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Transformational Storytelling: The Real “State of Power” is Culture

Transformational Storytelling: The Real “State of Power” is Culture | immersive media | Scoop.it
A growing number of people have been connecting the dots across issues ranging from political corruption and biased corporate media to anti-science propaganda promoted by the fossil fuel industry and…

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Dr. Karen Dietz's curator insight, February 22, 5:31 PM

Part of my Transformational Storytelling System for businesses and leaders focuses on the ability to use storytelling to transform yourself, your company, your community -- or bigger systems like the world.

 

In order to be effective in transforming culture/community/world, awareness needs to be built around the narratives regarding business, economics, debt, power, etc. that we are all immersed in.

 

Here's a blog post that really starts talking about these narratives, offers ideas for creating shifts, and an approach to use. It's just an overview, but there are links to follow and explore more.

 

Want to make a bigger impact and leave a lasting legacy? Then dig into this article. Just be prepared to confront the uncomfortable...

 

This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it. Follow her on Twitter @kdietz

jessica benton's curator insight, February 23, 2:52 PM
This relates to what we have discussed in class about culture because it mentions that the people are separated into different categories that are set by wealth and also by what the believe. I believe this article is very insightful about what the true meaning of proverty being reduced was just a fix. It is set at a superficial level. Also it talks about how it will have a "design science" for social change which i find very intriguing.
Hunter Reynolds's curator insight, February 27, 4:38 PM
We are all a part in our culture and this really relates to our chapter. I thought that this article had a good message that we are a part in our culture. This is an obvious thought but a true one. We can make changes if we work hard enough. This relates to our unit because we are learning about different cultures and everyone there is a part of it.
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Virtual Reality Audiences — The Storytelling Guide

The Storyteller's Guide to the Virtual Reality Audience - Stanford d.school - Medium
As VR storytellers, we are charged with molding experience itself into story, and none of our storytelling tools have pr…

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Dr. Karen Dietz's curator insight, April 12, 2016 4:55 PM

Virtual Reality (VR) storytelling is a hot topic today, and this article talks about the latest research in immersive storytelling.

 

It's one thing to use VR at IKEA or Lowe's home improvement stores to test out furniture and designs. It's quite another to share a story in VR. This post shares insights gained from recent research about what works and what doesn't in VR storytelling.

 

Stuff like:

  1. What is the audience's role in VR? It's fascinating what they discover!
  2. How does the position you stand in and the engagement you have in VR impact the effect of the story?
  3. What do visual constraits have on the story experience?

 

VR is a medium that truly changes storytelling. There are lots of opportunities and lots of pitfalls/dangers. Read this article to keep up to date on this trend.

 

This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it. Follow her on Twitter @kdietz

Janet Vasil's curator insight, April 15, 2016 7:48 AM
Excellent research into VR storytelling.
Minna Kilpeläinen's curator insight, April 15, 2016 4:43 PM
"360° is more than full circle. The more complete the environment, the more it resonates."
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Stories Told at Work: Their Unexpected Influence

Stories Told at Work: Their Unexpected Influence | immersive media | Scoop.it
New research on how ethics are contagious.

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Dr. Karen Dietz's curator insight, September 15, 2015 5:53 PM

Harvard Business Review just came out with this article by Francesca Gina about how stories influence behavior at work -- and the research results organizations experienced. Yahoo!


This is solid documentation that every leader, organizational development specialist, HR director, social change advocate, and story practitioner needs to read.


Links to the research is provided. We've known anecdotally that storytelling provides these benefits, and now research is backing it up.


Enjoy this piece.


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

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Change Curve: The Control Effect [Part 1]

Change Curve: The Control Effect [Part 1] | immersive media | Scoop.it
The Change Curve describes three manifestations of organisational change: 'Resisted', where the organisation deploys antibodies to kill change conversations, 'Constrained', where the organisation i...

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Start With WHERE, Not WHY In Your Stories

Start With WHERE, Not WHY In Your Stories | immersive media | Scoop.it

My business storytelling colleague Paul Andrew Costello shares great wisdom with us as he challenges the popular notion of "start with WHY", so rampant today in business/business storytelling circles. 


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Dr. Karen Dietz's curator insight, May 21, 2015 12:45 PM

Paul, I couldn't agree more. WHY has it's place, but WHERE is much more powerful. I like your approach much better. 

