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Top 75 Educational TechnologyBlogs and Websites | EdTech Blogs

Top 75 Educational TechnologyBlogs and Websites | EdTech Blogs | immersive media | Scoop.it

Educational Technology Blogs Best List. Find information on educational software, instructional technology, history of educational technology, school technology and much more by following Educational Technology Sites.


Via Ken Morrison
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Ken Morrison's curator insight, May 28, 2017 10:09 AM
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Why Anthony Bourdain Is Bullish on the Future of Long-Form Digital Storytelling

Why Anthony Bourdain Is Bullish on the Future of Long-Form Digital Storytelling | immersive media | Scoop.it
Anthony Bourdain, the celebrity chef turned TV show host, believes there's untapped potential with digital media to dive deeper into food and travel stories.  During a South by Southwest Interactive keynote moderated by Nathan Thornburgh, chief editor and publisher at Roads & Kingdoms, Bourdain talked about why he's increasingly in

Via Dr. Karen Dietz
Melanie Hundley's insight:

Hot off the presses from SXSW, Anthony Bourdain talks about the endurance and popularity of long form storytelling. Once again, long form storytelling and its advantages are making the news.

 

Bourdain talks about why he's increasingly interested in finding new ways to tell travel stories through interactive channels, and what viewers are really craving, especially with travel stories.

 

But his points apply to any business, really. Do the deep dive -- tell deeper, longer stories.

 

This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it. Follow her on Twitter @kdietz

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Dr. Karen Dietz's curator insight, March 15, 2016 1:03 PM

Hot off the presses from SXSW, Anthony Bourdain talks about the endurance and popularity of long form storytelling. Once again, long form storytelling and its advantages are making the news.

 

Bourdain talks about why he's increasingly interested in finding new ways to tell travel stories through interactive channels, and what viewers are really craving, especially with travel stories.

 

But his points apply to any business, really. Do the deep dive -- tell deeper, longer stories.

 

This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it. Follow her on Twitter @kdietz

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Fab longform biz story example: How 2 Bored 1970s Housewives Impacted The PC Industry

Fab longform biz story example: How 2 Bored 1970s Housewives Impacted The PC Industry | immersive media | Scoop.it
Vector Graphic became one of the best-known computer manufacturers of its era. It went public. Then the IBM PC changed everything.

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Dr. Karen Dietz's curator insight, July 22, 2015 1:51 PM

Earlier this week I curated a post about the importance of long-form storytelling on the web for businesses. Today I find a terrific example of how this can work.


Written for Fast Company magazine by Benj Edwards @benjedwards, it's a riveting story of how 2 housewives founded and successfully ran Vector Graphics -- and how they changed the computer industry.


There are no bells-and-whistles to this story (flashy video, infographics, or maps) -- just good ol' fashioned storytelling. Which we can all do, regardless of budgets. 


i love how the article positions the women and the birth-and-death of Vector Graphics into the sweeping rock 'em sock 'em history of the early computer days.


There's a lot to learn here. Enjoy the article Who knew Vector Graphics had such an impact?


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her business storytelling curation at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

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The Importance of Longform Storytelling for Your Blogs

The Importance of Longform Storytelling for Your Blogs | immersive media | Scoop.it

In recent months a debate has been brewing around whether shortform or longform content is winning the race for people’s attention. No doubt there are merits to both sides, but there seems to be some confusion abound the subject. 

 

For clarity, longform means articles, white papers and e-books of 2,000 words or more, while shortform refers to content of 500 to 1,000 words.

 

Is there really a difference in their overall performances? Science suggests there is.

 

What the Studies Are Suggesting

 

Many of today’s Internet marketers swear by shortform content, citing a number of independent studies that indicate audience attention spans are falling and as much as 32 percent of users will begin abandoning websites in as little as five seconds if they are slow to load. 

 

This doesn’t speak to the effectiveness of the format in reaching its audience in terms of visibility and findability through search. This is one of the most important advantages that longform content has over its counterpart....


Via Jeff Domansky, Dr. Karen Dietz
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Dr. Karen Dietz's curator insight, July 20, 2015 3:29 PM

Recent studies in the past few weeks are saying that our attention spans are now shorter than a goldfish's. Yikes! It appears we are too stressed and distracted to pay much attention to anything.


But hold your horses -- don't buy into the hype. Turns out long form content (longer stories) are outperforming short posts by a mile.


This is an easy-to-read post that covers other research showing how necessary -- and results producing -- long form content is.


Bottom line: you need a mix of both.  Read the article to find out more. And thanks to fellow curator Jeff Domansky @Jeff Domansky@thePRcoach for finding and sharing this.

Dr. Karen Dietz's comment, July 20, 2015 3:30 PM
Great find Jeff! Thanks for this.
Thorsten Strauss's curator insight, September 24, 2015 7:54 AM

best practice: content length on web site. Long form is important because people get lazy in searching. That is why google prefers sources that give comprehensive answers and leave readers satisfied. 

