Identity and Privacy
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Identity and Privacy
The nature of identity and privacy in hyperconnectivity
Curated by Kurt Laitner
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Who Really Owns Your Personal Data?

Who Really Owns Your Personal Data? | Identity and Privacy | Scoop.it
Thanks to an exploding number of wellness apps and wearable devices, you may be beaming biodata into the cloud right now. As the Quantified Self movement picks up steam, who stands to profit?
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Why Your Next Phone Will Include Fingerprint, Facial, and Voice Recognition - Forbes

Why Your Next Phone Will Include Fingerprint, Facial, and Voice Recognition - Forbes | Identity and Privacy | Scoop.it
(Source: Vibe.com) What an iPhone with fingerprint scanning might look like In some ways, it’s a marvel that even half of consumers bother to lock their phones.
Kurt Laitner's insight:

Serious concerns here.  The cell phone becomes the digital identity card.  Numeric passcodes are like cash, despised by governments.  Note the FUD in the arguments for.

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Identity and Privacy

Identity and Privacy | Identity and Privacy | Scoop.it
The nature of identity and privacy in hyperconnectivity
Kurt Laitner's insight:

if at first you don't succeed..

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Identity Ecosystem Steering Group | NSTIC Secretariat

Identity Ecosystem Steering Group | NSTIC Secretariat | Identity and Privacy | Scoop.it
Kurt Laitner's insight:

Kaliya Hamlin Chaired NSTIC subcommittee  romp through identity mgt concepts

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Tracking Sensors Invade the Workplace

Tracking Sensors Invade the Workplace | Identity and Privacy | Scoop.it
As Big Data becomes a fixture of office life, companies are turning to tracking devices to gather real-time information on how teams of employees work and interact.
Kurt Laitner's insight:

via @changeist there are ethical issues around intent, but full intermediation has some benefits for value metrics, will be interesting to see how this gets balanced, perhaps the value equation is the layer of indirection needed

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Obscurity: A Better Way to Think About Your Data Than 'Privacy'

Obscurity: A Better Way to Think About Your Data Than 'Privacy' | Identity and Privacy | Scoop.it
Obscurity is a protective state that can further a number of goals, such as autonomy, self-fulfillment, socialization, and relative freedom from the abuse of power.
Kurt Laitner's insight:

Worthwhile perspective, just because data is accessible doesn't mean it is 'public', there is a qualitative difference in the 'public access' based on that ease of consumption - the other valuable point is that the conclusions drawn may not fully reflect the intent of the gesture being aggregated (a 'like' can mean many things, and can be assumed to mean almost anything the statistician wants it to) - in a nastier world, analytics may show you are an enemy of the state, even though no such intent exists, then we are talking tangible problems coming out of the analysis of big data

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Researchers Find Way to Pinpoint Location Where Online Video was Shot

Researchers Find Way to Pinpoint Location Where Online Video was Shot | Identity and Privacy | Scoop.it
Researchers are currently working on a software program that can analyze online video and pinpoint the location where it was captured.
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Score one for the thicket

Score one for the thicket | Identity and Privacy | Scoop.it
WHILE everyone was watching the fiscal-cliff debacle, Congress and Barack Obama decided that they could still eavesdrop on Americans' putatively private...
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Manna, Chapter 1, by Marshall Brain

short story predicting one possible end game to big personal data combined with efficiency driven structural unemployment
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British authorities unveil plan for mass electronic surveillance

British authorities unveil plan for mass electronic surveillance | Identity and Privacy | Scoop.it
British authorities on Thursday unveiled an ambitious plan to log details about every email, phone call and text message in the U.K.
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TechCrunch | OneID Grabs $7M From Khosla & North Bridge To Replace Usernames And Passwords

TechCrunch | OneID Grabs $7M From Khosla & North Bridge To Replace Usernames And Passwords | Identity and Privacy | Scoop.it
Fragmentation isn't just a problem reserved for mobile operating systems, it's inherent to our online identities as well.
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This Week in Cybercrime: Jay-Z and Samsung Face the Music Over Data Privacy Violations - IEEE Spectrum