Folks -- check out Paul's post and let's get unstuck from WHY


Click on the link above to read the entire recent thread from Worldwide Story Work group on Facebook. In the post, participant names are hyperlinked so you can check them out.


Here are the opening paragraphs:

START WITH WHERE, NOT WHY

Paul Andrew Costello The new book, all the rage is, "Start With WHY" (Simon Sinek), but Why? dare I ask?

I want to write a book in reply, titled, Don’t start with WHY, start with WHERE. Because Why assumes there is a reason, whereas more times than not, WHY is a SITUATION, not a reason. Why are police in controversy? Why are young men from minorities being targeted? Why is America still so scared of terrorism? Don't formulate some grand theory about racism or class, just go into those streets and meet those people and you understand that a thousand reasons wont do justice to the situation. 

A why question implies that people have the luxury of an answer, as if the world must always conform to cause and effect logic, or that people always have the freedom to have reasons, rather than acting out of necessity. Most human complexities are compounded by answer-denying situations and once you give an answer, its immediately wrong because there is no one answer. 


Go read the blog post for the entire conversation and what people in the biz story world really think about the notion "Start With Why".

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Stories: What Sinks Organizational Change Infographic

Stories: What Sinks Organizational Change Infographic | immersive media | Scoop.it

Some aspects of organizational culture are visible on the surface, like the tip of an iceberg, while others are implicit and submerged within the organization. Because these ingrained assumptions are tacit and below the surface, they are not easy to see or deal with, although they affect everything the organization does.


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Anne Egros's curator insight, May 17, 2015 2:33 PM

What really drives organizations ?

Gudrun Hoehne's curator insight, May 20, 2015 4:49 AM

In global companies sometime the organizational cultures differ according to the subsidiaries. This is also of importance for virtual tems who work acroos different subsidiaries and countries.

Javier Antonio Bellina's curator insight, June 8, 2015 11:07 AM

Lo que hay bajo el Currículum: El Currículum Oculto

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“Talk the Walk”: A Game Changer The Best Storied Leaders Do

“Talk the Walk”: A Game Changer The Best Storied Leaders Do | immersive media | Scoop.it
Why words matter.

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Dr. Karen Dietz's curator insight, August 21, 2014 6:01 PM

I like this article because it goes beyond the simple leadership phrase "Walk the talk," which means "live your values, don't just talk about them".


What the author Bill Taylor is focusing on here is the connection between thinking, language, communication, and action. His position is that when leaders start thinking differently, their language changes, then their communication changes, and then if all goes well, their words and actions line up.


In other words, if leaders can break out of the "isms" of their company, they will start thinking differently about the organization and talk about it differently, too. That can be a game-changer for everyone. Want more innovation? Then start thinking about it differently. That starts the cascade to language, communication, and action.


Taylor has good examples to share, and then asks: "So ask yourself, as you try to lead an organization, or a business unit, or a department: Have you developed a vocabulary of competition that helps everyone understand what makes your company or team special and what it takes for them to be at their best? Can you explain, in a language all your own, what separates you from the pack and why you expect to win?"


All of this languaging and communication happens best through storytelling--which then shapes and inspires action of done well.


While this article is all about using shaping and shifting language internally, the next piece of work is making sure it also connects with customers so you don't end up becoming extinct.


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

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Leading Change in Education | Common Sense School Leadership

Leading Change in Education | Common Sense School Leadership | immersive media | Scoop.it

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Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's curator insight, February 26, 2014 12:05 AM

Teams are still top-down structures. Community is messier and more complex, but can involve many more people. When we open up community, we will hear dissenting voices. So forget guiding coalitions and teams and go for messy and complex.

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The Science Behind Why Great Stories Spread

The Science Behind Why Great Stories Spread | immersive media | Scoop.it
In the second of a two-part series Jonathan Gottschall discusses the unique power stories have to change minds and the key to their effectiveness.

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Dr. Karen Dietz's curator insight, October 21, 2013 12:50 PM

And so the discussion continues. Jonathan Gottschall writes his second blog post in his series about why/how storytelling works so well for businesses (and in general).


He does a good job in laying that foundation.


I have two thoughts for readers as they check out this post:


1. Gottschalk talks about story structure. Of course you have to know story structures to craft a good story. But structure alone won't make you successful IMHO. There's a whole lot more going on in telling a compelling story and structure is only one piece. Ask any creative writer! There are many different formulas. Most biz folks in the US are completely unaware that different groups/cultures have different story structures than what we see broadcasted on the Internet. Which in a global marketplace has huge significance! I'm not anti-story structure -- I just want us to understand its role better.


