology and Biotherapies | Scoop.it
Immunoglobulin therapy is a key element in the management of most patients with primary
immunodeficiency disease. Allergist/immunologists should be familiar with the appropriate
evaluation of candidates for immunoglobulin, the characteristics of immunoglobulin
products, and how to use them to provide the best care to their patients. Available
immunoglobulin products appear to be equally efficacious, but they are not interchangeable.
Minimizing the risk of serious adverse events and controlling minor side effects is
important to ideal patient care.
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A novel cytotherapy device for rapid screening, enriching and combining mesenchymal stem cells into a biomaterial for promoting bone regeneration

A novel cytotherapy device for rapid screening, enriching and combining mesenchymal stem cells into a biomaterial for promoting bone regeneration | Immunology and Biotherapies | Scoop.it
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The FcRn inhibitor rozanolixizumab reduces human serum IgG concentration: A randomized phase 1 study

The FcRn inhibitor rozanolixizumab reduces human serum IgG concentration: A randomized phase 1 study | Immunology and Biotherapies | Scoop.it
Autoimmune diseases mediated by pathogenic IgG can be treated by B cell–depleting therapies or IVIg, but such therapies are costly and not without side effects. IgG is recycled and kept in the circulation partially through the activity of the neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn). Kiessling et al . report the development of a monoclonal antibody to inhibit FcRn, which should lower IgG levels, thereby reducing pathogenic IgG. This antibody was tested for safety and efficacy in nonhuman primates as well as humans. The antibody was well-tolerated and substantially reduced circulating IgG. These promising results warrant further testing in autoimmune individuals.
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Transplantation tolerance: don't forget about the B cells

Transplantation tolerance: don't forget about the B cells | Immunology and Biotherapies | Scoop.it
Establishing a state of transplantation tolerance that leads to indefinite graft survival without the need for lifelong immunosuppression has been achieved successfully in limited numbers o
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Towards an evidence based approach for the development of adjuvanted vaccines - ScienceDirect

Towards an evidence based approach for the development of adjuvanted vaccines - ScienceDirect | Immunology and Biotherapies | Scoop.it
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Do You Know the 5 Types of Dental Stem Cells? | BioInformant

Do You Know the 5 Types of Dental Stem Cells? | BioInformant | Immunology and Biotherapies | Scoop.it
Dental pulp is the soft living tissue inside a tooth that contains mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs).  The ideal time to harvest dental stem cells is when children lose their deciduous (baby) teeth, either through natural loss or extraction. While MSCs from dental pulp stem cells are only being used only in laboratory settings now, there …
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The Promise and Challenges of CAR-T Gene Therapy

This Medical News article discusses the promise and challenges of CAR-T therapies.
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Precision medicine for urothelial bladder cancer: update on tumour genomics and immunotherapy

Precision medicine for urothelial bladder cancer: update on tumour genomics and immunotherapy | Immunology and Biotherapies | Scoop.it
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Geographic clonal tracking in macaques provides insights into HSPC migration and differentiation

Geographic clonal tracking in macaques provides insights into HSPC migration and differentiation | Immunology and Biotherapies | Scoop.it
The geographic distribution of hematopoiesis at a clonal level is of interest in understanding how hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) and their progeny interact with bone marrow (BM) niches during regeneration. We tagged rhesus macaque autologous HSPCs with genetic barcodes, allowing clonal tracking over time and space after transplantation. We found marked geographic segregation of CD34+ HSPCs for at least 6 mo posttransplantation, followed by very gradual clonal mixing at different BM sites over subsequent months to years. Clonal mapping was used to document local production of granulocytes, monocytes, B cells, and CD56+ natural killer (NK) cells. In contrast, CD16+CD56− NK cells were not produced in the BM, and in fact were clonally distinct from multipotent progenitors producing all other lineages. Most surprisingly, we documented local BM production of CD3+ T cells early after transplantation, using both clonal mapping and intravascular versus tissue-resident T cell staining, suggesting a thymus-independent T cell developmental pathway operating during BM regeneration, perhaps before thymic recovery.
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Cyclin D–CDK4 kinase destabilizes PD-L1 via Cul3SPOP to control cancer immune surveillance

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Oral Glucocorticoid–Sparing Effect of Benralizumab in Severe Asthma (free full text from 2017 NEJM)

Oral Glucocorticoid–Sparing Effect of Benralizumab in Severe Asthma (free full text from 2017 NEJM) | Immunology and Biotherapies | Scoop.it
Many patients with severe asthma rely on oral glucocorticoids to manage their disease. We investigated whether benralizumab,
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The first decade of advanced cell therapy clinical trials using perinatal cells (2005–2015) | Regenerative Medicine

The first decade of advanced cell therapy clinical trials using perinatal cells (2005–2015) | Regenerative Medicine | Immunology and Biotherapies | Scoop.it
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A novel neutralizing human monoclonal antibody broadly abrogates hepatitis C virus infection in vitro and in vivo

Highlights • Development of a novel human monoclonal antibody (mAb), designated 2A5, that targets the HCV envelope glycoprotein E2. • mAb 2A5 efficiently neutralizes HCVpp and HCVcc in a pan-genotypic manner. • mAb 2A5 protects human-liver chimeric mice from HCV challenge.
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Researchers Build a Cancer Immunotherapy Without Immune Cells

