Ideas from and for MAKERS
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DARPA Wants to Help You Search the Web Better

DARPA Wants to Help You Search the Web Better | Ideas from and for MAKERS | Scoop.it
DARPA has kicked off a project to fine tune web searches by topical domain rather than subject. By Bob Brewin
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Thanks to Bob Brewin for posting the original link on defenseone.com!

 

[FYI….pardon my citations in this post, I am trying to practice my APA citation-ing (sp?) for better writing]

 

DARPA’s recent Broad Agency Announcement on the intent of the Memex program, DARPA-BAA-14-21, calls for innovative assistance from industry to fill the gap in current search technology. The announcement is basically a Request For Proposals (RFP) which DARPA will evaluate industry interest and response on potential solutions. Some of the DARPA views on this gap left by current search technology, as specified in the announcement, is that the technology “is limited by a one-size-fits-all approach [which provides] a centralized search [with] limitations in the scope of what gets indexed and the richness of available details ... common practice misses information in the deep web and ignores shared content across pages.” (2014, p.4)

 

In their own words, the agency’s goals for new software seem to be focused at developing new ideas and practices for “domain-specific web content indexing and search, democratizing the creation of an index and inventing better methods for interacting with and sharing information.” (2014, p. 5)

 

The intent is to move past the manual method of searching for a match between exact key words located in a centralized index, and towards a future where a search can reach the large volume deep web content such as temporary or unconnected pages or content which has already been aggregated, normalized, or otherwise already impacted when used for analysis.

 

DARPA has expressed that their intent is not to develop a new and invasive technology for monitoring individual behavior of citizens. DARPA’s specific comment in the announcement is as follows, “The Memex program is specifically not interested in proposals for the following: attributing anonymous services, deanonymizing or attributing identity to servers or IP addresses, or gaining access to information which is not intended to be publicly available.” (2014, 5)

 

I think the intent is to find a better way of doing what we already do on the internet, which is accessing a vast amount of knowledge in a simple manner and with an expectation for finding a relevant result to our questions. I, for one, can believe their intent is genuine and the desire to find new ways of spying on citizens is not present here. After all, how else are we going to be able to have the AI-like interfaces (like JARVIS from Marvel’s series of Iron Man movies or the ship’s computer from the Star Trek the Next Generation television shows)? If we hope to verbally interface through unstructured or colloquial styles as we see in our favorite sci-fi shows, we need to give our tech some type of logic to get the answers we need.

 

Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency. (2014) Broad Agency Announcement: Memex (DARPA Funding Opportunity No. DARPA-BAA-14-21). Retrieved on February 11, 2014 from URL: http://go.usa.gov/BBc5

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Ideas from and for MAKERS
A space for curating ideas and topics that could provide the spark for the next big thing!
Curated by Victor Jimenez
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The Visionary MICHELIN Concept Tire

At Movin'On, Michelin is lifting the veil on what we think mobility will look like tomorrow: an airless, rechargable, 3-D printed organic tire, develope
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Robots are being used to deter homeless people from setting up camp in San Francisco

Robots are being used to deter homeless people from setting up camp in San Francisco | Ideas from and for MAKERS | Scoop.it
A security robot has been put to work in San Francisco in an attempt to deter homeless people from forming tent cities along the sidewalks.
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A conversation challenge: Implement technology to enforce law and implement policy, but do so without losing our connection to what we say it is to be human.

Knightscope, Inc. (https://www.knightscope.com/services/) is living in this space and thinking about this challenge every day. At first glance for me, a "security robot" seems intrusive, foreign, scary. Too many what-ifs jump up about possibilities that could go wrong. The image of an evil robot from the Doctor Who TV series pops to mind. But is this really what we have here?

Knightscope describes their products as Autonomous Data Machines, with features that focus on audio/video detection. No weapons, no offense; only data gathering capabilities. CEO William Santana Li starts a discussion on the need for security technology innovation in an 8 minute TEDx talk at https://youtu.be/89ok1fla1ks. ;

For my part, I'm torn (as usual). I do not fear technology outright, but I do have concerns about loss of privacy and personal rights. Some say machines like these show how technology is dehumanizing our society. That this is a step in the wrong direction. I think the answer is all in the implementation. I think people who use technology to implement their decisions and to avoid the human interactions our society requires to stay connected are making the dehumanizing choice.

