Social Media and Technology
30 views | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Susan Moore
Scoop.it!

Using Facebook and Tumblr to Engage Students - ProfHacker - The Chronicle of Higher Education

Using Facebook and Tumblr to Engage Students - ProfHacker - The Chronicle of Higher Education | Social Media and Technology | Scoop.it
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Susan Moore
Scoop.it!

A Straightforward Guide To Using Pinterest In Education - Edudemic

A Straightforward Guide To Using Pinterest In Education - Edudemic | Social Media and Technology | Scoop.it
Wondering how to use Pinterest in education? Find out with this highly visual and simple look at how to use Pinterest (great for beginners!)
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Susan Moore
Scoop.it!

Why Email Can’t Be Completely Private

Why Email Can’t Be Completely Private | Social Media and Technology | Scoop.it
When Lavabit — an email service that National Security Agency leaker Edward Snowden used — suspended service last week amid hints that it had received a government demand for in...
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Susan Moore from Identity Theft is NO joke
Scoop.it!

Linkedin linking you to identity theft | Identity Theft Tips

East Providence, RI (WPRI) - LinkedIn is meant to be used as a professional networking tool, but a new report reveals it's putting its users at greater.

Via Jada Lois Laws
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Susan Moore from SEO and Digital Marketing - Eugene Aronsky
Scoop.it!

Social Media for College Students

Social Media for College Students | Social Media and Technology | Scoop.it
This post discusses certain risks associated with social media and things for college students to keep in mind when posting.

Via Moshe Zchut
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Susan Moore from Into the Driver's Seat
Scoop.it!

21st Century Teaching and Learning: Dear College Students: Why Social Media Matters To You | Michelle Pacansky-Brock

21st Century Teaching and Learning: Dear College Students: Why Social Media Matters To You | Michelle Pacansky-Brock | Social Media and Technology | Scoop.it

A friend of mine recently graduated with his BS degree in Finance. He had a great lead on a job at a high tech company and things felt promising. But the feedback he received was, "Spend some time developing your social network profile and then our recruiters will consider you." That's not something he learned in college. But, arguably, it should have been.

Why? Because in a participatory culture, what others say about you is more important than what you say about yourself. Step up, folks. It's time to join in.


Via Jim Lerman
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Susan Moore from technologies
Scoop.it!

5 Do's and Don'ts for College Students Using Social Media - US News and World Report

5 Do's and Don'ts for College Students Using Social Media - US News and World Report | Social Media and Technology | Scoop.it

There are ways to use social media and ways not to--make sure you know the differences. (5 Do's and Don'ts for Students Using Social Media - http://ow.ly/3idv5 - See Jobs: http://bit.ly/LA-PRJobs #prjobs #HAPPO #entrypr #PRYoPRo)


Via John Dalziel
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Susan Moore from Eclectic Technology
Scoop.it!

The college experience enhanced (or hampered) by social media

The college experience enhanced (or hampered) by social media | Social Media and Technology | Scoop.it
When Mark Zuckerberg created Facebook, he wanted to make a closed network for the elite at Harvard. Over time, he realized that by opening it up, he would be able to build something that cataloged the college experience for everyone.

Today the majority of college students use social media. Look at the statistics and you decide if the experience of college students is "enhanced or hampered by social media."


Via Beth Dichter
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Susan Moore from Online Safety and Privacy
Scoop.it!

The Naked Truth III

The Naked Truth III | Social Media and Technology | Scoop.it

"38% of college admissions officers found something online that had a negative impact on their evaluation of a student."

 

A clip from an infographic on microsoft.com/security called The Naked Truth | Beware What You Share.

 

http://www.microsoft.com/download/en/details.aspx?id=27251


Via Michelle Fromme
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Susan Moore from Online Safety and Privacy
Scoop.it!

Want More Privacy? Sign Out Of Gmail, Facebook and Twitter After Use - Forbes

Want More Privacy? Sign Out Of Gmail, Facebook and Twitter After Use - Forbes | Social Media and Technology | Scoop.it

Via Michelle Fromme
more...
Amethyst Mayer's curator insight, December 27, 2014 4:38 AM

After reading this article I wont be using the “Keep me logged in”, “Remember Me” or “Stay signed in”, on any of my social media accounts.

Rescooped by Susan Moore from The Effect of Social Networking on Teenage Communication
Scoop.it!

R U friends 4 real?

R U friends 4 real? | Social Media and Technology | Scoop.it
Psychologists are learning more about how teen friendships are changed by social networking and text messaging.