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Better Storytelling: 7 Ways to Grab Someone’s Attention

Better Storytelling: 7 Ways to Grab Someone’s Attention | immersive media | Scoop.it
It’s your most important currency.

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Dr. Karen Dietz's curator insight, July 7, 2015 5:18 PM

What a nifty post that zeros in on ways to make our storytelling better -- based on science. 


The author, Ben Parr @benparr, the author of Captivology (oooh, nice new word!) shares with us 7 things to focus on if we want to capture someone's attention. Like:

  • Automaticity
  • Rewards
  • Mystery
  • Acknowledgement


Parr explains what he means by each element. After reading the article, ask yourself questions like,

  1. "How can I bring my mystery into my stories?"
  2. "What are ways I can acknowledge people either in my stories, or with my stories?"
  3. "How can I craft my story so a reward is included?"
  4. "What phrase do I want to repeat to have stick in people's minds?"


You'll think of others, too as you read about all 7 elements. This will be fun to do. Get started right away.


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her business storytelling curation at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

Tina Stock's curator insight, July 10, 2015 12:59 AM

From Karen Karr's review


The author, Ben Parr @benparr, the author of Captivology(oooh, nice new word!) shares with us 7 things to focus on if we want to capture someone's attention. Like:

  • Automaticity
  • Rewards
  • Mystery
  • Acknowledgement


Excellent article!

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Storied Characters: How to Increase Your Blog Reader #s

Storied Characters: How to Increase Your Blog Reader #s | immersive media | Scoop.it
Get 100,000 blog readers by creating personas, optimizing your posts, and converting casual readers into dedicated blog subscribers.

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Dr. Karen Dietz's curator insight, May 18, 2015 1:34 PM

This hand dandy free guide from HubSpot (I have no affiliation) is all about storytelling. Their premise (and mine) is that without well developed personas, it will be hard to market effectively and get high numbers of blog readers.


Personas are simply storied characters about who uses your products/services. Do these well, and you will be light years ahead of others.


What I like here is how complete the section is on creating personas. There are clear instructions and 2 pages of questions to help you flesh out your characters.


The rest of the guide focuses on how to optimize and promote your blog post.


Crafting great personas/storied characters will definitely make a difference in your business. And I love that this guide addresses a side of business storytelling that often gets overlooked.


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

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Going Viral: Secrets of Writing Smart, Long Form Storytelling

Going Viral: Secrets of Writing Smart, Long Form Storytelling | immersive media | Scoop.it
Going deep with the founders of Wait But Why, who show that thoughtful, long-form content is king.

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Dr. Karen Dietz's curator insight, March 9, 2015 3:11 PM

What a great article! The data is now in -- long form storytelling goes viral and bucks the myth that we all have the attention spans of a gnat.


What I love about this post is how thorough it is. And thoughtful. Author Michael Grothaus @michaelgrothaus features long-form bloggers Tim Urban and Andrew Finn and their site Wait But Why. Grothaus digs deep into why their blog has been such a run-away success with its long form stories, and what it means. Plus he shares numbers with us:

  1. Average length of their article (3,000 words)
  2. Traffic in 19 months: 31 million unique visitors, 87 million page views, 106,000 newsletter subscribers
  3. Average shares: 300,000 to 600,000 shares per article
  4. Posting frequency: one article/week on average


Gotta love those numbers! Next Grothaus shares Urban and Finn's philosophy about writing such long posts. The he delves into 4 elements that make their posts go viral that you, too, can follow.


May all your business stories bring you numbers like those above!


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it


Marco Favero's curator insight, March 10, 2015 2:55 AM

aggiungi la tua intuizione ...

Lachlan Brown's curator insight, March 11, 2015 6:27 AM

Some excellent advice for creating valuable and quality long form content.  Key takeaways include writing on what you're passionate about, being authentic, working hard, and using images to support the words, not the other way around.

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Crowdsourced School Social Media Policy Now Available | Edudemic

Crowdsourced School Social Media Policy Now Available | Edudemic | immersive media | Scoop.it
I’ve been seeing a lot of people on social media looking for a social media policy and / or an acceptable use policy. So I offered to help spearhead an initiative where some of our amazing readers could help craft these policies from scratch. It started out very basic but, 400 edits later, has materialized into a thoughtful and well-organized document that’s a great template for any school. It may not be perfect for you, but use this as a jumping-off point to get your own policy started.

The School Social Media & Acceptable Use Policy
Social Media
Responsible Use Guidelines
2012-2013

We encourage teachers, students, staff, and other school community members to use social networking/media (Twitter, Facebook, etc.) as a way to connect with others, share educational resources, create and curate educational content, and enhance the classroom experience. While social networking is fun and valuable, there are some risks you should keep in mind when using these tools. In the social media world, the lines are blurred between what is public or private, personal or professional.

We’ve created these social networking/media guidelines for you to follow when representing the school in the virtual world.