Some good conversation starters on this topic are the linked article from Businessinsider.com and the TEDx talk linked above. As always, read some of the comments, follow the discussion and hear other people's thoughts, but don't leave it there... have some of your own.
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This 'breakthrough' protein glue could save lives in emergencies

This 'breakthrough' protein glue could save lives in emergencies | Ideas from and for MAKERS | Scoop.it

Australian and American biomedical engineers have developed a stretchy surgical glue that rapidly heals wounds, a "breakthrough" that has the potential to save lives in emergencies, its designers say.

 

The injectable glue, MeTro, is based on a naturally occurring protein called tropaelastin. It is applied directly to the wound and is then activated with UV light to form a complete seal, eliminating the need for staples or stitches. Its elasticity means it's designed to work well on shape-changing internal organs like the lungs and heart.

 

A study published in journal Science Translational Medicine showed the glue quickly and successfully sealed incisions in the arteries and lungs of rodents and the lungs of pigs.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Dorothy R. Cook 's curator insight, October 6, 2017 3:19 PM

An emergency fix that really stick to yah!/What's gluing in health tody? 

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Automated vehicles and the role of 5G

Automated vehicles and the role of 5G | Ideas from and for MAKERS | Scoop.it
Fully automated vehicles (AVs) — commonly known as driverless vehicles — are quickly becoming a reality. A study issued by the World Economic Forum projects 10 percent of vehicles in the U.S. will be driverless by 2026. This is due, in part, to enabling technologies making rapid gains in sophistication and adoption.
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Driverless cars are coming, but in pieces at first. 

From the article… 
“A study issued by the World Economic Forum projects 10 percent of vehicles in the U.S. will be driverless by 2026.” 

This may be slower than some may think, or faster, depending on your take. But I think we should keep our eye on the other tech in our cars, rather than the fact that there is not a driver behind the steering wheel. Think of the infrastructure that will need to be present to maintain a reliable network connection between your vehicle and the connected pathways you decide to take to and from your destination. Actually, maybe you don’t decide your route after all? Who decides then? An algorithm based on the latest updates from Waze? GoogleMaps? How reliable for predicting route time are these apps now? Would they be improved if similar apps had more data streams to feed on forced by regulation of automated vehicles (AV)? 

More from the article… 
“Onboard sensors are arguably the most critical enabling technology. They are vital to helping automated vehicles make sense of their environment and surroundings. Onboard processing allows vehicles to take the data inputs from sensors and act on them to guide vehicles’ operations on the road.” 

“Vehicle-to-vehicle (V2V) and vehicle-to-infrastructure (V2I) communications will also be coming to both human driven vehicles and highly automated vehicles in the coming years. This will allow AVs to “see” and receive data directly from other vehicles and road infrastructure beyond what their onboard sensors can perceive…” 

Undoubtedly we will start seeing pieces of the future infrastructure for AVs creeping into our next generation of “connected vehicles” and highway or city traffic control systems. 

What is your bet? What is the next new vehicle feature we will see that will end up being a basic version of a critical piece of the AV infrastructure of the future? 

And by the way, will there still be a steering wheel?
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StumbleUpon

StumbleUpon | Ideas from and for MAKERS | Scoop.it
StumbleUpon is the easiest way to discover new and interesting web pages, photos and videos across the Web.
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Watching artificial intelligence teach itself how to walk is weirdly captivating

Watching artificial intelligence teach itself how to walk is weirdly captivating | Ideas from and for MAKERS | Scoop.it
Researchers from Singapore and British Columbia have used reinforcement learning to create an AI which learns to walk through trial and error.
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Captivating indeed. Why did I have to watch the whole video? I felt myself routing for the little leg guy. Comon, you can do it! Just take your time on that ice...