2. Stories and manipulation. Yes we are being influenced by stories -- and have always been. Yes we are being manipulated all the time. Yes, at some level we know this. No, access to information via the Internet and social media does not innoculate against this. Which is one reason why consumers are getting much more savvy about purchasing from companies who are socially and environmentally conscious.


Gottschalk focuses mostly on ads in this post. Ads are only one type of business storytelling however. He asks questions at the end, "Is storytelling really locked into a master formula?" No. 


Another question he asks is, "Hasn't the digital revolution paved the way for a new kind of storytelling?" and "Is it time for story 2.0?" LOL -- both remain to be seen and I look forward to the next post!


This review was written by Karen Dietz for the Just Story It curation on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

John Michel's curator insight, October 22, 2013 5:36 AM

 When we enter into a story, we enter into an altered mental state--a state of high suggestibility.

Charlie Dare's curator insight, October 22, 2013 7:55 PM

Many songs in particular Country or blues ballards tell a story often of love lost like "Me and Bobby Magee "..."

And so the discussion continues. Jonathan Gottschall writes his second blog post in his series about why/how storytelling works so well for businesses (and in general).

 

He does a good job in laying that foundation.

 

I have two thoughts for readers as they check out this post:

 

1. Gottschalk talks about story structure. Of course you have to know story structures to craft a good story. But structure alone won't make you successful IMHO. There's a whole lot more going on in telling a compelling story and structure is only one piece. Ask any creative writer! There are many different formulas. Most biz folks in the US are completely unaware that different groups/cultures have different story structures than what we see broadcasted on the Internet. Which in a global marketplace has huge significance! I'm not anti-story structure -- I just want us to understand its role better.

 

2. Stories and manipulation. Yes we are being influenced by stories -- and have always been. Yes we are being manipulated all the time. Yes, at some level we know this. No, access to information via the Internet and social media does not innoculate against this. Which is one reason why consumers are getting much more savvy about purchasing from companies who are socially and environmentally conscious.

 

Gottschalk focuses mostly on ads in this post. Ads are only one type of business storytelling however. He asks questions at the end, "Is storytelling really locked into a master formula?" No. 

 

Another question he asks is, "Hasn't the digital revolution paved the way for a new kind of storytelling?" and "Is it time for story 2.0?" LOL -- both remain to be seen and I look forward to the next post!

 

This review was written by Karen Dietz for the Just Story It curation on business storytelling"

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The Power Of Storytelling From John Kotter

The Power Of Storytelling From John Kotter | immersive media | Scoop.it
There’s enough evidence today that the brain is hardwired for stories and by that I mean that they can easily slide into our minds with a bit of emotional punch that keeps them memorable and ‘sticky.’ If the story holds some basic lessons, then they have a chance of staying around over time and modifying what we do: changing actions, reinforcing behaviors, making us do what we do (or need to stop doing) with more confidence.

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Dr. Karen Dietz's curator insight, July 8, 2016 1:00 PM

Here are 2 heavyweights talking about the power of storytelling: its stickiness, fables, Bruno Bettelheim, evolution and storytelling, and how storytelling can generate long lasting effects. 

 

John Kotter is Founder and Chairman of Kotter International and Professor of Leadership, Emeritus at Harvard Business School. In this post he's talking with his friend Michael McCaskey, author, photographer and former President of the Chicago Bears about the power of storytelling in personal and organizational life.

 

I had the privilege of being certified by Kotter himself in his change management system. He's always been deeply involved in stories, using them in his work.

 

This is a nice, easy read -- perfect for a Friday. Enjoy!

 

This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it. Follow her on Twitter @kdietz

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Leadership: It's a Conversation With Storytelling

Leadership: It's a Conversation With Storytelling | immersive media | Scoop.it
How to improve employee engagement and alignment in today’s flatter, more networked organizations

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Dr. Karen Dietz's curator insight, January 19, 2016 12:41 PM

Here is an article fresh from Harvard Business Review (HBR) discussion the most critical part of leadership -- that a leader's effectiveness is not so much about command and control, but about conversations with storytelling.