Please do the following:

Use good judgment

We expect you to use good judgment in all situations.
You must know and follow the school’s Code of Conduct and Privacy Policy.
Regardless of your privacy settings, assume that all of the information you have shared on your social network is public information.
Be respectful

Always treat others in a respectful, positive and considerate manner.
Be responsible and ethical

Even though you are approved to represent the school, unless you are specifically authorized to speak on behalf of the school as a spokesperson, you should state that the views expressed in your postings, etc. are your own. Stick with discussing school-related matters that are within your area of responsibility.
Be open about your affiliation with the school and the role/position you hold.
Be a good listener

Keep in mind that one of the biggest benefits of social media is that it gives others another way to talk to you, ask questions directly and to share feedback.
Be responsive others when conversing online. Provide answers, thank people for their comments, and ask for further feedback, etc.
Always be doing at least as much listening and responding as you do “talking.”
Don’t share the following:

Confidential information

Do not publish, post or release information that is considered confidential or not public. If it seems confidential, it probably is. Online “conversations” are never private. Do not use your birth date, address, and cell phone number on any public website.
Private and personal information

To ensure your safety, be careful about the type and amount of personal information you provide. Avoid talking about personal schedules or situations.
NEVER give out or transmit personal information of students, parents, or co-workers
Don’t take information you may receive through social networking (such as e-mail addresses, customer names or telephone numbers) and assume it’s the most up-to-date or correct.
Always respect the privacy of the school community members.
Please be cautious with respect to:

Images

Respect brand, trademark, copyright information and/or images of the school (if applicable).
You may use photos and video (products, etc.) that are available on the school’s website.
It is generally not acceptable to post pictures of students without the expressed written consent of their parents.
Do not post pictures of others (co-workers, etc.) without their permission.
Other sites

A significant part of the interaction on blogs, Twitter, Facebook and other social networks involves passing on interesting content or linking to helpful resources. However, the school is ultimately responsible for any content that is shared. Don’t blindly repost a link without looking at the content first.
Pay attention to the security warnings that pop up on your computer before clicking on unfamiliar links. They actually serve a purpose and protect you and the school.
When using Twitter, Facebook and other tools, be sure to follow their printed terms and conditions.
And if you don’t get it right…

Be sure to correct any mistake you make immediately, and make it clear what you’ve done to fix it.
Apologize for the mistake if the situation warrants it.
If it’s a MAJOR mistake (e.g., exposing private information or reporting confidential information), please let someone know immediately so the school can take the proper steps to help minimize the impact it may have.
__________________________________________________________________________

Social Media
Acceptable Use Policy
2012-2013

Introduction
YOURSCHOOLNAME recognizes that access to technology in school gives students and teachers greater opportunities to learn, engage, communicate, and develop skills that will prepare them for work, life, and citizenship. We are committed to helping students develop 21st-century technology and communication skills.

To that end, we provide access to technologies for student and staff use. This Acceptable Use Policy outlines the guidelines and behaviors that users are expected to follow when using school technologies or when using personally-owned devices on the school campus.

The network is intended for educational purposes.
All activity over the network or using district technologies may be monitored and retained.
Access to online content via the network may be restricted in accordance with our policies and federal regulations, such as the Children’s Internet Protection Act (CIPA).
Students are expected to follow the same rules for good behavior and respectful conduct online as offline.
Misuse of school resources can result in disciplinary action.
We make a reasonable effort to ensure students’ safety and security online, but will not be held accountable for any harm or damages that result from misuse of school technologies.
Users of the network or other technologies are expected to alert IT staff immediately of any concerns for safety or security.
Technologies Covered
YOURSCHOOLNAME may provide Internet access, desktop computers, mobile computers or devices, videoconferencing capabilities, online collaboration capabilities, message boards, email, and more.

As new technologies emerge, YOURSCHOOLNAME will attempt to provide access to them. The policies outlined in this document are intended to cover all available technologies, not just those specifically listed.

Usage Policies
All technologies provided by YOURSCHOOLNAME are intended for educational purposes. All users are expected to use good judgment and to follow the specifics of this document as well as the spirit of it: be safe, appropriate, careful and kind; don’t try to get around technological protection measures; use good common sense; and ask if you don’t know.

Web Access
YOURSCHOOLNAME provides its users with access to the Internet, including web sites, resources, content, and online tools. That access will be restricted in compliance with CIPA regulations and school policies. Web browsing may be monitored and web activity records may be retained indefinitely.

Users are expected to respect that the web filter is a safety precaution, and should not try to circumvent it when browsing the Web. If a site is blocked and a user believes it shouldn’t be, the user should follow protocol to alert an IT staff member or submit the site for review.

Email
YOURSCHOOLNAME may provide users with email accounts for the purpose of school-related communication. Availability and use may be restricted based on school policies.

If users are provided with email accounts, they should be used with care. Users should not send personal information; should not attempt to open files or follow links from unknown or untrusted origin; should use appropriate language; and should only communicate with other people as allowed by the district policy or the teacher.

Users are expected to communicate with the same appropriate, safe, mindful, courteous conduct online as offline. Email usage may be monitored and archived.

