Immigration and U.S. law
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Immigration and U.S. law
Impact of U.S. laws on immigrants, legal and illegal
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Why 'illegal immigrant' is a slur - CNN.com

Why 'illegal immigrant' is a slur - CNN.com | Immigration and U.S. law | Scoop.it
The term "illegal immigrant" is inaccurate and biased, and may even increase hate crimes against Latinos, says Charles Garcia...
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Joaquin Luna Family Responds to President Obama's DREAM Act Relief

Joaquin Luna Family Responds to President Obama's DREAM Act Relief | Immigration and U.S. law | Scoop.it

Approximately one year after the failed DREAM Act vote, the Latino/Mexican community was dealt a heavy blow when Joaquin Luna, an undocumented teen DREAM Act student took his own life. I only wish that he would have waited 7 more months.

Approximately one year after the failed DREAM Act vote in December 2010, the Latino / Mexican community was dealt a heavy blow when we learned of the tragic news regarding the passing of Joaquin Luna -- an undocumented teen DREAM Act student who took his own life. He felt he had no hope and nowhere to turn to. We wrote about the tragic story of Joaquin Luna here and here.

As a result of that, the Tequila Party Movement (counter movement to the Tea Party Movement) made a commitment to the Joaquin Luna family we would do everything in our power to not let his memory go in vain. On November 29, 2011, the National Tequila Party Movement asked for United States Senators to pass the DREAM Act before they went on their holiday or Christmas vacation breaks. We were happy to hear news that Senator Dick Durbin took a leadership role with regard to the DREAM Act in memory of Joaquin Luna, the Texas undocumented teenager who felt he had no other option with the current broken immigration system.  We also wrote Republican Speaker of the House John Boehner a letter to no avail and he did not answer our inquiries when we requested support for an emergency DREAM Act in an effort to quash future teen DREAMer suicides.

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Speaker Boehner said what about immigration? You're kidding

Speaker Boehner said what about immigration?  You're kidding | Immigration and U.S. law | Scoop.it

Remember Art Linkletter and “Kids Say the Darndest Things”?

By Paul WhitefieldJune 19, 2012, 7:01 p.m.

Remember Art Linkletter and “Kids Say the Darndest Things”?

Well, it may be time for an updated version called “Politicians Say the Darndest Things.”

Reacting to President Obama’s move last week to defer deportations of some young illegal immigrants, House Speaker John A. Boehner (R-Ohio) said Tuesday:

“The president's announcement on immigration is -- it puts everyone in a difficult position. I think we all have concerns for those who are caught in this trap, who through no fault of their own are here. But the president's actions are going to make it much more difficult for us to work in a bipartisan way to get to a permanent solution.”

 

Uh, Earth to Mr. Speaker: It’s not the other party that’s drawn a line in the sand on this issue. Democrats have been pushing the Dream Act -- you know, the legislation that would address the concerns “we all have” for “those who are caught in this trap”?

 

Want to know who’s making it “much more difficult for us to work in a bipartisan way to get to a permanent solution”? You might want to check out Arizona Rep. Ben Quayle (yes, he’s a Republican), who has introduced the Prohibiting Back-door Amnesty Act of 2012 to block the president’s action.

Catchy name, isn’t it? A real positive, nonjudgmental, bipartisan-sounding title, wouldn’t you say?

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Why Honor Students Across The Country Are Being Thrown In Jail

Why Honor Students Across The Country Are Being Thrown In Jail | Immigration and U.S. law | Scoop.it
Can you imagine going through something like this when you were in high school?
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Who Are the Eligible DREAMers? A Demographic Profile

Who Are the Eligible DREAMers? A Demographic Profile | Immigration and U.S. law | Scoop.it

Less than a week ago, President Obama announced a policy change that could affect as many as 1.4 million young undocumented students living in the United States by halting their deportation proceedings and granting them temporary work permits.

by Cristina Costantini 

Less than a week ago, President Obama announced a policy change that could affect as many as 1.4 million young undocumented students living in the United States by halting their deportation proceedings and granting them temporary work permits. However, figuring out who is eligible under Obama's new policy, and how many of them exist, has been no easy task.

Pew Hispanic Center associate director Mark Hugo Lopez explained that measuring an undocumented population is inherently challenging and estimates can therefore vary widely.

"There are no surveys which ask people, 'Are you here in the country illegally or not?' And if there were, I'm not sure how reliable responses would be. So we have to rely on a number of different existing sources," Lopez told The Huffington Post.

Obama's directive will reportedly affect  many of those undocumented immigrants -- often termed DREAMers -- who would have benefitted under a decade-old bill called the Dream Act, last struck down in 2010. The new policy includes those living in the country under the age of 31 who came to the U.S. as children; who don't have a criminal record; and who have served in the military, or are currently attending, or have graduated from, high school or college.

 

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Asian arrival: How STEM demand led to a massive shift in immigration

Asian arrival: How STEM demand led to a massive shift in immigration | Immigration and U.S. law | Scoop.it

An immigration attorney explains why Asians have surpassed Latinos as the largest group of newcomers to the United States.

 

 By Michael Wildes, Published: June 21 | Updated: Friday, June 22, 7:30 AMThe Washington Post

The Pew Research Center’s recent study concluding that the number of Asian immigrants moving to the United States now exceeds the number of Latinos hardly seems surprising to me or many of my fellow immigration attorneys. My law firm, Wildes & Weinberg P.C., which has focused exclusively on United States immigration matters for more than 50 years, has seen a dramatic uptick in the number of our clients who are of Asian origin in the last several years, many of them of Indian, Bangladeshi, and Chinese descent.

And of those, many, if not the majority, are highly skilled workers who meet the qualifications for H-1B professional nonimmigrant visas.

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Hey Kid, Wanna Buy A Democracy?

Hey Kid, Wanna Buy A Democracy? | Immigration and U.S. law | Scoop.it

Bill Moyer at his best on SuperPACS.

 

How much election will $100,000 get me?...

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Joy, criticism greet immigration policy move - CNN.com

Joy, criticism greet immigration policy move - CNN.com | Immigration and U.S. law | Scoop.it
By Mariano Castillo, CNN updated 1:19 PM EDT, Sat June 16, 2012  

The news that the Obama administration is shifting its immigration policy for undocumented youth elicited a joyous reaction from them.

 

 Jose Luis Zelaya shed tears of joy Friday morning.

"It's just insane," the graduate student at Texas A&M University said. "I've been working on this for six years. It is just overwhelming."

Zelaya was electrified by news that the Obama administration will stop deporting illegal immigrants who entered the United States as children if they meet certain requirements.

Zelaya came to the United States illegally from Honduras at age 14 to find his mother, who was already in the country, he said.

  Napolitano: Congress needs to act

  18-year-old fights to stay in U.S.

Without the change announced Friday, he couldn't get a job to help pay for school; Zelaya, 25, is pursuing a master's degree in education with hopes of earning a doctorate and teaching middle school. He also wouldn't be able to consider job offers that presented themselves afterward. The uncertainty over what loomed after graduation spooked him.

"Now, maybe I will be able to work without being afraid that someone may deport me," he said. "There is no fear anymore."

Immigration shift sparks reaction from both sides

News of the change raced across the country, buoying the spirits of immigrants and immigrant advocates who have campaigned for such a change for more than 10 years.

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