This Week in Cybercrime: Jay-Z and Samsung Face the Music Over Data Privacy Violations - IEEE Spectrum | Identity and Privacy | Scoop.it
Plus: Stock exchanges under cyberattack; India’s cybercops
Kurt Laitner's insight:

Hopefully this sets a precedent that will require app developers to have 'appropriate' access just sufficient to support the app's funtionality rather than asking for everything in return for using an app.  Of course a user can choose not to use an application because of the permissions, but they likely will not.  This is especially true of applications that are increasingly becoming 'must use' applications due to the weight of the community using them.  For example, if you had to not use google or facebook products due to disagreeing with their privacy policy would this be akin to committing social suicide, or linkedin professional suicide?  I would suggest it is much better to regulate data privacy 'over-reach' rather than expect users to opt out of pseudo-essential applications.  I can see arguments against this position of course, this is a philosphical position.  A middle ground would be to require apps to tie permissions to functionality and allow users to opt out of specific permissions and subsequently lose that aspect of the application (which assumes over-reach regulation, to separate essential access from spurious ones).  This would create a clear quid pro quo where the app developer would be required to show the cost benefit on a function to privacy release basis, clarifying the value proposition of a given app's information access requirements.

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“Stop the Cyborgs” launches public campaign against Google Glass

“Stop the Cyborgs” launches public campaign against Google Glass | Identity and Privacy | Scoop.it
"It destroys having multiple identities, and I find that quite a scary concept.

 

Less than two weeks ago, Seattle’s 5 Point Cafe became the first known establishment in the United States (and possibly the world) to publicly ban Google Glass, the highly anticipated augmented reality device set to be released later this year.

The “No Glass” logo that the café published on its website was developed and released (under a Creative Commons license) by a new London-based group called “Stop the Cyborgs.” The group is composed of three young Londoners who decided to make a public case against Google Glass and other similar devices.

“If it's just a few geeks wearing it, it's a niche tool [and] I don't think it's a problem,” said Adam, 27, who prefers only to be identified by his first name. He communicated with Ars via Skype and an encrypted Hushmail e-mail account.

“But if suddenly everyone is wearing it and this becomes as prevalent as smartphones—you can see it becomes very intrusive very quickly. It's not about the tech, it's about the social culture around it. If you think about what Google's business model is, it started as a search engine, and then Google Analytics. [Now, Google is] almost characterizing its [territory as being] the rest of the world. It's a loss of space that isn't online. [Google Glass] destroys having multiple identities, and I find that quite a scary concept.”

Adam admitted he has never actually used or interacted with Google Glass in person, but he said he has extensive experience with augmented reality and currently is a post-doctoral student specializing in "machine learning" at a London university that he declined to name. He added that he and two friends are behind Stop the Cyborgs.

Google has yet to release much detailed information about Google Glass, only allowing small trials involving its own employees and select journalists and developers.

"


Via Wildcat2030
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CIA admits full monitoring of Facebook and other social networks

CIA admits full monitoring of Facebook and other social networks | Identity and Privacy | Scoop.it

One use that’s confirmed, however, is the manipulation of social media through the use of fake online “personas” managed by the military. Recently the US Air Force had solicited private sector vendors for something called “persona management software.” Such a technology would allow single individuals to command virtual armies of fake, digital “people” across numerous social media portals.


Via Pierre Levy
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Pierre Levy's curator insight, February 10, 2013 11:30 AM

"A fake virtual army of people could be used to help create the impression of consensus opinion in online comment threads, or manipulate social media to the point where valuable stories are suppressed."