Social / Web 2.0 / Collaborative Content
Recognizing that collaboration is essential to education, YOURSCHOOLNAME may provide users with access to web sites or tools that allow communication, collaboration, sharing, and messaging among users.

Users are expected to communicate with the same appropriate, safe, mindful, courteous conduct online as offline. Posts, chats, sharing, and messaging may be monitored. Users should be careful not to share personally-identifying information online.

Mobile Devices Policy
YOURSCHOOLNAME may provide users with mobile computers or other devices to promote learning both inside and outside of the classroom. Users should abide by the same acceptable use policies when using school devices off the school network as on the school network.

Users are expected to treat these devices with extreme care and caution; these are expensive devices that the school is entrusting to your care. Users should report any loss, damage, or malfunction to IT staff immediately. Users may be financially accountable for any damage resulting from negligence or misuse.

Use of school-issued mobile devices, including use of the school network, may be monitored.

Personally-Owned Devices
Students may use personally-owned devices (including laptops, tablets, smartphones, and cell phones) at any time during school hours—unless such use interferes with the delivery of instruction by a teacher or staff or creates a disturbance in the educational environment.  Any misuse of personally-owned devices may result in disciplinary action.  Therefore, proper netiquette and adherence to the acceptable use policy should always be used.  In some cases, a separate network may be provided for personally-owned devices.

Security
Users are expected to take reasonable safeguards against the transmission of security threats over the school network. This includes not opening or distributing infected files or programs and not opening files or programs of unknown or untrusted origin. If you believe a computer or mobile device you are using might be infected with a virus, please alert IT. Do not attempt to remove the virus yourself or download any programs to help remove the virus.

Downloads
Users should not download or attempt to download or run .exe programs over the school network or onto school resources without express permission from IT staff. You may be able to download other file types, such as images of videos. For the security of our network, download such files only from reputable sites, and only for educational purposes.

Netiquette

Users should always use the Internet, network resources, and online sites in a courteous and respectful manner.
Users should also recognize that among the valuable content online is unverified, incorrect, or inappropriate content. Users should use trusted sources when conducting research via the Internet.
Users should also remember not to post anything online that they wouldn’t want parents, teachers, or future colleges or employers to see. Once something is online, it’s out there—and can sometimes be shared and spread in ways you never intended.
Plagiarism

Users should not plagiarize (or use as their own, without citing the original creator) content, including words or images, from the Internet.
Users should not take credit for things they didn’t create themselves, or misrepresent themselves as an author or creator of something found online. Research conducted via the Internet should be appropriately cited, giving credit to the original author.
Personal Safety
If you see a message, comment, image, or anything else online that makes you concerned for your personal safety, bring it to the attention of an adult (teacher or staff if you’re at school; parent if you’re using the device at home) immediately.

Users should never share personal information, including phone number, address, social security number, birthday, or financial information, over the Internet without adult permission.
Users should recognize that communicating over the Internet brings anonymity and associated risks, and should carefully safeguard the personal information of themselves and others.
Users should never agree to meet someone they meet online in real life without parental permission.
Cyberbullying
Cyberbullying will not be tolerated. Harassing, dissing, flaming, denigrating, impersonating, outing, tricking, excluding, and cyberstalking are all examples of cyberbullying. Don’t be mean. Don’t send emails or post comments with the intent of scaring, hurting, or intimidating someone else.
Engaging in these behaviors, or any online activities intended to harm (physically or emotionally) another person, will result in severe disciplinary action and loss of privileges. In some cases, cyberbullying can be a crime. Remember that your activities are monitored and retained.

Examples of Acceptable Use
I will:

Use school technologies for school-related activities and research.
Follow the same guidelines for respectful, responsible behavior online that I am expected to follow offline.
Treat school resources carefully, and alert staff if there is any problem with their operation.
Encourage positive, constructive discussion if allowed to use communicative or collaborative technologies.
Alert a teacher or other staff member if I see threatening/bullying, inappropriate, or harmful content (images, messages, posts) online.
Use school technologies at appropriate times, in approved places, for educational pursuits only.
Cite sources when using online sites and resources for research; ensure there is no copyright infringement.
Recognize that use of school technologies is a privilege and treat it as such.
Be cautious to protect the safety of myself and others.
Help to protect the security of school resources.
This is not intended to be an exhaustive list. Users should use their own good judgment when using school technologies.

Examples of Unacceptable Use
I will not:

Use school technologies in a way that could be personally or physically harmful to myself or others.
Search inappropriate images or content.
Engage in cyberbullying, harassment, or disrespectful conduct toward others–staff or students.
Try to find ways to circumvent the school’s safety measures and filtering tools.
Use school technologies to send spam or chain mail.
Plagiarize content I find online.
Post personally-identifying information, about myself or others.
Agree to meet someone I meet online in real life.
Use language online that would be unacceptable in the classroom.
Use school technologies for illegal activities or to pursue information on such activities.
Attempt to hack or access sites, servers, accounts, or content that isn’t intended for my use.
This is not intended to be an exhaustive list. Users should use their own good judgment when using school technologies.

