Ida B. Wells and Lynching
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Ida B. Wells

Ida B. Wells | Ida B. Wells and Lynching | Scoop.it

Ida B. Wells has been described as a crusader for justice, and as a defender of democracy. Wells was characterized as a militant and uncompromising leader for her efforts to abolish lynching and establish racial equality. Wells challenged segregation decades before Rosa Parks, ran for Congress and attended suffrage meetings with the likes of Susan B. Anthony and Jane Addams, yet most of her efforts are largely unknown due to the fact that she is African American and female.

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Obama says election is crucial to women's rights

Obama says election is crucial to women's rights | Ida B. Wells and Lynching | Scoop.it

President Obama stresses women's rights in Colorado. "Appealing to a key constituency, President Obama said today that this year's election could decide whether women get to keep newly won rights on health care and pay equity.

"The choice between going backward or moving forward has never been so clear," Obama told a supportive crowd in Denver at the start of a two-day tour of Colorado.

Obama cited the benefits for women in the new health care law, such as free access to contraception and preventive care. He spoke of signing a bill setting new rules for pay equity lawsuits."

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The Rise and Fall of Jim Crow. Jim Crow Stories . Ida B. Wells | PBS

The Rise and Fall of Jim Crow. Jim Crow Stories . Ida B. Wells | PBS | Ida B. Wells and Lynching | Scoop.it

The oldest of eight children, Ida B. Wells was born in Holly Springs, Mississippi. Her parents, who were very active in the Republican Party during Reconstruction, died in a yellow fever epidemic in the late 1870s. Wells attended Rust College and then became a teacher in Memphis, Tennessee. Shortly after she arrived, Wells was involved in an fight with a white conductor while riding the railroad. She had bought a first-class ticket, and was seated in the ladies car when the conductor ordered her to sit in the Jim Crow (or black) section, which did not offer first-class accommodations. She refused and when the conductor tried to remove her, she "fastened her teeth on the back of his hand." Wells was kicked off  the train, and she sued. She won her case in a lower court, but the decision was reversed in an appeals court.

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