This is how most of our storytelling in life occurs anyway -- in conversation. There's a continuum of business storytelling that starts on one end with conversational storytelling, which then moves all the way to the other end with performance storytelling at the podium.


What I like about this article is how it pays attention to the dynamics of great conversational storytelling. Like intimacy, trust, listening, interactivity, etc.


As a leader, if you want better results then read this article to understand more about the power of conversations. It's the foundation for making change happen.


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it. Follow her on Twitter @kdietz

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Storytelling For Social Change: NY City Police's Powerful Twist

Storytelling For Social Change: NY City Police's Powerful Twist | immersive media | Scoop.it
As part of efforts to raise public awareness about the risks and dangers of owning guns, a gun control group called States United To Prevent Gun Violence

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Dr. Karen Dietz's curator insight, August 28, 2015 11:53 AM

This is a very powerful video designed to spark change. It takes the lessons from the Significant Objects Project (attach a personal story to an inexpensive garage sale item and purchasers bid to buy it at a 2,000-6,000 price increase) and applies it to social change. This time it's guns.


Whatever you think about gun ownership, this is an amazing example of what happens when people are told the story behind the weapon. It's a brilliant use of storytelling and gives us ideas of other ways to link stories and objects together.


If you are in favor of gun ownership, you are going to hate this video. If you believe gun deaths are a national health crisis, you will love it.


And don't think I'm naive on this topic. I'm no stranger to guns. I grew up in the military, was around weapons all my life, and back in the day won prizes for my marksmanship. I think this video is awesome and hats off to the NY City Police for putting this together.


Thank you to colleague Mary Alice Arthur for posting the French version to Facebook and pointing it out to me.


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

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How To Create The Culture You Want With Stories

How To Create The Culture You Want With Stories | immersive media | Scoop.it
What stories are told in your organization today? Are you aware of them? Do they reinforce your desired culture or do they inspire undesired actions?

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Melanie Hundley's insight:

The author of this article, S. Chris Edmonds, shares a few incredibly important points for leaders sharing stories. The first one is that stories help guide behavior. Tell the wrong stories and you'll be sorry.


On the other hand, if a leader knows the right stories to share, the bottom line increases. Gotta love that. Makes you wonder why more CEOs are paying attention this. And if you are a CEO who does -- yay!


I will also point out that sharing stories is not enough. Rewards and acknowledgement are critical for success. You'll see what I mean when you read the article.


What I also really like in this post are the 2 stories Edmonds shares to make his point. Not only are they good stories, they drive home the advice he brings to the table. Enjoy.


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it ;

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Strategic Leadership Group's curator insight, August 10, 2015 5:43 AM

The author of this article, S. Chris Edmonds, shares a few incredibly important points for leaders sharing stories. The first one is that stories help guide behavior. Tell the wrong stories and you'll be sorry.

 

On the other hand, if a leader knows the right stories to share, the bottom line increases. Gotta love that. Makes you wonder why more CEOs are paying attention this. And if you are a CEO who does -- yay!

 

I will also point out that sharing stories is not enough. Rewards and acknowledgement are critical for success. You'll see what I mean when you read the article.

 

What I also really like in this post are the 2 stories Edmonds shares to make his point. Not only are they good stories, they drive home the advice he brings to the table. Enjoy.

 

This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

Denise Dyer Coaching's curator insight, August 10, 2015 10:06 AM

The author of this article, S. Chris Edmonds, shares a few incredibly important points for leaders sharing stories. The first one is that stories help guide behavior. Tell the wrong stories and you'll be sorry.

 

On the other hand, if a leader knows the right stories to share, the bottom line increases. Gotta love that. Makes you wonder why more CEOs are paying attention this. And if you are a CEO who does -- yay!

 

I will also point out that sharing stories is not enough. Rewards and acknowledgement are critical for success. You'll see what I mean when you read the article.

 

What I also really like in this post are the 2 stories Edmonds shares to make his point. Not only are they good stories, they drive home the advice he brings to the table. Enjoy.

 

This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

Ian Berry's curator insight, August 10, 2015 8:46 PM

Good points about wandering around and engaging and listening. I ask 2 questions What's worth celebrating? What can be better?

Andrew Thorp is a leading expert in how to craft a better story about yourself and your business. I'm having a candid and convivial conversation with him on August 20th You can register from http://www.ianberry.biz/events/

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Storytelling: The Foundation For Change

Storytelling: The Foundation For Change | immersive media | Scoop.it
Personal change is difficult and rare. These 3 strategies help us change even the most intractable habits.