Direct Link to video on Youtube: https://youtu.be/G4lT9CLyCNw
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Blockchain: Massively Simplified | Richie Etwaru | TEDxMorristown

Richie Etwaru, discusses the opportunity and implications of blockchain as a paradigm to slow/chose the expanding trust gap in commerce. He unpack
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More on blockchain. Captivating speaker.
"Which tangerine would you buy?"
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What’s Taking So Long for Driverless Cars to Go Mainstream?

What’s Taking So Long for Driverless Cars to Go Mainstream? | Ideas from and for MAKERS | Scoop.it
We have the technology we need for driverless cars. So what's taking so long for autonomous vehicles to go mainstream?
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Who is accountable when a self-driving car makes a choice resulting in a crash? How will we judge machine error? Do we hold Artificial Intelligence to the same standard as a person? To a higher standard? Deciding how we evaluate and engage within some of our complex systems says a lot about ourselves. Do you know how most medicines work? Do you understand how they are made? But many people will be happy to ingest drugs if they have received FDA approval or if 9 out of 10 doctors agree...

How far off do you think we really are from allowing self-driving vehicles on our roads?
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Acoustic levitation

Scientists at Argonne National Laboratory have discovered a way to use sound waves to levitate individual droplets of solutions containing differen
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Voice Is the Next Big Platform, and Alexa Will Own It

Voice Is the Next Big Platform, and Alexa Will Own It | Ideas from and for MAKERS | Scoop.it
If you happen to live in one of the six million US homes that have so far purchased an Amazon Echo, you may think Alexa is just a voice emanating from a cylindrical speaker that knows a couple of…
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We are at the end of another year and looking forward to 2017 I sincerely hope that adoption and quality of voice navigation will grow significantly. The race to develop a chatbot that can understand us continues and teams are working to adjust technology to adapt to the patterns of people. But I wonder when we finally have successful conversant chatbots, orAI even, and we look back to examine what made it happen...how much will people have adapted to understand the technology?
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Because it's Friday: A robot writes a movie

What happens when you take the scripts from dozens of sci-fi movies and TV series, and feed them (along with a couple of seed prompts) into a long short-term memory recurrent neural network? You get this bizarre screenplay, with dialogue for three characters (named H, H, and C -- one of the H's had to be renamed H2) and stage directions like C Well, I have to go to the skull. I don't know. He picks up a light screen and fights the security force of the particles of a transmission on his face. Director Oscar Sharp assembled
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Something strange.... I cannot tell if it is just the director's influence and the actors doing their delivery well that gets me drawn in or if there is something to the words that hints at a story behind all the madness.. Either way, a screenplay written by a neural network and it somehow comes together?? Am I shocked and amazed or just left wondering what I just watched???? I still cannot tell..
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Electronic devices that melt in your brain | KurzweilAI

Electronic devices that melt in your brain | KurzweilAI | Ideas from and for MAKERS | Scoop.it
Illustration of the construction of a bioresorbable neural electrode array for ECoG and subdermal EEG measurements. A photolithographically patterned, n-doped
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"Wetware" here we come!
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The Untold Story of Magic Leap, the World’s Most Secretive Startup

The Untold Story of Magic Leap, the World’s Most Secretive Startup | Ideas from and for MAKERS | Scoop.it
Virtual reality is posed to become a fundamental technology, and outfits like Magic Leap have an opportunity to become some of the largest companies ever.
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German Volocopter’s fully-electric autonomous manned multicopter is performing its first passenger flights

German Volocopter’s fully-electric autonomous manned multicopter is performing its first passenger flights | Ideas from and for MAKERS | Scoop.it

Volocopter is the first company approved to put people in the skies with what’s essentially the equivalent of a driverless car in the air, ‘pilotless aircraft’ if you will, at the consumer level.

 

It’s a people's drone, and it’s a fantastic idea. In places where traffic is insane, like Los Angeles, and smog is bad, also like Los Angeles, a system of efficient travel that works like an Uber in the sky sounds terrifying, but also awesome and maybe even necessary. This is the future we’ve been asking for; finally a product worth drooling over to start the year! And Volocopter just reminded everyone that CES is the biggest show in tech.