Limitation of Liability
YOURSCHOOLNAME will not be responsible for damage or harm to persons, files, data, or hardware. While YOURSCHOOLNAME employs filtering and other safety and security mechanisms, and attempts to ensure their proper function, it makes no guarantees as to their effectiveness. YOURSCHOOLNAME will not be responsible, financially or otherwise, for unauthorized transactions conducted over the school network.

Violations of this Acceptable Use Policy
Violations of this policy may have disciplinary repercussions, including:

Suspension of network, technology, or computer privileges in extreme cases
Notification to parents in most cases
Detention or suspension from school and school-related activities
Legal action and/or prosecution
I have read and understood this Acceptable Use Policy and agree to abide by it:

__________________________________________
(Student Printed Name)

Via Ken Morrison
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Ken Morrison's curator insight, November 13, 2014 7:51 AM

Does your school have a social media policy for educators and support staff?  If not, here is a nice starter kit.

Other resources on the topic include: 
http://edublogs.org/curriculum-corner-using-a-blog-with-students/#commenting

One school's policy:
http://4kmand4kj.global2.vic.edu.au/guidelinessafety/blog-guidelines/

Northwestern University's policy:
http://www.feinberg.northwestern.edu/communications/brand/social-media/

 

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Fab Storytelling Secrets From 3 TED Talks

Fab Storytelling Secrets From 3 TED Talks | immersive media | Scoop.it

"When I decided to write an article on brand storytelling inspired by TED talks, I went about it all wrong.

 

Scouring YouTube for tactics, elements, and components of brand storytelling, I was aiming to find five or ten (or 17) actionable tips that you can use to tell you brand’s story.

 

I was already boring myself to death and I hadn’t even begun to write.


Via Dr. Karen Dietz
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Ken Schneider's curator insight, July 23, 2014 11:49 AM

Very good POV on story and some interesting TED Talks - especially Nancy Duarte. Worth your time!

Dr. Karen Dietz's curator insight, July 23, 2014 6:37 PM

Fellow curator Gregg Morris discovered this gem for his Story and Narrative curation and I thought you should know about it too.


3 TED talks are featured here and they are all worth watching. The first one from Andrew Stanton on the Clues To A Great Story I've curated before. It's a keeper. 


The second one from JJ Abrams is new for me -- and I love it. It's all about adding mystery into the storytelling toolbox. As the author of this post Julie Newmark says, "For example, creating puzzles to solve, challenges and even small adventures within your brand stories, you are involving customers and inspiring them to use their minds together as they seek to discover more. Engagement and connection to your brand is the point here and using mystery creates the potential for taking it all to a deeper level." Right on!!


And the third video from Nancy Duarte focuses on one of the most powerful dynamics for moving people to action -- before and after pictures.


Have fun with these and incorporate these lessons into your business storytelling.

A.K.Andrew's curator insight, July 27, 2014 12:02 PM

Stories need to be captivating from the beginning or you'll bore the pants of your audience, whether it's fiction or brand storytelling.

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Technique to Create Irresistible Storytelling

Technique to Create Irresistible Storytelling | immersive media | Scoop.it
Learn how to turn readers into buyers with an engaging, audience-first storytelling strategy. Demian Farnworth reveals the creative technique in six steps.

Via Dr. Karen Dietz
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Dr. Karen Dietz's curator insight, July 14, 2014 10:02 AM

Business storytelling can be as simple or complex as you want to make it. This article borders more on the complex side because it talks more about how to use storytelling as an ongoing strategy than a one-off activity.


The article by Demian Farnworth for Copyblogger focuses on creating a content strategy using narrative structure to generate an ongoing brand narrative. But wait! If you are a corporate executive, this idea applies to you too!!


Anyone in business or an executive can take the process outlined here and use it to map the stories you want to tell -- in a way that generates a consistent voice, image, vision, and brand.


What I particularly like is the attention paid to creating a visual storyboard. Storytelling is all about conveying images, not information. So the practice of visual planning and storyboarding here is very valuable.


The only piece that's missing is listening for stories from your audience and incorporating those into your story mix. That builds greater loyalty.


Dig into this article and use the process here to upgrade the quality of your business storytelling.


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

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B2B Case Study 'Stories': Get Beyond Boring Please!

B2B Case Study 'Stories': Get Beyond Boring Please! | immersive media | Scoop.it
B2B case studies that move beyond boring "Situation, Action, Results" formulas and use storytelling will engage readers and buyers.

Via Dr. Karen Dietz
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Dr. Karen Dietz's curator insight, April 24, 2014 10:44 AM

Yes, I agree with my colleague Andrew Nemiccolo, the author of this article -- most business case studies are BORING boring boring.


Good grief -- you'd think by now after all these years of business storytelling work (since late 1990s), we wouldn't find case studies that are not stories. It's sad but true -- we find them aplenty.


Nemiccolo has written a nice piece here about how to get out of the boring case study rut based on a very outmoded structure. He's got a good example of what we typically see. Nemiccolo then poses some questions about the example to turn it into a story.