 

This article brings up some very interesting ideas. In general, the article is arguing that the Internet is helping teenagers hide their emotions. Researchers say that teens ‘play up the positive and hide the negative’ online. Most teens don’t realize that the other teen is most likely doing the same. Psychologists say that a human’s development of empathy and intimacy are through face-to-face and physical contact. And yet, when teens come face to face with one another, they are now losing their ability to empathize with one another. I believe this is an extremely important idea regarding internet users. If we don’t have face time with one another, we will lose the ability to ‘read faces’ and communicate.


Via Shelby Snider
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Susan Moore from The Effect of Social Networking on Teenage Communication
Scoop.it!

For teens, a friend online is usually a friend offline, too - USATODAY.com

For teens, a friend online is usually a friend offline, too - USATODAY.com | Social Media and Technology | Scoop.it
New research about online and offline friends shows that most teens use the Internet to interact with people they already know rather than strangers who might turn out to be predators.

 

This article provides a clear opposition on the topic of whether social networking is changing the way teenagers handle face-to-face communication. The author explains that, through surveys, researchers are finding that more students (teenagers) who have online friends are also friends with them outside of the Internet. Thus, this article is proving that face-to-face communication is not on a decline. By spending more time on the Internet with friends, ‘they can keep up with friends, and friends can keep up with them.’ This article is valid to my question because it is explaining that the Internet is not as detrimental to face-to-face communication as some argue.


Via Shelby Snider
more...
Kirsty Adams's curator insight, January 21, 2013 4:32 AM

Il n'est pas toutes les nouvelles négatives des adolescents qui utilisent les réseaux sociaux.  Recherche a établi que la cause la plus fréquente pourquoi les adolescenqui utilisent les réseaux sociaux est tout simplement pour rester en contact avec les amis.

Rescooped by Susan Moore from Digital Media Literacy + Cyber Arts + Performance Centers Connected to Fiber Networks
Scoop.it!

Snooping on your kids: what I learned about my daughter, and how it changed our relationship | GigaOM Tech News

Snooping on your kids: what I learned about my daughter, and how it changed our relationship | GigaOM Tech News | Social Media and Technology | Scoop.it

When parents stoop to spying on their children, it’s usually because they are afraid something terrible is happening that they don’t know about — and often they turn out to be right. In my case, I chose to do it partly as a way of learning how to use the tools and partly as a kind of research project into my own children and their online behavior. And I learned a lot.

 

In the first part of this series, I talked about how reviewing some keystroke-logging software in the early 2000s — designed primarily for businesses to monitor their employees at work — lured me into eavesdropping on my three kids over the course of a decade, using a variety of tools that at times made me feel like I worked for the National Security Agency.

 

Tracking the online behavior of our first daughter didn’t reveal all that much, apart from the usual teenager angst, but things were somewhat different with our second daughter — in part because she was a different person, obviously, but also because the way she used the internet was different.

 

As I tried to point out in my first post, I am well aware of the ethical quandary that I dove into when I started this monitoring process, and if I wasn’t already aware of it when I started, I was regularly reminded of it whenever I brought the topic up with friends and fellow parents. Many of them accused me of acting like the secret police, and of not trusting my daughters enough — and yet, at the same time, I thought I could see in some of them a secret jealousy of my abilities, since they all felt the same parental desire I did: namely, to watch over our children in every way possible.

 

Click headline to read more--


Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Susan Moore
Scoop.it!

Higher Ed Pinterest Examples and Directory

Higher Ed Pinterest Examples and Directory | Social Media and Technology | Scoop.it
11.72 million! That’s how many unique U.S. visitors Pinterest experienced in January of this year. What’s more important, those users averaged nearly 98 minutes of time spent engaging with the web
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Susan Moore
Scoop.it!

An App Keeps Spies Away from Your iPhone | MIT Technology Review

An App Keeps Spies Away from Your iPhone | MIT Technology Review | Social Media and Technology | Scoop.it
A cryptography pioneer offers a simple way to fight electronic surveillance.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Susan Moore from Identity Theft is NO joke
Scoop.it!

Smartphones, laptops easy to trace but hard to recover - NOLA.com

Smartphones, laptops easy to trace but hard to recoverNOLA.comThe rising toll of tech thefts is spawning tales across the Internet of "geek justice" that tell how savvy victims use Wi-Fi signals, webcams and software to track down people who steal...

Via Jada Lois Laws
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Susan Moore from Online Identity Theft
Scoop.it!

How to Prevent online theft

Watch out for Scam Websites: don’t go to websites you’re not familiar with.

 Use an Anti-Virus/Anti-Malware Program: this will not allow viruses to get on your
Laptop, PC, Nett Book, or Desktop.

You should use unique passwords for every
website: don’t have easy passwords for your accounts, or a password that
someone can guess.

Shop only at Reputable the websites Websites: if you never heard (or not familiar) of thewebsite your purchasing think twice.