When is it coming?

According to the company’s website: The Volocopter is the world’s first multicopter to be granted a certification for manned flights – as early as 2016. It fulfils stringent German and international safety standards. From the end of 2017 the Volocopter will get to prove this in Dubai: At the first ever autonomous air taxi test run in the history of aviation.

 

The Volocopter 2X turns the vision of “flight for all” into reality. Just step on board the first manned, fully electric and safe VTOLs in the world.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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This robot made of algae can swim through your body—thanks to magnets

This robot made of algae can swim through your body—thanks to magnets | Ideas from and for MAKERS | Scoop.it

Biohybrid bot could one day deliver drugs or do surgery.

 

For decades, engineers have been trying to build medical robots that can deliver drugs or do surgery inside the human body—a somewhat less fantastic version of the 1966 sci-fi film Fantastic Voyage. Now, scientists have manipulated spirulina, a microscopic plant and food supplement, to travel through people in response to magnetic signals. The biohybrid robot could one day carry drugs to specific parts of the body, minimizing side effects. What’s more, the robot—and its magnetic coat—appear to kill cancer cells.

 

Spirulina, an alga, looks like a tiny coiled spring at the microscopic level. Researchers had been trying, and succeeding to various degrees, to build bots out of rods, tubes, spheres, and even cages no bigger than a cell. Outfitting these tiny devices with an ample power supply has been quite a challenge, as most potential fuels are toxic to humans. Another problem is steering such a microrobot through the body’s maze of proteins and other molecules, which requires both a way to control its movements and to see where it is.

 

So Li Zhang, a materials scientist at the Chinese University of Hong Kong in Shatin, turned to magnetism—and living organisms. Magnetic fields created outside the body can penetrate living tissue without harm, allowing researchers to move magnetized objects around inside. For maximum mobility, a helical body propelled by twirling works best. Enter Spirulina. “It’s surprising that you can find in nature such a convenient structure and that it can behave so nicely,” says Peer Fischer, a physical chemist at the Max Planck Institute for Intelligent Systems in Stuttgart, Germany, who was not involved in the study.

 

Several years ago, Zhang and his colleagues used the alga as inspiration for a synthetic microbot, which worked to some degree. This time, the scientists decided to use the alga itself. They needed a way to track the robot in the body, and the alga produces a fluorescent glow. The researchers wondered whether they could follow the robot's course near the body surface by detecting this fluorescence, and then use a commonly used medical imaging technology called nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to track it in deeper parts of the body. NMR works by detecting magnetic particles given to a patient before the imaging takes place.

 

They developed a one-step method to magnetize the alga, coating millions of Spirulina with iron oxide nanoparticles. A longer dip time allows for more control, but a shorter dip time allows researchers to detect the fluorescence more readily. When the bot is too deep for that technique to work, NMR can still follow the robot’s course because of the coating, the researchers report today in Science Robotics. Using NMR, they observed the microrobots swarm in a rat’s stomach as directed by the magnetic field.

 

“It’s a step forward that you can track these swimmers in the body,” says Joseph Wang, a nanoengineer at the University of California, San Diego, who is developing a different sort of medical microbot. “And it’s biocompatible and low cost.”


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
Victor Jimenez's insight:
Algae. Another amazing tool afforded by Nature!
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Microsoft’s new coding language is made for quantum computers

Microsoft’s new coding language is made for quantum computers | Ideas from and for MAKERS | Scoop.it
topological quantum
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Microsoft is effectively building a language for computers that don't really exist yet.
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3 Questions about Artificial Intelligence and the Military

AI has moved from the movies to the laboratory, and governments around the world want it in their arsenals. We need to know how militaries define it, an
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Are we making Skynet or Johnny 5? Will other countries' control AI use the same as we do? Some think AI is a threat, others think it is an opportunity.

From the article...