Get with the program folks! Read this article and re-write  your case studies so you can get more traction. Don't leave business on the table with case studies that will put your readers to sleep.


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

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3 Steps for Turning Bland-land Text Into Sparkling Stories

3 Steps for Turning Bland-land Text Into Sparkling Stories | immersive media | Scoop.it
It may seem difficult to write content that's engaging and seductive, but it doesn't need to be. Here are three steps to turn boring sentences into sparkling content.

Via Dr. Karen Dietz
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Dr. Karen Dietz's curator insight, April 4, 2014 11:15 AM

OK -- this recent post on Copyblogger never mentions storytelling, yet all the points the author makes directly relates to how to craft compelling stories when creating online content.


The article by author Henneke Duistermaat discusses removing 'corporate speak' from your writing, avoiding the passive voice, and to stop not using words that won't connect with your audience.


These are good reminders for all of us -- because it is very easy to fall into these traps.


Happy writing and storytelling!


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

Carolyn Williams's curator insight, April 5, 2014 7:16 AM

Sparkling!

Agi Anderson's curator insight, April 5, 2014 9:31 AM

Truly an exceptional post that offers methods to engage your readers with story telling. If you have an old fashion HTML website, perhaps it's time to kick it up a notch with website a hosted Wordpress platform. The RPVM websites are designed to grab attention! 


To be effective, your website must be dynamic and have the ability to reach your audience. It becomes the conduit to relay information with search and share on social platforms. Take a sec to learn more about RPVM websites  be sure to see the RPVM Sample Sites!

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This site is “taking the edge off rant mode” by making readers pass a quiz before commenting

This site is “taking the edge off rant mode” by making readers pass a quiz before commenting | immersive media | Scoop.it
"If everyone can agree that this is what the article says, then they have a much better basis for commenting on it."

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Ken Morrison's curator insight, March 4, 2017 9:35 PM
Ideas worth spreading.
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Telling Your Story: 5 Ways To Add Compelling Visuals to Your Content

Telling Your Story: 5 Ways To Add Compelling Visuals to Your Content | immersive media | Scoop.it
Do you remember when great content marketing meant your copy was properly optimized for search engines so your customers could find you when searching? Tod

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Dr. Karen Dietz's curator insight, January 12, 2016 5:09 PM

In this post you will find 5 solid ideas and tips for adding visuals to your storytelling and content. Written by Ashley Zeckman, a Director at TopRank Online Marketing, the article includes great examples for each idea/tip. 


We know visual storytelling is becoming even more critical than ever. Visuals increase traffic and shares. And engagement. So if you are looking for new ideas for how to tell your story with more visuals, you will enjoy this post.


Some of these ideas/tips you might not have thought of, which is why I like them. I know you will find at least one -- if not more -- to use in  your business.


Story on!


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it. Follow her on Twitter @kdietz

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Cross-Platform Storytelling: Getting Satisfaction

Cross-Platform Storytelling: Getting Satisfaction | immersive media | Scoop.it

What you already know about story still applies – great characters you want to spend time with, worlds that invite you in, stories building to moments of epiphany, recognition, revelation, catharsis and all that good stuff.

 

But the process of getting there changes from platform to platform. You have to develop narratives the right way for the right platform.


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Dr. Karen Dietz's curator insight, July 20, 2015 3:51 PM

Here's a fab article on sharing your business stories across platforms. Let's face it, we've got a story to share on our website, in brochures, books, whitepapers, blog posts, presentations, SlideShares, video, animated cartoons....the list goes on.


I just had a conversation the other day with a company wanting to share some of their customer stories digitally -- without ever spending time on the story itself. They were just in a rush to the technology, thinking the platform would generate a good story. Big mistake.


One story may not translate well in to all different channels, however -- nor achieve the results you seek. In this post transmedia expert Japhet Asher shares lots of insights about how NOT to lose your story as it morphs across platforms.


There is great wisdom shared -- and some good stories -- that will help you preserve the core of your story, and how to think about moving stories into different media.


Let's get more story wise, so when we share our stories across platforms, great results happen.


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her business storytelling curation at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

Commercial Business's curator insight, August 7, 2015 7:38 PM

Here's a fab article on sharing your business stories across platforms. Let's face it, we've got a story to share on our website, in brochures, books, whitepapers, blog posts, presentations, SlideShares, video, animated cartoons....the list goes on.

 

I just had a conversation the other day with a company wanting to share some of their customer stories digitally -- without ever spending time on the story itself. They were just in a rush to the technology, thinking the platform would generate a good story. Big mistake.

 

One story may not translate well in to all different channels, however -- nor achieve the results you seek. In this post transmedia expert Japhet Asher shares lots of insights about how NOT to lose your story as it morphs across platforms.

 

There is great wisdom shared -- and some good stories -- that will help you preserve the core of your story, and how to think about moving stories into different media.

 

Let's get more story wise, so when we share our stories across platforms, great results happen.