A team has engineered two stem cell lines into “synthetic T cells” that destroy breast cancer cells in vitro. 
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Paving the Path toward Porcine Organs for Transplantation — NEJM

Paving the Path toward Porcine Organs for Transplantation — NEJM | Immunology and Biotherapies | Scoop.it
Clinical Implications of Basic Research from The New England Journal of Medicine — Paving the Path toward Porcine Organs for Transplantation
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Respiratory Infections and Antibiotic Usage in Common Variable Immunodeficiency

Respiratory Infections and Antibiotic Usage in Common Variable Immunodeficiency | Immunology and Biotherapies | Scoop.it
Patients with common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) suffer frequent respiratory
tract infections despite immunoglobulin replacement and are prescribed significant
quantities of antibiotics. The clinical and microbiological nature of these exacerbations,
the symptomatic triggers to take antibiotics, and the response to treatment have not
been previously investigated.
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Novartis files CAR-T in Europe in broader use than Gilead rival - Pharmaphorum

Novartis files CAR-T in Europe in broader use than Gilead rival - Pharmaphorum | Immunology and Biotherapies | Scoop.it
Novartis has filed its CAR-T therapy, Kymriah, in Europe in a broader use than its close rival from Gilead. The Swiss pharma filed Kymriah in the EU for children and adults with relapsed or refractory (r/r) acute lymphoblastic leukaemia and adults with r/r diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) who are ineligible for autologous stem cell transplant. Gilead and newly purchased subsidiary Kite got its European filing in first at the end of July – but they are only chasing a use in a DLBCL, a form of non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma. Both CAR-Ts are already approved in the US and are expected to generate several billion dollars in sales at their peaks, but there are already concerns over costs as Kymriah (tisagenlecleucel) will be priced at $475,000 per patient in the US although Novartis offers a rebate if it does not work. Gilead’s therapy undercuts Novartis’ drug at $373,000 per patient, but does not offer a rebate. Chimeric antigen receptor T-cell (CAR-T) therapies are one-off treatments that involve harvesting a patient’s T-cells, and genetically reprogramming them to fight cancer. Trial data so far show they offer a cure – termed a complete response – in some patients, although side effects can be fearsome and must be carefully managed as the immune system goes into overdrive. UK biotech Oxford BioMedica is also closely involved with the Novartis drug – following a deal in July it is sole manufacturer of the lentiviral vectors used to modify the T-cells once harvested. Without giving further details, the company noted it could receive more than $100m from Novartis over the next three years. It will also receive undisclosed royalties from future sales of Novartis CAR-T products under an earlier deal signed in 2014. Novartis’ filing is based on the Novartis-sponsored global, multicentre, phase 2 ELIANA and JULIET trials, which were conducted in collaboration with the University of Pennsylvania, where the therapy was first developed. ELIANA is the first paediatric global CAR-T cell therapy registration trial, examining patients in 25 centers in the US, Canada, Australia, Japan and the EU, including: Austria, Belgium, France, Germany, Italy Norway, and Spain. JULIET is the first multi-center global registration study for CTL019 in adult patients with r/r DLBCL. JULIET is the largest study examining a CAR-T therapy exclusively in DLBCL, enrolling patients from 27 sites in 10 countries across the US, Canada, Australia, Japan and Europe, including: Austria, France, Germany, Italy, Norway and the Netherlands. Data from the six-month primary analysis of JULIET will be presented at the annual meeting of the American Society of Hematology (ASH) next month. Novartis plans additional regulatory submissions for the Kymriah, also known as CTL019, in paediatric and young adult patients with r/r B-cell ALL and adult patients with r/r DLBCL outside the US and EU in 2018.
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What Should Gene Therapy Cost? | DNA Science Blog

What Should Gene Therapy Cost? | DNA Science Blog | Immunology and Biotherapies | Scoop.it
By the time that the FDA’s advisory committee gave a near-instantaneous and unanimous thumbs-up for gene therapy to treat a form of hereditary blindness on October 12, tears were freely flowing. Fittingly, it was World Sight Day. The new drug, Luxturna, is a one-time injection of a working gene into the eye to treat RPE65 mutation–associated retinal dystrophy. When the final stamp of approval arrives in January, Luxturna will be the first gene therapy approved in the US for a single-gene disease. At the FDA meeting, the presentations from ophthalmologists who’d developed Luxturna as well as researchers from sponsoring company Spark Therapeutics were exciting, but the meeting really came to life when those who’d benefited spoke. COUNTING STARS Dozens of people have regained vision by participating in clinical trials that began in England in 2007. Many of the newly-sighted first notice celestial bodies - sun, moon, and stars - as did Katelyn Corey, who spoke at the FDA meeting. She’s a
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CAR-T Cell Therapy for Cancer Treatment – An Insight into Side Effects

CAR-T Cell Therapy for Cancer Treatment – An Insight into Side Effects | Immunology and Biotherapies | Scoop.it
T-Cells are a part of our immune system. Made in the thymus gland of our bodies, they are white blood cells which constantly clean our system by hunting and attacking any abnormal cells or substances. Recently, in August 2017, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved a genetically engineered T cell therapy called – [...]

Via Krishan Maggon
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efficiency always has side effects
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