 Secure your wireless network: make sure your wifi is secured so not just anyone can get on it.

Only Download Software from Reputable Sources: if you’re not familiar with the
website you’re downloading from don’t download it until you become more
familiar with the website.


Via Marissa Escamilla-Flores
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Susan Moore
Scoop.it!

The Impact of Parents “Friending” Their Young Adult Child on Facebook on Perceptions of Parental Privacy Invasions and Parent–Child Relationship Quality

The Impact of Parents “Friending” Their Young Adult Child on Facebook on Perceptions of Parental Privacy Invasions and Parent–Child Relationship Quality | Social Media and Technology | Scoop.it

This study examined whether a parent “friending” his/her child on Facebook.com influenced the parent–child relationship and perceptions of parental privacy invasions. One hundred and eighteen parent–young adult child dyads were randomly assigned to an experimental group where the parent was asked to create a Facebook account, “friend” his/her child, and use the account over 2 months or a control group where the parent did not have a Facebook account. Having a parent on Facebook did not result in perceptions of greater privacy invasions, but was associated with decreased conflict in the parent–child relationship. When the parent and child had a more conflicted relationship prior to the parent joining Facebook, the parent's presence on Facebook also enhanced the child's closeness with the parent.

 

Although the issues of sexual predators, school officials, and future employees accessing social networking sites (SNS) have became areas of concern among adolescent and young adult SNS users, there is one audience with whom they are perhaps even more concerned: their parents. Websites such as myparentsjoinedfacebook.com are now commonplace on the internet, perpetuating the fear that when parents “friend” their child (or add their child to their list of contacts on their SNS, allowing each other to view certain information), their child's life—as the site's motto proclaims—“is over.” Contrary to these speculations, researchers do not know with certainty how young adult children feel about their parents “friending” them or how it affects the parent–child relationship. With a wide variety of audiences using SNS, an increasing trend is to limit one's social status to “friends only” to restrict one's privacy boundaries (see Stutzman & Kramer-Duffield, 2010). However, the boundaries become blurred when young adult children consider whether their parents should be included in this social network.

 

New technologies reduce costs and increase the ability to share information, but with the inevitability of surveillance and monitoring, they also make privacy more difficult than ever to achieve (Mayer, 2003). While this ease of access is desirable for friends, many young adults who are individuating from their parents may feel threatened by the implications it holds for their privacy. For example, the transition to college typically represents an important shift in autonomy and privacy in the parent–child relationship in the United States. Part of this transition is living independently from one's parents for the first time, which often means fewer privacy restrictions (Arnett, 2004, 2007). Having a parent as a “friend” on one's SNS may make it difficult to maintain privacy and, subsequently, negatively affect the parent–child relationship.

 

On the other hand, technology could help young adults maintain relationships with their family while they are living independently (see also Ellison, Steinfield, & Lampe, 2007; Vogl Bauer, 2003). Social media specifically could help college students and their parents maintain their relationships by allowing them to stay informed about each others' lives. Most of the concern about privacy and social networking has focused on teenagers and not young adults (see Livingstone, 2008; Livingstone & Brake, 2010). Compared to adolescents, college students may feel as if they have more privacy, and thus less tension with their parents, than when they were living in the same physical space. Consequently, parents' presence on SNS may not be that bothersome to their college-aged children and may actually enhance their relationship.

While there is considerable speculation about how young adult children perceive their parent friending them on a SNS and how this perception influences their relationship, this is the first study to test these associations experimentally. Using communication privacy management (CPM) theory (Petronio, 2002) as a framework, we argue that college students whose parents “friend” them on Facebook will perceive a greater degree of privacy invasions than students whose parents are not on Facebook, as they may perceive diminished control and a shift in ownership of previously private information. However, a parent friending them on Facebook may not necessarily lead to perceptions of parental privacy invasions, and subsequently hurt their relationship, if the young adult had minimal conflict with his or her parent prior to the parent joining Facebook. Young adults who perceive a high quality relationship with their parent prior to the parent friending them on Facebook will likely view their privacy boundaries with their parent as more permeable and subsequently perceive their own disclosures as less risky. Therefore, the context of the parent–child relationship prior to the parent joining Facebook should be an important moderator.

 

Source: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1460-2466.2012.01669.x/full

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Susan Moore from TRENDS IN HIGHER EDUCATION
Scoop.it!

College Students Will Sacrifice Salary for Social Media Workplace Freedom [Infographic]

College Students Will Sacrifice Salary for Social Media Workplace Freedom [Infographic] | Social Media and Technology | Scoop.it

It’s hard to believe but recent data suggests that almost 30 percent of college students said they would put social media freedom and device flexibility over salary when considering a job.