 

This review was written by Karen Dietz for her business storytelling curation at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it ;

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The Hero’s Journey: A Big Problem for Business Storytelling

The Hero’s Journey: A Big Problem for Business Storytelling | immersive media | Scoop.it
The Hero's Journey for business storytelling can be all wrong. It's too epic. Too long. And it assumes your audience cares. Here's what to do instead.

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Dr. Karen Dietz's curator insight, July 10, 2015 12:32 PM

Here in San Diego we are in the midst of Comic-Con and super-heroes abound. I've donned my super-girl costume and am happily immersed in X-men movies. 


And just in the nick of time, my Twitter buddy Os @ICGJ_IDEATION sent me this link to an article written by Maggie Patterson. I jumped up and now with joy, because despite my supergirl powers and love of action heroes, the hero's journey leaves a lot to be desired in business storytelling.


And this is exactly what Patterson is saying, too. I really like her twist on the hero's journey and how you can turn the stages of the journey into separate stories. I also like her take on why the hero's journey is so limiting.


I usually take a different path than Patterson does, though. For me, when we are stuck in the hero's journey, we miss other critical narratives businesses need to tell like community stories, origin stories, this is how it's done stories, etc.


Patterson also has a free guide to download, which I checked out. It's pretty good. My only quibble is that the questions posed in the document will mostly get you opinions and descriptions. You'll still have to dig for the stories.


Don't be anti-hero -- just augment your story list. Read the article for more insights and download the guide. 


OK -- this supergirl is heading back to my X-men marathon and watching all the Comic-Con fans running around downtown! Have fun...


PS -- and thanks Os for sending me the link!


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her business storytelling curation at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

Miklos Szilagyi's curator insight, July 11, 2015 4:05 PM

Hero's journey primary and some more...

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What Meaningful Reflection On Student Work Can Do for Learning

What Meaningful Reflection On Student Work Can Do for Learning | immersive media | Scoop.it
Reflecting on one's work can be instrumental to growth and improvement, but it's an activity that's often under utilized.

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Ken Morrison's curator insight, May 22, 2015 4:41 AM

Wise use of Mmeaningful reflective learning practices should be:
Metacognitive

Applicable &

Shared

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Storytelling and Interaction: Engage Your Website Visitors w/ These Examples

Storytelling and Interaction: Engage Your Website Visitors w/ These Examples | immersive media | Scoop.it

“How to engage visitors? It is an age-old question that worries all website owners. Regardless of the type of project, sphere of work and target audience, all we want is to win over as”


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Dr. Karen Dietz's curator insight, May 15, 2015 9:17 AM

Want a better website? Then design for storytelling. That's the point of this post.


What I think is really great in this article are all the fabulous examples of websites from around the globe that have designed their website as a story. Doing so is tricky, so having examples to look at is key. And there are a lot here to investigate.


Dig into these websites and look to see how you can beef yours up with better storytelling design.


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

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Visual Storytelling: The Psychology of the Picture Superiority Effect

Visual Storytelling: The Psychology of the Picture Superiority Effect | immersive media | Scoop.it
In Ancient times, Cicero considered memory training to not just be a method, but a form of art....

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Dr. Karen Dietz's curator insight, February 16, 2015 12:31 PM

Storytelling isn't about words, really. All trained storytellers know that the storyteller's job is to feed images to audiences. Image riding or image crafting, whatever you call it -- when we use words we are image writing.


Images are powerful, so it's no surprise visual storytelling is a hot topic. As this quick post shares, retention after 3 days for a text and a picture is 65%. Text and audio only? 10%


The next part of the post shares graphic facilitator Dan Roam's rules for what images to share based on the type of information you want to convey. Yeah! The complex is made simple :)


I also really like that this post is actually based on real research -- that's cited. So we know this is real.


CAVEAT: This post is about sharing information -- storifying information, in other words. I still -- after many years -- vividly remember stories I've heard from all kinds of storytellers (professional and not) and never a picture was shared. Yet those images/stories conveyed orally stick with me today.


So don't go thinking that every time you share a story, you have to show a picture or use PowerPoint. Not true. Except on the web.


So when the medium calls for images to accompany your stories -- use the visuals in this post to guide you.


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it

Prasanna's curator insight, February 17, 2015 1:42 AM

storytelling

Pam Johnson's curator insight, February 17, 2015 9:40 AM

Love this-

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Give Awesome Presentations With These 5 Storytelling Tips

Give Awesome Presentations With These 5 Storytelling Tips | immersive media | Scoop.it
Get your audience's attention and keep them engaged with these tips on public speaking.

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Dr. Karen Dietz's curator insight, October 27, 2014 3:03 PM

Article Link: http://bit.ly/1wCLi0E 


Here is what I like about this article: the concrete examples of stuff most people say in a presentation that doesn't work, and then rewrites to show how to storify that statement, or share a story instead.


Delivering great presentations takes lots of practice and delivering occasional duds. Yet if you follow the advice here in this article, you can nail it every single time. (**Secret: the same tips apply to creating awesome blogs)


I really like the example of how to turn a statistic into a story. After incorporating these tips, I hope all your presentations are award-winning!