AI has moved from the movies to the laboratory, and governments around the world want it in their arsenals. We asked how militaries define it, and how they intend to keep it under control. Following the lead of companies like Amazon and Google, commercial interest in artificial intelligence is skyrocketing. And so has demand among some of the world’s most advanced militaries — the gatekeepers of what alarmists call “killer robots.”
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A new use for Google Glass: Helping children with autism

A new use for Google Glass: Helping children with autism | Ideas from and for MAKERS | Scoop.it
Stanford University developed facial recognition software that runs on Google Glass that can be used as a therapy tool for children with autism.
Victor Jimenez's insight:
Bringing technology into the home for a better purpose than just entertainment or convenience...

I watched VICE on HBO, Show #74 (season 5, edition 20)
“Autism Under the Lens” and I found out about the Autism Glass Project. (http://autismglass.stanford.edu/)

Learning about the Autism Glass Project inspires me. It is good to see people coming together to make an impact and where the return is so great.

Checkout the Autism Glass Project at http://autismglass.stanford.edu/

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Strong and elastic spider silk can help retrain nerves to grow after damage

Strong and elastic spider silk can help retrain nerves to grow after damage | Ideas from and for MAKERS | Scoop.it
Spider silk may have an invaluable role to play in repairing extensive nerve injuries, according to researchers in Austria.
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From the article...
Spider silk could help treat nerve damage by training new nerves where to grow. Spider silk is very strong, but also very elastic, which aren’t common properties to find together...

Read on to find out more...
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What is blockchain?

http://www.weforum.org/
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From the video:
 "Blockchain will become a decentralized source of trust..."
"Creating a record whose authenticity can be verified by the entire community..."
"...and third party trust organizations may no longer be necessary..."

Think about this when you are discussing the future with your circle of friends and are exploring those what-if questions on how to make a better future.

Think on this. Is blockchain technology something you need to be aware of?
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Continental takes CUbE to Frankfurt for self-driving trials

Continental takes CUbE to Frankfurt for self-driving trials | Ideas from and for MAKERS | Scoop.it
Continental, which also has concepts designed to improve in-car audio and security, will be running a concept autonomous car around its Frankfurt facility to try and fine-tune the way driverless cars navigate the complex city environment.
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Would you step into public transportation without seeing a human driver at the wheel? Continental is moving forward in some German metro areas with self-driving public transportation options thinking that many people will. Thinking about how long a vehicle sits idle during the day does spark what-if questions and interest in the sharing economy.
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Steelcase MIT Rapid Liquid Printing in Furniture

In collaboration with Skylar Tibbits’ Self Assembly Lab at MIT, Steelcase has unveiled a new method of 3D printing called “rapid liquid printing”
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3D printing time reduced. Gravity removed. What could you make?
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The technology behind Aquila

The technology behind Aquila | Ideas from and for MAKERS | Scoop.it
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Facebook's Aquila, the solar airplane designed to bring internet access to people living in remote locations. Checkout the test flight video at: https://www.facebook.com/facebook/videos/10154835146021729/
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Jibo Releases SDK Aiming to Bring Robotics into Homes

IndieGogo startup Jibo has announced an SDK for developing applications, a.k.a. skills, for its “social robot” for the home, which will target entertainment, education, and IoT integration.
Victor Jimenez's insight:
The team at JIBO seem to have something special here. This is the first social robot that I've seen that did not make me immediately laugh at how strange or silly it appeared. Instead, I found myself intrigued by it's fluid but quirky movements and responsive animations on a flat faced screen. The face recognition paired with movement seems to be they key that brings these beings to life and made me wonder, for just a moment, if there is some real spark inside them. JIBO definately has something to watch here. Remember the name JIBO, this little guy will be popping up soon!
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Blockchain’s mysterious origin and promising future

Blockchain’s mysterious origin and promising future | Ideas from and for MAKERS | Scoop.it
The origin of Bitcoin sounds like the plot of a far-fetched thriller. It opens with a nine page whitepaper published by an anonymous scientist (or is it scientists?) under the pen name of Satoshi
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Blockchain sounds like it could be one of those ideas that in 20 years it is so much of a foundational concept, that we all wonder what came before it.
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