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The Idiom Connection

The Idiom Connection | idioms | Scoop.it
English Idioms and Quizzes.
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Definiton of idioms, phrasal verbs and proverbs, plas a huge themed and alphabetised list of idioms.

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Literal translations of idioms - don't try to figure it out

Literal translations of idioms - don't try to figure it out | idioms | Scoop.it
There are no two ways about idioms: either tak’m or leav’em, but do not try to change or figure them out, in any language.

attended the universities of Duquesne and Pittsburgh, PA. He holds a Ph.D. from the Universidad Complutense, Madrid, Spain. He has compiled ten bilingual dictionaries, a four-volume English grammar for speakers of Spanish; a total of 34 published titles.

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Literal translations of idioms – don’t try to figure it out
Posted on September 21, 2012By D. Carbonell BassetEducation
Language is not logical, and does not have to be: it is an art, not a science. An idiom, for example, is an expression whose meaning is not predictable from the usual meanings of its constituent elements.

If we hear that someone has kicked the bucket we know he has died, and we never stop to think about kicking or buckets. We hear the words together, the idiomatic expression, and we react to them with a meaning that has nothing to do with its constituent elements, bucket, kick.

Language is not logical, and does not have to be: it is an art, not a science. An idiom, for example, is an expression whose meaning is not predictable from the usual meanings of its constituent elements. (Shutterstock)
We are mostly oblivious to the literal meaning of idioms and we do not consider dogs and cats in it’s raining cats and dogs, but rather the fact that it is pouring, raining very hard.

However, this is not the case when we study a foreign language, or when we compare two languages. Different languages have different idioms, which mostly escape us when translating literally.

Read more: http://www.voxxi.com/literal-translations-idioms/#ixzz27s0AG800


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10 Idioms Linked To The Vocabulary of Autumn

10 Idioms Linked To The Vocabulary of Autumn | idioms | Scoop.it
In my last blog post, I wrote about some of the vocabulary that we associate with the season of autumn. Words like apples, leaves, pumpkin, nuts, squirrels, trees, orange, red, soup, casserole, gol...

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Idioms

A collection of short, sharp Idioms that will keep you guessing until the end. Lots of extra awesomeness at www.ohmycreativestudio.com Created by Matt Cleaves…
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The origins of these idioms will disturb you [video]

The origins of these idioms will disturb you [video] | idioms | Scoop.it
 
We use idioms so often without thinking about where the come from. Next time you tell someone to “bite the bullet,” or warn them not to “let the cat out of the bag,” think about this:
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30 Idioms About Common Shapes

Figurative references to circles, squares, and triangles turn up in a variety of familiar expressions. Here’s a list of many of those idioms and their meanings.

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Charles Tiayon's curator insight, September 18, 2013 2:17 AM

Figurative references to circles, squares, and triangles turn up in a variety of familiar expressions. Here’s a list of many of those idioms and their meanings.

1. To be a square peg in a round hole is to be someone who doesn’t fit in a particular environment, or in certain circumstances.

2. To go back to square one is to start over again because of a setback or an impasse.

3. The expression “Be there, or be square” alludes to often-lighthearted pressure to attend an event or suffer the consequences of being considered conventional and uninteresting.

http://www.dailywritingtips.com/30-idioms-about-common-shapes/

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10 Idioms with a Halloween Theme

10 Idioms with a Halloween Theme | idioms | Scoop.it
Unless you've been living in a separate galaxy in the last few weeks, you will have noticed that many people, including English Language Trainers, have been preparing for Halloween. So not wanting ...

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(EN) - English Idioms in alphabetical lists with meaning and example | Learn English Today

(EN) - English Idioms in alphabetical lists with meaning and example | Learn English Today | idioms | Scoop.it

"English idioms and idiomatic expressions in alphabetical lists with their meaning and an example."


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Know your idioms?

Know your idioms? | idioms | Scoop.it
Only when you know a country's idioms can you really know its culture. So here is a quiz that will establish whether you're a walking donkey killer or simply carrying owls to Athens
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