Via Alberto Acereda, Ph.D.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Susan Moore from EdTech Tools
Scoop.it!

Why college students need social media business courses and tools to succeed

Why college students need social media business courses and tools to succeed | Social Media and Technology | Scoop.it
Why are colleges and trade schools slow to present comprehensive social media courses that connect with real-world business strategies?

Via Patty Ball
more...
Patty Ball's curator insight, January 26, 2013 10:42 PM

why college students need social media business courses and tools to succeed

Rebekah Brown, CPA's curator insight, March 7, 2013 10:35 AM

Social media is no longer about pictures from last nights party, its a business tool and students need to know how to use it.

Rescooped by Susan Moore from Better know and better use Social Media today (facebook, twitter...)
Scoop.it!

Growing Up With Social Media [INFOGRAPHIC] - AllTwitter

Growing Up With Social Media [INFOGRAPHIC] - AllTwitter | Social Media and Technology | Scoop.it

Gone are the days of dial-up tones and “You’ve got mail!”

Kids are starting their journey into the online world at a younger age than ever, with far fewer barriers. In the infographic below, UK-based childrens’ delivery service companyLetterbox takes a look at how kids grow up with social media.

 

A few poignant stats:

- 5 million users under the age of 10 have Facebook profiles

- 58% of children on Facebook are 13-17 years old

- The average teen spends an average of 5 hours per day online and most parents think it’s 3

- Only 33% of parents say they’ve helped their children establish privacy settings on social networks


Via Mau
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Susan Moore from Online Safety and Privacy
Scoop.it!

The Naked Truth I

The Naked Truth I | Social Media and Technology | Scoop.it

"91% of teens share the nude/semi-nude images and suggestive messages sent to them."

 

A clip from an infographic on microsoft.com/security called The Naked Truth | Beware What You Share.

 

http://www.microsoft.com/download/en/details.aspx?id=27251

 

 


Via Michelle Fromme
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Susan Moore from Online Safety and Privacy
Scoop.it!

Teenagers Sharing Passwords as Show of Affection

Teenagers Sharing Passwords as Show of Affection | Social Media and Technology | Scoop.it
Young people are expressing their affection by swapping passwords to e-mail, Facebook and other accounts.

Via Michelle Fromme
more...
Amethyst Mayer's curator insight, December 27, 2014 4:43 AM

This article talks about how some teenagers use social media and passwords to show affection towards each other and how this is a very bad idea in any circumstance.

Rescooped by Susan Moore from The Effect of Social Networking on Teenage Communication
Scoop.it!

Teenagers and technology: 'I'd rather give up my kidney than my phone'

Teenagers and technology: 'I'd rather give up my kidney than my phone' | Social Media and Technology | Scoop.it
Text, text, text, that's all they think about: but are all those hours on the phone and Facebook turning teenagers into screen-enslaved social inadequates?

 

Teenagers use their cell phones a lot. There is no denying it. What this article argues is that by using cell phones and social networking sites, it is in fact promoting better ways of communicating. By using the Internet, it is adding another form of communication. Adolescence is a time when we are learning how to ‘find our way’ in the world. Social networking allows such a thing by having teens create profiles and link to other teens. The researchers in this article claim that by having this extra form of communication, teenagers still manage to have normal and even better face-to-face communication among each other. By claiming that social networking adds ‘another layer’, this article provides concrete evidence to my argument.


Via Shelby Snider
more...
Katie Maguire's curator insight, July 3, 2013 4:50 PM

I don't know if I would go that far to save my phone now, but when I was younger, this may have been the case. After growing up a little bit I have outgrown the need to have my phone on me 24 hours a day. That being said, I do feel very lost if I leave my phone at home by accident, and scared if it is about to die. I start to think, "What if I am in an emergency and I'm not able to call anyone!?".

Rescooped by Susan Moore from Learning & Technology News
Scoop.it!

Snooping on your kids: How I felt about my father's online surveillance of me

Snooping on your kids: How I felt about my father's online surveillance of me | Social Media and Technology | Scoop.it
Over the course of a decade, GigaOM writer Mathew Ingram used a variety of tools to snoop on the online behavior of his three daughters — in this post, his daughter Meaghan talks about how she felt about his surveillance.

Via Nik Peachey
more...
Nik Peachey's curator insight, August 18, 2013 7:58 AM

This is an interesting conclusion to a series of articles. I was led here through tracing links from Guardian article:  Is it OK to spy on your children's online activities? http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2013/aug/16/children-activities-online-spying

Brian Romero Smith's curator insight, August 20, 2013 11:28 AM

Awesome insight on parental Guidance online from a child's perspective!

Melissa Marshall's curator insight, September 3, 2013 7:48 PM

What an interesting article from a student perspective.