Christophe CESETTI's curator insight, March 30, 2013 9:17 PM

this why the best social network ever is MPRL : Meet People in Real Life

Christophe CESETTI's comment, April 1, 2013 6:05 PM
NSA Whistleblower: Everyone in US under virtual surveillance, all info stored, no matter the post http://ow.ly/jDYRl via @mbauwens
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Google Experiments with a Ring that Acts as Your Password | MIT Technology Review

Google Experiments with a Ring that Acts as Your Password | MIT Technology Review | Identity and Privacy | Scoop.it
The world’s largest search engine is now experimenting with jewelry that would eliminate the need to remember dozens of passwords.
Kurt Laitner's insight:

we looked at this as a way to manage digital rights for a media server we developed in 2000, but this is taking it even further and making it 'wearable' encourages always nearby behavior - some concerns here

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The Rich See a Different Internet Than the Poor: Scientific American

The Rich See a Different Internet Than the Poor: Scientific American | Identity and Privacy | Scoop.it
Ninety-nine percent of us live on the wrong side of a one-way mirror
Kurt Laitner's insight:

echo chamber manufacturing

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The Google Glass feature no one is talking about - Creative Good

The Google Glass feature no one is talking about - Creative Good | Identity and Privacy | Scoop.it
Google Glass might change your life, but not in the way you think. There's something else Google Glass makes possible that no one - no one - has talked about yet, and so today I'm writing this blog po...
Kurt Laitner's insight:

issues with the panopticon

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Why Does Privacy Matter? One Scholar's Answer

Why Does Privacy Matter? One Scholar's Answer | Identity and Privacy | Scoop.it
If we want to protect privacy, we should be more clear about why it is important.

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Our privacy is now at risk in unprecedented ways, but, sadly, the legal system is lagging behind the pace of innovation. Indeed, the last major privacy law, the Electronic Communications Privacy Act, was passed in 1986! While an update to the law -- spurred on by the General Petraeus scandal -- is in the works, it only aims to add some more protection to electronic communication like emails. This still does not shield our privacy from other, possibly nefarious, ways that our data can be collected and put to use. Some legislators would much rather not have legal restrictions that could, as Rep. Marsha Blackburn stated in an op-ed, "threaten the lifeblood of the Internet: data." Consider Rep. Blackburn's remarks during an April 2010 Congressional hearing: "[A]nd what happens when you follow the European privacy model and take information out of the information economy? ... Revenues fall, innovation stalls and you lose out to innovators who choose to work elsewhere."

 

Even though the practices of many companies such as Facebook are legal, there is something disconcerting about them. Privacy should have a deeper purpose than the one ascribed to it by those who treat it as a currency to be traded for innovation, which in many circumstances seems to actually mean corporate interests. To protect our privacy, we need a better understanding of its purpose and why it is valuable.


Via Wildcat2030
Kurt Laitner's insight:

"Privacy should have a deeper purpose than the one ascribed to it by those who treat it as a currency to be traded for innovation, which in many circumstances seems to actually mean corporate interests....It is better understood as an important buffer that gives us space to develop an identity that is somewhat separate from the surveillance, judgment, and values of our society and culture...we must decide if we really want to live in a society that treats every action as a data point to be analyzed and traded like currency...Privacy is not just something we enjoy. It is something that is necessary for us to: develop who we are; form an identity that is not dictated by the social conditions that directly or indirectly influence our thinking, decisions, and behaviors; and decide what type of society we want to live in."

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Wildcat2030's curator insight, February 27, 2013 6:52 AM

An important read..

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NSA Documents on 'PerfectCitizen' Program Raise Many More Questions

cmon the NSA wouldn't spy on Americans unless they were terrorists right? what's a terrorist again? oh yeah they don't have any standards for that.
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Online Advertisers Turning Up the Heat Against Making “Do Not Track” Browsers' Default Setting - IEEE Spectrum

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U.S. will push for open markets, free expression at ITU meeting

U.S. will push for open markets, free expression at ITU meeting | Identity and Privacy | Scoop.it
The U.S. government will try to persuade other nations to abandon proposals to regulate the Internet at an upcoming United Nations treaty-writing conference by showing them the success of open markets, the U.S.
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NYT: Congress Opens Inquiry Into Data Resellers

Data brokers, companies that collect consumer information and sell it, are being asked to give details about how they work, and that could lead to more regulation.
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