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Dr. Karen Dietz's curator insight, February 10, 2015 10:48 AM

Article LInk: http://www.forbes.com/sites/kathycaprino/2015/02/06/the-3-most-powerful-ways-to-change-people-who-dont-want-to-change/3/


The original title of this article by Kathy Caprino for Forbes Magazine is "The 3 Most Powerful Ways To Change People Who Don't Want To Change". You'd never know that storytelling is the bedrock for all change.


Caprino is interviewing David Maxwell, one of the authors of a favorite book of mine, Influencer. Before social, personal, or structural can be leveraged to make a change, the dominating story needs to be dealt with first. Tips for how to do so are shared.


Go read the article. It makes tons of sense. Want change? Story it first.


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at http://www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

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Data Storytelling: How To Make A Big Difference

Data Storytelling: How To Make A Big Difference | immersive media | Scoop.it
Many people will be familiar with signs by the side of the road exhorting drivers to take their litter away with them. In the past, those signs would remind transgressors of the penalties they faced if caught. Nowadays, they are more likely to feature a statement along the lines of [...]

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Dr. Karen Dietz's curator insight, September 3, 2014 1:29 PM

As I continue to help clients and students integrate data into stories and presentations, I'm finding great truth in the ideas presented in this article.


This post focuses on a specific category of information that when shared can move mountains. The information simply conveys what "other people do."


If you need to influence people in any way, take the advice in this article to heart. The author writes about how to share "what other people do" and gives fab examples to back it up.


Enjoy reading this piece and adding these tips into your data storytelling toolkit.


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

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What's The Problem With TED Storytelling?

What's The Problem With TED Storytelling? | immersive media | Scoop.it
TED is changing the public discourse -- and not all for the better.

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Dr. Karen Dietz's curator insight, July 14, 2014 3:24 PM

Here's an article that makes us question how TED talks have been shaping our business storytelling -- and maybe not in such a good way.


As the author, Nick Morgan, states -- and I agree with him -- TED talks are fabulous. We love TED. TED talks have definitely impacted business presentations for the better.


Yet Morgan makes 2 very important points regarding public speaking and business storytelling:

  1. Shorter personal speeches. What's wrong with that?? Well, as Morgan says, "What’s wrong with shorter speeches is that you can't persuade people to change in 15 minutes, because you can't make them emotionally uncomfortable enough with the status quo to be ready to embrace something new." He continues with some relevant stats.
  2. A story about your personal revelation might not apply to the goal of the speech. There are all kinds of stories to tell, but TED talks seem to tell us that the stories we should share need to be about a personal revelation we've had.


My take-aways from reading this article and the additional insights Morgan has?

  1. If you want people to change, stories need to be longer. Or presentations need to be longer with several different types of stories told.
  2. A springboard story (short anecdote) may get people started, but other story sharing is needed to sustain the effort.
  3. Personal revelation stories might not be the point -- share stories that are not about you.


There's good common sense wisdom in this article that makes us think twice about effective business storytelling. It is definitely worth the read.


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

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Latest Research On Effecitve Biz Story Endings

Latest Research On Effecitve Biz Story Endings | immersive media | Scoop.it
Just another WordPress site

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Dr. Karen Dietz's curator insight, January 7, 2014 3:01 PM

Kendall Haven, author of Story Proof: The Science Behind the Startling Power of Story recently wrote me about his latest research on business story endings.


It's way cool stuff. Bottom line: positive characters and positive endings are not as effective as we thought when desiring to shift behaviors.


Read the brief conversation between myself and Kendall, and then use the latest information to start crafting stories that will act as catalysts for change.


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

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Why MLK Did NOT Say, "I Have A Plan"--Power of Future Story

Why MLK Did NOT Say, "I Have A Plan"--Power of Future Story | immersive media | Scoop.it
When Martin Luther King, Jr. stood on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial fifty years ago and spoke to a great people about their greater future, he didn’t say, “I have a plan.”

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romduck's curator insight, August 28, 2013 8:28 AM

Sharing the VISION means sharing the POINT!

Kati Sipp's curator insight, August 29, 2013 8:29 PM

an excellent point. 

Dr. Karen Dietz's comment, August 29, 2013 9:44 PM
So true romduck! And thanks for your comments Jean-Philippee and Kati.