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

Miklos Szilagyi's curator insight, October 28, 2014 4:38 AM

OK, OK, one more about the presentations... it would be one plus more than needed if this presentation-business were not so difficult (allegedly it's one of the greatest fear to speak publicly - I can attest this...:-)))... So, it is a short one and a good one...:-))) 

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Telling A Story That Hooks Audiences: A Fab Example

Telling A Story That Hooks Audiences: A Fab Example | immersive media | Scoop.it

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Dr. Karen Dietz's curator insight, July 21, 2014 7:22 PM

Colleague Michael Harris wrote this blog post recently and I couldn't stop cracking up! I laughed so hard I had to read the story to my husband Tim. He laughed just as hard.


Michael uses storytelling in his sales training and he uses this story to demonstrate why it works. And to point out the difference between 'corporate speak' and storytelling. Imagine telling this story in corporate language. We'd be bored to tears.


But here's another way to think about this story: we all have at least one story like this. A story when we screwed up big time. A story about a time we failed. A story about a near miss. A story about good friends who stick around even after misadventures. 


All of these stories have a place in business. Because they make you human. When shared authentically they form and deepen relationships. They let us know that even when we screw up, there is redemption. This is how we learn from others -- about what not to do, and about being human at work.


Sharing ups and downs helps us build deeper and stronger relationships. It might surprise you to experience how showing your vulnerability actually generates more trust and respect in you and for you. When we hide our failures from others, we idealize ourselves while separating ourselves from others at the same time. Not good.


So read this article and go have a good laugh. Then ask yourself, "What story do I share in return?" Michael's story should spark one within you.


Capture that story and share it at the right time in a business setting. You'll be glad you did.


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

Michael Harris's comment, July 23, 2014 2:26 PM
Great intro Karen.
Dr. Karen Dietz's comment, July 23, 2014 5:44 PM
Glad you like it Michael! You've got a whopper of a story :)
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Story Strategy For Generating Lots Of Content

Story Strategy For Generating Lots Of Content | immersive media | Scoop.it
Your smaller stories feed your larger company story and messaging, yet mixing the two isn’t easy. What can a content marketer learn from classic literature?

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Dr. Karen Dietz's curator insight, June 11, 2014 7:06 PM

This post by Emily G. Buchler gives us a terrific way to think about our business stories that will generate an endless stream of stories that are cohesive to your brand. How? By telling stories within stories.


Yes -- what a great point! She then does a fabulous job explaining what she means by this statement, and gives examples so we 'get it'.


Put this article into the category of 'strategic storytelling'. Yes, we need to craft our business stories. But if we don't think about them strategically, we can end up with messages at cross purposes with themselves as we produce content across different channels. 


So go read this article because I think it will really help you generate ideas for more stories you can tell -- but in a way that is consistent with your brand.


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

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Mobile Viewers Spend Majority Time With Long-Form Content (Stories)

Mobile Viewers Spend Majority Time With Long-Form Content (Stories) | immersive media | Scoop.it
Long-form content dominates all device viewing, reported Ooyala yesterday, when it released its Global Video Index Q4 2013. "Long-form" is considered content that runs 10 minutes or longer.  And even longer form is 30 minutes or longer. Watching content for longer than 10 minutes is  61% for desktop video viewing, 60% for [...]

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Dr. Karen Dietz's curator insight, April 7, 2014 3:48 PM

OK -- here's the latest research on mobile video viewers and they are not spending time watching short 3-minute stories. They are watching stories that last lots longer.


Good news! But don't throw the baby out with the bathwater -- share stories that are both short and long. Just don't be afraid to create longer stories. Because truly, some stories just take longer to tell, and often shaving them down to a couple of minutes really guts them..


So share some short gems and add some long stories -- whether written or as videos. And dig into this research so you understand exactly what mobile video viewers are watching in various devices.


This review was written by Karen Dietz for her curated content on business storytelling at www.scoop.it/t/just-story-it 

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Blog Content: The Longer the Better. Good news for biz storytelling

Blog Content: The Longer the Better. Good news for biz storytelling | immersive media | Scoop.it
Since Google dropped the Hummingbird patch, there’s been a new secret ingredient to getting noticed on the Internet: longer content equals higher rankings. Google indicated that content totaling 2,000 words versus 500 or less will rank higher on search engines. We here at Express Writers were skeptical at first.

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Gav Morris's curator insight, February 25, 2014 5:54 PM

The end of succinct at last...

Lynn O'Connell for O'Connell Meier's curator insight, February 26, 2014 2:20 AM

IMHO, your content should be the length it needs to be to tell your story -- no shorter, no longer.  Don't be afraid of long posts as the people who are interested WILL read to the end. (And they are the ones you want to reach!) On the flip side, don't pad posts just to reach an arbitrary Google SEO number.

Prof. Stefan Heijnk's curator insight, February 28, 2014 2:21 AM

Good news for longform addicts. :-)